Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEdgewood Arsenal
IN THE NEWS

Edgewood Arsenal

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 5, 2004
Milton J. Wisniewski, a lawyer and former chief of the legal department at Edgewood Arsenal, died of pneumonia Saturday at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 86. Mr. Wisniewski - the son of Polish immigrants - was born in Baltimore and raised near Patterson Park. He was a 1937 graduate of Polytechnic Institute and earned his law degree in 1941 from the University of Baltimore. During World War II, he served as an Army combat engineer in Europe. Returning to Baltimore, he practiced law for several years before going to work at Edgewood Arsenal and, for a time, Aberdeen Proving Ground.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
Samuel E. Jackson Jr., a retired research psychologist who was a longtime active member of Kappa Alpha Psi, an historically black fraternity, died Sept. 1 at Howard County General Hospital of heart failure. He was 80. "He was a beacon of light in the community and an elder for young men," said Herb Jenkins, general manager of public sector operations for Xerox Corp. and a member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, who said he benefited from Mr. Jackson's generosity of spirit and sense of caring.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 7, 2005
James E. Sutherland, a retired physical scientist and longtime Pylesville resident, died of cancer Monday at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air. He was 79. Mr. Sutherland was born and raised in Miami, where he graduated in 1944 from Miami-Edison High School. He enlisted in the Navy in 1944 and served for the next two years in the North Atlantic as a sonarman aboard the destroyer USS Biddle. After the war, he attended Duke University for a year before enrolling at the University of Miami, where he earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1950.
NEWS
December 4, 2013
From the pages of the Aegis 50 of years ago this week. The Northeastern Expressway was expected to be renamed Dec. 11, 1963 to honor the late President John F. Kennedy. The State Roads Commission agreed to rename the expressway for the slain president, pending the family's approval, which was expected to be given. The opening of the highway on Nov.14, 1963 was the last public works project to be dedicated by the president, just eight days before his assassination. The 53 mile section was the last stretch of limited access road between Boston and Washington to be opened on the new Interstate.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2010
Philip G. Koga, a molecular biologist and biodefense expert who worked at Edgewood Arsenal, died May 5 of pancreatic cancer at his Churchville home. He was 59. Dr. Koga was born and raised in Fresno, Calif. After graduating in 1968 from McLane High School, he earned a bachelor's degree from the University of California at Los Angeles. He later earned his Ph.D. in molecular biology from the University of California at Berkeley. He then spent four years in the microbiology department at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine as a National Institutes of Health fellow.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | January 4, 2006
Joseph Epstein, a research chemist and former chief of defense research at Edgewood Arsenal, died of kidney failure Saturday at Northwest Hospital Center. He was 87. Born and raised in Philadelphia, the son of Polish immigrants, he earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1938 from Temple University in Philadelphia, his master's from the University of Pennsylvania in 1940, and a doctorate in 1966 from the University of Delaware. Dr. Epstein began his civilian career at the Army's Edgewood Arsenal in 1940, and during a 40-year career there became an acknowledged expert in chemical warfare, detoxification, treatment of contaminated water supplies and safe disposal of chemical weapons.
