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NEWS
February 24, 2014
The Sun continues its 2014 Newsmaker Forum series with Del. Ron George, who is seeking the Republican nomination for governor. Mr. George will join in a conversation with Sun readers about issues in the upcoming the gubernatorial race, moderated by Sun Editorial Page Editor Andrew A. Green. In the coming weeks, we will host similar events with other top candidates from both parties to give readers the opportunity to get in-depth answers to their questions about those vying to lead this state.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 13, 2014
In the second televised debate of the Maryland gubernatorial campaign, Republican Larry Hogan continued to hammer Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown with his charge that, as part of the O'Malley administration, the Democrat has presided over the ruination of Maryland's economy. Mr. Hogan repeated his contention that tax increases to fuel runaway spending in Annapolis had driven thousands of residents and small businesses out of state, stagnated growth and doubled unemployment. Mr. Brown argued about many of the specific points Mr. Hogan raised, to be sure, but he did not disagree with the basic point that Maryland's economy needs a jump start.
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Letter to The Aegis | August 13, 2013
Editor: I want to thank you as well as compliment you for the editorial published Aug. 7, "Fire Safety key. " The editorial was absolutely excellent and the type that we need to promote fire safety. It has been an unusual few months and people do need to focus on prevention. As Gordon Graham, a well know speaker on the risk management, fire and law enforcement circuit states, "Predictable, Preventable. "  Your editorial drove that concept home! And, as we push for "whole community" basis of national preparedness, your paper delivers the appropriate and timely message.  Again, many thanks and I look forward to working together with The Aegis to promote safety for our citizens.  Russ Strickland , Director Harford County Department of Emergency Services
NEWS
October 13, 2014
Federal Centers for Disease Control Director Thomas R. Frieden has been saying for weeks that Americans have little to fear from the deadly Ebola epidemic that has killed some 4,000 people in West Africa. But with news over the weekend that a nurse at the hospital in Texas where the first reported case of Ebola in the U.S. was treated has tested positive for the virus, even he now admits the nation may not be adequately prepared for an outbreak. Making sure that it is should be the CDC's top priority until we can be assured that what happened in Texas won't be repeated again elsewhere.
NEWS
April 17, 2013
The Sun has indeed reached new lows by blaming the Kermit Gosnell matter on the anti-abortion lobby ("Kermit Gosnell and the 'liberal media,'" April 16). No wonder newspapers are dying. The most shocking thing about The Sun's view is that it is not shocking at all. Sadly, this is what we've come to expect from editorial boards today. Bernard P. Codd
NEWS
May 17, 2013
I am sitting here open-mouthed at your editorial regarding the Benghazi hearings ("Benghazi deserves a real review," May 9). Maybe you should let one of your staff actually watch them before making fools of yourselves. You state that the administration's claim that the attacks were connected to protests over a film was not really a leap. It wasn't a leap, it was actually a lie. Foreign Service officer Gregory Hicks stated that they knew immediately that it was a terror attack. You say that the Republican talking points are designed to discredit Hillary Clinton and President Barack Obama.
NEWS
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | October 24, 2013
Politics is often perceived to be a rough and tumble world. Historically and locally, that's been true at times. Last week's doings over a Gahler for Harford County Sheriff sign were a throwback to more primitive times. In a nutshell, someone put up a Gahler sign and someone took it down. The one who put it up got furious, found out who took it down and there was a confrontation between the two. The rest of the details we'll leave to the police and the courts to sort out, except to say a razor knife was pulled to end the dispute and someone wound up cut, according to police.
NEWS
May 12, 2014
Regarding you recent editorial on bail reform, The Sun's publishes stuff without any effort to verify the facts ("Bail reform is still needed," May 7). You write that "in practice judges rarely overturn the commissioners' decisions regarding bond amounts and pre-trial incarceration. " Here are the facts concerning defendants who so far have gone to bail review for cases brought on May 7, 2014. Judges reduced seven bails and raised one. A Judge changed one $15,000 bail to "hold without bail status" and judges released two defendants on personal recognizance after commissioners had previously ordered them held on bail.
