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EXPLORE
January 23, 2012
The Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center and the University of Delaware have entered into a cooperative research and development agreement to collaborate on an orthopedic rehabilitation project that will improve rehabilitative care for wounded warriors and civilians. Entitled "Enhanced Locomotion for Limb Salvage Patients: Optimal Dorsiflexion Resistance Ankle-Foot Orthoses," the joint project will generate personalized rehabilitation devices (orthopedic braces) for wounded warriors who receive treatment at Department of Defense and Department of Veterans Affairs medical treatment facilities, as well as civilians.
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NEWS
kdavis@baltsun.com | May 16, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley signed a bill Thursday creating a regional 3D printing and additive manufacturing authority in collaboration with the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center at Aberdeen Proving Ground. The bill, creating the Northeast Maryland Additive Manufacturing Authority, or NMAMIA, has been heralded by Harford legislators as the future of manufacturing to bring jobs back into the area and ensure Maryland is at the forefront of innovation. Harford Del. Mary-Dulany James and Del. David Rudolph, who represents Cecil County, introduced the NMAMIA legislation in the House of Delegates and Harford State Sens.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2013
Army personnel at Aberdeen Proving Ground are developing methods to detect biological weapons in response to recent threats from North Korea, including a 15-foot-high device that soldiers have dubbed "the Kraken. " North Korea has issued a series of threats in recent weeks, and U.S. officials are monitoring the Korean peninsula, from which Kim Jong-un's government could launch ballistic missiles. While the danger of missiles is more pressing, Army officials said developing better capabilities to detect biological warfare threats has also been a priority for the past six years.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2014
A team of civilian specialists from Aberdeen Proving Ground is headed to the Mediterranean Sea for what is being called a historic mission to destroy Syria's chemical warfare stockpile - an effort that could serve as a model in the drive to rid the world of weapons of mass destruction. The 64 civilians and contractors from the Edgewood Area are at the center of an international mission to neutralize up to 700 tons of chemical agents surrendered by the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad.
EXPLORE
August 5, 2013
The U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC) at Aberdeen Proving Ground welcomed cadets from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point this summer to work on chemical and biological defense projects. The cadets were taking part in the academy's Advanced Individual Academic Development (AIAD) program, which provides cadets with an opportunity to observe and implement concepts from their coursework over several weeks during the summer months. Ten cadets were selected to receive their additional training at ECBC.
NEWS
kdavis@baltsun.com | May 16, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley signed a bill Thursday creating a regional 3D printing and additive manufacturing authority in collaboration with the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center at Aberdeen Proving Ground. The bill, creating the Northeast Maryland Additive Manufacturing Authority, or NMAMIA, has been heralded by Harford legislators as the future of manufacturing to bring jobs back into the area and ensure Maryland is at the forefront of innovation. Harford Del. Mary-Dulany James and Del. David Rudolph, who represents Cecil County, introduced the NMAMIA legislation in the House of Delegates and Harford State Sens.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2014
A team of civilian specialists from Aberdeen Proving Ground is headed to the Mediterranean Sea for what is being called a historic mission to destroy Syria's chemical warfare stockpile - an effort that could serve as a model in the drive to rid the world of weapons of mass destruction. The 64 civilians and contractors from the Edgewood Area are at the center of an international mission to neutralize up to 700 tons of chemical agents surrendered by the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
A team of scientists at Aberdeen Proving Ground may play a critical role in helping the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which recently won the Nobel Peace Prize, disarm Syria's stockpile of chemical weapons. In a squat brick building surrounded by two layers of chain-link fence topped with razor wire, the U.S. Army's Forensic Analytical Center is capable of dissecting samples of suspected or destroyed chemical weapons. It is one of 21 labs around the world certified to work with the organization to confirm the presence of nerve agents and other chemical weapons.
EXPLORE
June 13, 2012
Electrical engineers from the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC) helped 125 fifth-graders at Homestead Wakefield Elementary School translate science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education into real-world engineering projects May 17. Focused on making Engineering is Elementary's storybook A Reminder for Emily come alive for students, ECBC Electrical Engineer Mark Colgan – supported by his colleagues ECBC Electrical Engineer Jerry Huen and Computer Scientist Azra Malik – led a STEM lesson that was out of the ordinary.
