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By JEROME WEEKS and JEROME WEEKS,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | June 27, 1999
In "ape-speak," the name Tarzan means "white skin." Which tells you a great deal about Edgar Rice Burroughs' famous jungle tales. "White skin" refers to the fact that, in the original Burroughs novels and in "Tarzan," the new Walt Disney film, the tree-swinger was an English foundling. After his parents died, he was raised by a band of great apes. But the whiteness of Tarzan -- the fact that Burroughs even incorporated it into the character's name -- also highlights the colonial and racial nature of this fictional world.
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By Dave Rosenthal | March 9, 2012
This week's leading literary adaptation is "John Carter," a movie crafted from a sci-fi tale by Edgar Rice Burroughs, the author who also brought us Tarzan. Chicago-born Burroughs (1875-1950) scraped by in various careers until 1910, when he began writing for pulp magazines. According to a bio in The Free Library: A story called Under the Moons of Mars , which introduced the hero John Carter, was his first sale and was published in 1912. Many more Carter adventures followed including as "The Gods of Mars.
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By Dave Rosenthal | March 9, 2012
This week's leading literary adaptation is "John Carter," a movie crafted from a sci-fi tale by Edgar Rice Burroughs, the author who also brought us Tarzan. Chicago-born Burroughs (1875-1950) scraped by in various careers until 1910, when he began writing for pulp magazines. According to a bio in The Free Library: A story called Under the Moons of Mars , which introduced the hero John Carter, was his first sale and was published in 1912. Many more Carter adventures followed including as "The Gods of Mars.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JEROME WEEKS and JEROME WEEKS,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | June 27, 1999
In "ape-speak," the name Tarzan means "white skin." Which tells you a great deal about Edgar Rice Burroughs' famous jungle tales. "White skin" refers to the fact that, in the original Burroughs novels and in "Tarzan," the new Walt Disney film, the tree-swinger was an English foundling. After his parents died, he was raised by a band of great apes. But the whiteness of Tarzan -- the fact that Burroughs even incorporated it into the character's name -- also highlights the colonial and racial nature of this fictional world.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | August 17, 2008
As Towson-area native Michael Phelps racked up gold medals for swimming at the Olympics in Beijing, I thought it worthwhile to look back at another Olympian, Johnny Weissmuller, who won five gold medals and a bronze at the 1924 and 1928 Olympics. Weissmuller, who broke 67 world swimming records and won 55 Amateur Athletic Union championships, became one of the most celebrated sports heroes of the Roaring '20s and was hailed by sportswriters as the greatest swimmer of the 20th century.
NEWS
February 3, 1996
Burne Hogarth, 84, the American illustrator whose "Tarzan of the Apes" strips revolutionized the way adventure comics are drawn, died Sunday after attending the 23rd International Comic Strip Festival in Angouleme in west-central France.In 1937, United Features Syndicate asked Mr. Hogarth to succeed Harold Foster as the Tarzan illustrator. He illustrated Edgar Rice Burroughs' series of books about Tarzan, "Lord of the Jungle," from 1937 to 1950.Yoshihiro Tokugawa, 89, who as grand chamberlain was Emperor Hirohito's closest personal aide for more than half a century, died yesterday in Tokyo of respiratory failure.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1997
When a character's been played by 14 different actors on the big screen, there's room for all sorts of interpretations. And that's the best thing about American Movie Classics' 32-film Tarzan marathon, which airs from 8 p.m. tomorrow through 6 a.m. Monday.You get to see almost all of them.In a film career spanning nearly 80 years, Tarzan has been portrayed as everything from mute apeman to dashing man-about-the-jungle. He's fought Nazis and leapt off a New York bridge, journeyed to Guatemala to save a friend, foiled international criminals, mimicked British lords and struggled to save his animal friends from trappers.
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By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | December 30, 1990
Q: How can I find out the value of some old Tarzan books I've had since I was a kid?A: Send for a copy of "A Reference and Price Guide to U.S. Books Written By Edgar Rice Burroughs," by James A. Bergen Jr., available for $11.95 postpaid from JO-D Books, 81 Willard Terrace, Stamford, Conn. 06903; phone (203) 322-0568.Q: My 94-year-old mother has a bag full of old pearl buttons she collected over the years. She insists they are of some value.A: Write to the National Button Society, c/o Lois Pool, 2733 Juno Place, Akron, Ohio 44313, or call (216)
NEWS
March 24, 2012
now playing "21 Jump Street" (R). Two cops join a secret unit and use their youthful appearances to go under cover as high-school students. TownMall Cinemas (1:30, 4:30, 7:40, 10:15 p.m.) "A Thousand Words" (PG-13). In this comedy, Eddie Murphy plays a literary agent who stretches the truth on a business deal, and is then forced to realize the consequence of every word he speaks. With Kerry Washington, Cliff Curtis, Clark Duke and Allison Janney. TownMall Cinemas (1:40, 4:40, 7:45, 10:10 p.m.)
FEATURES
By Steve Johnson and Steve Johnson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 4, 2003
Me critic. You stink. Not literally. The Tarzan who appears in WB's new Tarzan television series is a remarkably well-groomed and, apparently, well-scrubbed Tarzan. Advancements in hygienic products - the very products that tend to advertise on WB shows, as a matter of fact - seem to have made it very easy to keep up appearances while on the lam from your evil relatives in New York City, no matter how many rooftop leaps you have to perform, how many tall-building gargoyles you have to hang from.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1997
All sorts of sitcoms that won't be around come September (or at least won't be where we're used to seeing them) show up on the tube tonight."Step by Step" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Dana and Rich (Stacy Keanan and Jason Marsden) fantasize what their life will be like when they're married. One thing's for certain: It'll unfold on a different network, since the show is moving to CBS in the fall. ABC."Dave's World" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WUSA, Channel 9) -- With the end in sight (the show wasn't renewed)
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By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 19, 1992
George McWhorter's mother taught him to read at age 5 by enticing him with the Tarzan novels of Edgar Rice Burroughs.For Kevin Hancer, Mr. Burroughs was "the author that nobody in school was going to tell me about." Reading the Tarzan epics -- there are 24 novels -- was an act of rebellion for the teen-age Hancer.Now adults, Mr. McWhorter and Mr. Hancer continue to be held in the primordial grip of the ageless apeman, who is still swinging as he celebrates his 80th birthday this year.Mr. Hancer runs the Jungle Club, a loosely organized club of fans and collectors, out of his home in Edina, Minn.
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