NEWS
April 5, 2010
For years I would carefully craft letters to the editor of the Sunpapers, feeling that the letters section was the appropriate place to have reasoned and civil discourse about the content of the paper. The process of having letters edited was at once frustrating and instructive. Sadly, today's paper mirrors the problems infecting much of the media, allowing a no holds barred, "democratic" approach in which equal weight is given to each opinion regardless of how ill informed the opinion is. While instructive at showing a "diversity" of opinion, the result turns the editorial page into a barroom brawl.
NEWS
April 16, 2013
Many thanks to the Baltimore Sun for an eloquent editorial on the Ben Carson saga ("Ben Carson and the price of free speech," April 13). This is a work of art! The Sun's staff has captured the essence of free speech with professorial precision. And, have accepted free speech that may be controversial, as long as it stays in context. We also got a lesson in what happens when our so-called free speech becomes aberrant, degrading, and outside the limits of good taste. This piece should also send an alert to those who are steadfast in their defense of Dr. Ben. Loyalty and preconception must be tempered with common sense and reality.
NEWS
October 12, 2014
Republican Larry Hogan could win this year's governor's race, but it's going to take more than he's shown voters so far in this campaign. That's the message of today's Sun Poll, which shows him trailing Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown by seven percentage points with just over three weeks to go before election day. The Sun's results are in line with two other recent polls, one conducted by the Washington Post, which showed Mr. Brown with a nine-point lead,...
NEWS
October 8, 2014
The most provocative new line of attack Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown made against businessman Larry Hogan during this week's debate was that the Republican nominee plans to cut $450 million from school construction if he's elected. Is this true? Absolutely not, Mr. Hogan says. But the fact that there is some basis to Mr. Brown's claim points to a flaw with Mr. Hogan's campaign - and the fact that Mr. Brown is exploiting it in the way he is points to the hollowness of this race. Mr. Brown got the $450 million figure from Mr. Hogan's plan for achieving savings in state government spending.
NEWS
October 8, 2014
Complaints of excessive use of force and other misconduct by police are nearly as old as modern police departments themselves; the first known use of the term "police brutality" appeared in The New York Times in 1893, and it's been a problem for law-enforcement officials ever since. If police brutality isn't new, neither was much in the plan to combat it unveiled this week by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Police Commissioner Anthony Batts. Most of the steps it outlined, such as beefing up the department's internal affairs unit, giving the chief greater power to discipline officers and studying the idea of equipping police with body cameras that record their interactions with the public were little more than hasty rehashes of the strategic plan Mr. Batts commissioned in 2012 when he took over the department.
NEWS
October 7, 2014
The development of natural gas supplies located deep in the rocky landscape of Western Maryland carries significant environmental risks, but there are regulations the state can impose that would reduce those dangers. The latest study of this issue - a draft report released last Friday by Maryland's Department of the Environment and Department of Natural Resources - takes a somewhat optimistic view of that circumstance, but isn't exactly a game-changer. The assessment looked at the various phases of the fracking process, from site preparation and drilling to production and finally, reclamation, and rated the potential risks involved from low to high.
NEWS
October 6, 2014
Marriage equality took one of its biggest leaps forward today without anything happening at all. By deciding not to hear any of the same-sex marriage cases appealed to it, the Supreme Court immediately voided bans on gay marriage in five more states - Utah, Oklahoma, Virginia, Indiana and Wisconsin - and likely did so in six others that are part of the same appellate circuits. It was the largest number of states to realize marriage equality on one day, topping the three (including Maryland)
NEWS
October 6, 2014
The decision last week by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Police Commissioner Anthony Batts to call in federal investigators to probe allegations of excessive use of force and other misconduct by Baltimore police is as embarrassing as it was unavoidable. No city attempting to polish its image as an attractive place to live and work wants to admit having a problem with police brutality it can't handle. But since a six-month investigation by The Sun uncovered evidence of a dysfunctional department seemingly inimical to reform, it's been apparent that the city needs help.
NEWS
October 4, 2014
State lawmakers and educators are right to be concerned about how much time it presently takes to clear or dismiss teachers accused of misconduct. When teachers are yanked out of their classrooms for months or even years while allegations of wrongdoing are investigated, both they and their students suffer from the absence. Maryland's school districts need to expedite the process by which such cases are resolved, but they must do so in a way that is fair to teachers while protecting the vulnerable young people entrusted to their care.
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