NEWS
March 30, 2003
Two Edgewood Chemical Biological Center projects recently won awards from the Federal Laboratory Consortium for exemplary work in furthering technology transfer. The projects, known as "Design, Development, Training, Fielding and Continued Consultation for Mobile Laboratories" and "Antibody Engineering for Expression in Insect Cells and Larvae," received two of 22 awards distributed nationwide by the federal consortium. Both projects involve application of government-developed technologies to commercial enterprises.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
A team of scientists at Aberdeen Proving Ground may play a critical role in helping the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which recently won the Nobel Peace Prize, disarm Syria's stockpile of chemical weapons. In a squat brick building surrounded by two layers of chain-link fence topped with razor wire, the U.S. Army's Forensic Analytical Center is capable of dissecting samples of suspected or destroyed chemical weapons. It is one of 21 labs around the world certified to work with the organization to confirm the presence of nerve agents and other chemical weapons.
EXPLORE
August 5, 2013
The U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC) at Aberdeen Proving Ground welcomed cadets from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point this summer to work on chemical and biological defense projects. The cadets were taking part in the academy's Advanced Individual Academic Development (AIAD) program, which provides cadets with an opportunity to observe and implement concepts from their coursework over several weeks during the summer months. Ten cadets were selected to receive their additional training at ECBC.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2013
Army personnel at Aberdeen Proving Ground are developing methods to detect biological weapons in response to recent threats from North Korea, including a 15-foot-high device that soldiers have dubbed "the Kraken. " North Korea has issued a series of threats in recent weeks, and U.S. officials are monitoring the Korean peninsula, from which Kim Jong-un's government could launch ballistic missiles. While the danger of missiles is more pressing, Army officials said developing better capabilities to detect biological warfare threats has also been a priority for the past six years.
EXPLORE
June 13, 2012
Electrical engineers from the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC) helped 125 fifth-graders at Homestead Wakefield Elementary School translate science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education into real-world engineering projects May 17. Focused on making Engineering is Elementary's storybook A Reminder for Emily come alive for students, ECBC Electrical Engineer Mark Colgan – supported by his colleagues ECBC Electrical Engineer Jerry Huen and Computer Scientist Azra Malik – led a STEM lesson that was out of the ordinary.
EXPLORE
January 23, 2012
The Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center and the University of Delaware have entered into a cooperative research and development agreement to collaborate on an orthopedic rehabilitation project that will improve rehabilitative care for wounded warriors and civilians. Entitled "Enhanced Locomotion for Limb Salvage Patients: Optimal Dorsiflexion Resistance Ankle-Foot Orthoses," the joint project will generate personalized rehabilitation devices (orthopedic braces) for wounded warriors who receive treatment at Department of Defense and Department of Veterans Affairs medical treatment facilities, as well as civilians.
EXPLORE
January 2, 2012
Employees from the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC) recently afforded 24 high school students in Joppatowne High School's pre-engineering program the opportunity to experience real-world research and development processes conducted at ECBC. The group of juniors and seniors traversed a wide range of engineering career fields, and they were able to interact with subject matter experts that specialize in areas such as rapid prototyping, 3D laser scanning, and robotics detection.
EXPLORE
January 2, 2012
Employees from the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC) recently afforded 24 high school students in Joppatowne High School's pre-engineering program the opportunity to experience real-world research and development processes conducted at ECBC. The group of juniors and seniors traversed a wide range of engineering career fields, and they were able to interact with subject matter experts that specialize in areas such as rapid prototyping, 3D laser scanning, and robotics detection.
NEWS
October 12, 2003
Peter Emanuel, a scientist at the Army's Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, has been named one of the U.S. Jaycees' 10 Outstanding Young Americans for this year. Emanuel was recognized by the Jaycees for his work in technologies to counter biological weapons. At the Edgewood center, Emanuel has focused on devices for biological sampling and analysis. Among his achievements are development of the BiSKit, a biological sampling kit that is easier for personnel dressed in protective garments to use, and a robotic system for detecting the presence of biological agents in samples.
NEWS
March 30, 2003
Two Edgewood Chemical Biological Center projects recently won awards from the Federal Laboratory Consortium for exemplary work in furthering technology transfer. The projects, known as "Design, Development, Training, Fielding and Continued Consultation for Mobile Laboratories" and "Antibody Engineering for Expression in Insect Cells and Larvae," received two of 22 awards distributed nationwide by the federal consortium. Both projects involve application of government-developed technologies to commercial enterprises.
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