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By GILBERT SANDLER | October 22, 1991
ONE AFTERNOON in the 1960s, two men were having lunch in the old clubhouse at Pimlico Race Course. One of them would have been familiar only to a few in the racing fraternity; he was an agent for jockeys. The other had one of the most familiar faces on Earth. He was J. Edgar Hoover, director of the FBI. The name was synonymous with power, visible and invisible.As recent studies of his career now make clear, Hoover had a file on anybody who was anybody. Where he saw wrongdoing -- espionage, racketeering, drugs -- he'd pounce on it. He also kept files on Martin Luther King Jr. and others whom he saw as enemies of the state.
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | July 3, 2009
Public Enemies *** 1/2 ( 3 1/2 STARS ) Public Enemies provides a welcome shock to the system. This tough-minded, visually electric movie about Depression bank robber John Dillinger ( Johnny Depp) takes audiences into the center of the action in its opening minutes. It keeps them there as it expands into a bristling chronicle of a country in flux. Depp goes all the way with the role of a wry, wily Midwesterner. He really nails this character - the scion of an age of speed who says he wants "everything" and wants it "right now."
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NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | March 20, 1992
Washington -- The man was a monster. He was also, in his twisted way, a genius. He professed to loath communism, yet he practiced the worst aspects of communism every day. During his lifetime he built a reputation as a 100 percent American. Twenty years after his death, we are beginning to see J. Edgar Hoover for what he was: the ultimate un-American.In her new study of the FBI under Hoover, ''Alien Ink: The FBI's War on Freedom of Expression,'' Natalie Robins performs a notable public service.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | July 1, 2009
Public Enemies provides a welcome shock to the system. This tough-minded, visually electric movie about Great Depression bank robber John Dillinger (Johnny Depp) takes audiences into the center of the action in its opening minutes. It keeps them there as it expands into a bristling chronicle of a country in flux. Without ever telling viewers what to think or how to feel, it raises more questions about the corruption of crime and crime fighting than any expose or thesis. And if it sometimes registers too coolly, by the end it rouses more bruised feelings than any four-hankie weepie.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 23, 2007
A newly declassified document shows that J. Edgar Hoover, the longtime director of the FBI, had a plan to suspend habeas corpus and imprison about 12,000 Americans he suspected of disloyalty. Hoover sent his plan to the White House on July 7, 1950, 12 days after the Korean War began. It envisioned putting suspect Americans in military prisons. Hoover wanted President Harry S. Truman to proclaim the mass arrests necessary to "protect the country against treason, espionage and sabotage."
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Staff Writer | March 22, 1992
LAUREL -- The horse who appeared to be his major competition was scratched, so Smart Alec had things his own way yesterday in the $40,000 J. Edgar Hoover Handicap at Laurel.Without overnight favorite Flaming Emperor in the field, Smart Alec and jockey Mario Pino easily overtook the front-running Fighting Notion to win the six-furlong -- in 1 minute, 10 1/5 seconds.Smart Alec broke last while Fighting Notion, who set some rapid fractions, took his speed to the front. But at the 16th pole, the winner came flying by on the outside and was ahead by a widening three lengths at the wire.
NEWS
By David Goldstein and David Goldstein,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 2, 2002
WASHINGTON - For years, Congressional Cemetery near Capitol Hill was a neglected patch of Washington's past, cloaked in an unkempt blanket of knee-high grass and Queen Anne's lace. These days, the weeds get cut, but the historic graveyard still is going to the dogs. Literally. A cadre of dog walkers has helped lower crime and vandalism in the burial ground several blocks east of the Capitol. The fees they pay for pets to scamper freely among the tombstones have helped uncover one of the city's little-known gems.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Marston and David Marston,Special to the Sun | May 9, 2004
Puppetmaster: The Secret Life of J. Edgar Hoover, by Richard Hack. New Millennium. 455 pages. $27.50. Truman Capote exposes J. Edgar Hoover! Who would not buy that book? In 1980, Capote -- who called Hoover and Hoover's constant companion Clyde Tolson "Johnny and Clyde" -- started interviews for his expose, apparently unconcerned about the 200-page secret chronicle of his own sybaritic lifestyle at FBI headquarters. Unfortunately, Capote got diverted and eventually passed his notes along to investigative reporter / biographer Richard Hack.
TRAVEL
By Katy O'Donnell and Katy O'Donnell,Sun Reporter | October 14, 2007
A man sitting at a metal table, squinting in the harsh spotlight, grins for his wife, who giddily snaps pictures of her husband being interrogated by a menacing J. Edgar Hoover. A couple of rooms away, a group watches a wildly dancing Beyonce as Destiny Child's hit song "Bootylicious" plays in the background. Not far off, Robert E. Lee sits grimly with a quill poised above a sheet of parchment, about to admit defeat and surrender the Confederacy. If You Go Madame Tussauds Washington, D.C, at 1025 F St. N.W., opens at 10 a.m. daily.