NEWS
June 19, 2005
Chemical work at Edgewood Arsenal of Aberdeen Proving Ground began June 18, 1918. Later referred to as Edgewood Area, the facility was established in November 1917 and construction of the laboratory began in April 1918. It provided chemical production and artillery shell filling facilities to respond to the chemical weapons that were being used in Europe during World War I. The main chemicals produced were phosgene, chloropicrin and mustard. Source: Harford County Directory and GlobalSecurity.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2012
Francis N. Craig, a retired Edgewood Arsenal scientist, died of respiratory failure Thursday at the Broadmead Retirement Community in Cockeysville. He was 100 and had previously lived in the Loreley section of Baltimore County near White Marsh. His daughter, Dorothy Parker Craig of Seattle, Wash., said that the centenarian enjoyed two martinis a night and smoked a pipe until last year, when his retirement community prohibited it. He also took daily walks and played bridge. He drove until he was 98. Born in Englewood, N.J., he was the son of a DuPont chemist and a kindergarten teacher.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | January 31, 2010
William H. Shearin Sr., a World War II veteran who had been financial manager and comptroller at Edgewood Arsenal for many years and was a founder of the Arc of Baltimore, died Jan. 22 of pneumonia at St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Towson resident was 89. Mr. Shearin, the son of a coal mine superintendent and a homemaker, was born in Uniontown, Pa. He was raised in Point Marion, Pa., where his father headed the Davidson Connellsville Coal & Coke Co. mine. Beginning in high school, Mr. Shearin worked as a grocery store janitor and laborer in the coal mines, where he was paid 62¿ cents a ton for the coal he loaded into mine cars.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
Samuel E. Jackson Jr., a retired research psychologist who was a longtime active member of Kappa Alpha Psi, an historically black fraternity, died Sept. 1 at Howard County General Hospital of heart failure. He was 80. "He was a beacon of light in the community and an elder for young men," said Herb Jenkins, general manager of public sector operations for Xerox Corp. and a member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, who said he benefited from Mr. Jackson's generosity of spirit and sense of caring.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | December 3, 2013
The recently released results showing how Harford County Public Schools did on the Maryland High School Assessment tests, on the whole, show local public schools are what they've been for many years: very effective. A closer look quickly reveals the school system's most glaring imperfection, again something that's been in place for many, many years: an east-west divide that separates the merely good schools from the very good schools. It's important to keep in mind that all of the county's public schools provide fine educational opportunities, but, the ones to the west of I-95, in aggregate, perform at a higher level than the ones to the east.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
Bernard J. "Bernie" Weigman Jr., who had taught at what is now Loyola University Maryland for more than 40 years and also chaired its physics and engineering department, died Saturday of prostate cancer at his Reisterstown home. He was 81. The son of Bernard J. Weigman Sr., treasurer of the old Gunther Brewing Co., and Helen Lee Weger Weigman, a homemaker, Bernard Joseph Weigman Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised in Overlea. After graduating in 1950 from Loyola High School, Dr. Weigman earned his bachelor's degree in 1954 from what was then Loyola College and a doctorate in physics in 1958 from the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Ind. Dr. Weigman returned to Baltimore in 1958, when he joined the faculty of Loyola College.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2012
Francis N. Craig, a retired Edgewood Arsenal scientist, died of respiratory failure Thursday at the Broadmead Retirement Community in Cockeysville. He was 100 and had previously lived in the Loreley section of Baltimore County near White Marsh. His daughter, Dorothy Parker Craig of Seattle, Wash., said that the centenarian enjoyed two martinis a night and smoked a pipe until last year, when his retirement community prohibited it. He also took daily walks and played bridge. He drove until he was 98. Born in Englewood, N.J., he was the son of a DuPont chemist and a kindergarten teacher.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 18, 2011
Walter James Davies, a retired career Army officer who later headed Harford County's Water and Sewer Division, died March 11 of heart failure at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center. The Bel Air resident was 92. The son of farmers, Mr. Davies was born and raised in Sister Lakes, Mich. He dropped out of Michigan State University to enlist in the Army in 1940. "He was one of the last of the horse-mounted cavalry and prior to World War II commanded a platoon of the famous 'Buffalo Soldiers' of the 9th Cavalry Regiment," said his daughter, LeVoy Davies Francisco of Bel Air. During World War II, he commanded a reconnaissance troop that patrolled the East Coast beaches looking for German enemies that might land there.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2011
Jerome Gavis, a retired Johns Hopkins University professor of chemical engineering who conducted early basic research on the Chesapeake Bay's environmental health, died of a stroke Feb. 8 at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 82 and lived in the Village of Cross Keys. Born in Hartford, Conn., he was the son of a clothing salesman and a homemaker. He moved with his family to Brooklyn, N.Y., and was a 1945 Stuyvesant High School graduate. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute and a doctorate in chemistry from Cornell University.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2010
Philip G. Koga, a molecular biologist and biodefense expert who worked at Edgewood Arsenal, died May 5 of pancreatic cancer at his Churchville home. He was 59. Dr. Koga was born and raised in Fresno, Calif. After graduating in 1968 from McLane High School, he earned a bachelor's degree from the University of California at Los Angeles. He later earned his Ph.D. in molecular biology from the University of California at Berkeley. He then spent four years in the microbiology department at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine as a National Institutes of Health fellow.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.