NEWS
By Joe Swickard and Joe Swickard,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 29, 1991
J. EDGAR HOOVER: THE MAN AND THE SECRETS.Curt Gentry.Norton.864 pages. $29.95. Never before has there been -- and probably never again will there be -- another J. Edgar Hoover.That notion, for some, is a source of great sadness; for others, of relief.For a greater part of the 20th century, J. Edgar Hoover was the constant grim-faced reminder of the weight and might of the federal government. That presence was part myth, part reality but all genuine power.Curt Gentry, co-author with Vincent Bugliosi of the benchmark true-crime book "Helter Skelter," has produced an absolutely riveting account of Hoover's virtual creation of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, which he joined in 1924.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | May 17, 2008
Chick Lang has a prediction: "I think we're gonna have a Triple Crown winner this year." The longtime general manager of Pimlico Race Course is now 82, retired and living at the Easton Club in Talbot County. He is not planning to be at Pimlico today. "I'm not as busy as I used to be," he said. But then, busy is a relative term. He was the man who brought the infield to Pimlico and coaxed the reluctant owners of the track to promote the infield as a place to spend the day. He relied upon promoters to sell the idea, which was initially pitched to area colleges.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 23, 2007
A newly declassified document shows that J. Edgar Hoover, the longtime director of the FBI, had a plan to suspend habeas corpus and imprison about 12,000 Americans he suspected of disloyalty. Hoover sent his plan to the White House on July 7, 1950, 12 days after the Korean War began. It envisioned putting suspect Americans in military prisons. Hoover wanted President Harry S. Truman to proclaim the mass arrests necessary to "protect the country against treason, espionage and sabotage."
TRAVEL
By Katy O'Donnell and Katy O'Donnell,Sun Reporter | October 14, 2007
A man sitting at a metal table, squinting in the harsh spotlight, grins for his wife, who giddily snaps pictures of her husband being interrogated by a menacing J. Edgar Hoover. A couple of rooms away, a group watches a wildly dancing Beyonce as Destiny Child's hit song "Bootylicious" plays in the background. Not far off, Robert E. Lee sits grimly with a quill poised above a sheet of parchment, about to admit defeat and surrender the Confederacy. If You Go Madame Tussauds Washington, D.C, at 1025 F St. N.W., opens at 10 a.m. daily.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 28, 2006
Paul Coates pondered each question I asked him, taking half a minute or so before he answered. His answers were measured, articulate and intelligent. Just the Coates I remembered from the days when he was the captain of the Baltimore chapter of the Black Panther Party. This month Coates was in Oakland, Calif., celebrating the 40th anniversary of the founding of the Black Panther Party. It was the latest of several gatherings that reunited former members of the organization that Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale founded.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | May 12, 2006
WASHINGTON -- I enjoyed President Bush's good-natured comedy act at this year's White House Correspondents Association dinner as much as everyone else did, up to a point. We laughed as Bush impersonator Steve Bridges joined the real president on stage to reveal what the inner Mr. Bush was supposedly thinking. Sample: "How come I can't have dinner with the 36 percent of the people who like me?" It was funny, yet I could not help but wince at the sharp contrast between his jovial rapport with the crowd of journalists and Hollywood stars and the war of words and legal actions that his administration has been waging against press freedoms.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Marston and David Marston,Special to the Sun | May 9, 2004
Puppetmaster: The Secret Life of J. Edgar Hoover, by Richard Hack. New Millennium. 455 pages. $27.50. Truman Capote exposes J. Edgar Hoover! Who would not buy that book? In 1980, Capote -- who called Hoover and Hoover's constant companion Clyde Tolson "Johnny and Clyde" -- started interviews for his expose, apparently unconcerned about the 200-page secret chronicle of his own sybaritic lifestyle at FBI headquarters. Unfortunately, Capote got diverted and eventually passed his notes along to investigative reporter / biographer Richard Hack.
FEATURES
By Hollywood Reporter | July 11, 1997
HOLLYWOOD -- Being the king of rock and roll apparently wasn't enough for Elvis Presley. He wanted to be a G-man, too.According to his FBI file, recently placed on its Web site (http: //www.fbi.gov), Elvis offered to be an FBI informant.Elvis told the FBI in 1971 he had been "approached by individuals and groups in and outside of the entertainment business whose motives and goals he is convinced are not in the best interests of this country."The memo said that "Presley indicated that he is of the opinion that the Beatles laid the groundwork for many of the problems we are having with young people by their filthy, unkempt appearances and suggestive music ... He advised that the Smothers Brothers, Jane Fonda and other persons in the entertainment industry of their ilk have a lot to answer for in the hereafter for the way they have poisoned young minds by disparaging the United States in their public statements and unsavory activities."
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,Staff Writer | March 22, 1993
Majesty's Turn continued to write an intriguing horse racing story yesterday.From claiming races to a billing as one of the top sprinters in the Delaware Valley racing region is the exciting trip that has been traveled by the 4-year-old chestnut gelding.Yesterday at Laurel Race Course, Majesty's Turn more than lived up to his reputation by closing fast to win the $43,625 J. Edgar Hoover Handicap by three- quarters of a length over Who Wouldn't.The winner equaled the stakes record of 1:09 3/5 for the 6-furlong sprint at Laurel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | March 14, 2004
The Encyclopedia of the FBI's Ten Most Wanted List: 1950 to Present, by Duane Swierczynski. Checkmark Books. 400 pages. $21.95. The whole thing started in 1949 when an enterprising reporter asked the FBI who, in their book, were the 10 hottest yeggs on the lam. Within a year, J. Edgar Hoover -- never to miss a moment of publicity -- institutionalized the list. Here, in a coffee-table size volume, are photos and all sorts of facts and stats on all 477 of them -- 94 percent of whom were captured.
NEWS
By David Goldstein and David Goldstein,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 2, 2002
WASHINGTON - For years, Congressional Cemetery near Capitol Hill was a neglected patch of Washington's past, cloaked in an unkempt blanket of knee-high grass and Queen Anne's lace. These days, the weeds get cut, but the historic graveyard still is going to the dogs. Literally. A cadre of dog walkers has helped lower crime and vandalism in the burial ground several blocks east of the Capitol. The fees they pay for pets to scamper freely among the tombstones have helped uncover one of the city's little-known gems.
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