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ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2010
BALTIMORE (AP) -- Edgar Allan Poe's pale, death-haunted image, with his sunken eyes, a trim mustache and unruly mop of curly hair had endured for more than 150 years. But a portrait being shown publicly for the first time Saturday captures a different figure. Scholars say Poe looked far more vigorous, perhaps even dashing, in his earlier years than he does in the well-known series of daguerreotypes taken in the final years of his life. The more robust Poe is captured in a small watercolor by A.C. Smith, one of just three surviving portraits of the author.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 21, 2010
In the course of 25 years, actor Jeffrey Combs has gone from reviving corpses to serving as a Ferengi agent to embodying possibly the greatest American literary figure of the 19th century. His fans must get whiplash just trying to keep up with this guy. "I'm just a squirrel trying to keep the engine going here," says Combs, who will be bringing his one-man play "Nevermore" to this weekend's 201st birthday celebration for Edgar Allan Poe. "Running on the wheel, that's all you're doing.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 17, 2010
Edgar Allan Poe should rest in peace, and right here in Baltimore. Saturday in Richmond, Va., a representative of the Poe family came down foursquare against the idea that their famous ancestor's body should be moved anywhere, but still didn't decide which American city can best lay a dominant claim to the author. The announcement, made at Richmond's Poe Museum during a 24-hour commemoration of the celebrated author's 201st birthday, is the latest declaration in a years-long mostly good-natured debate over where Poe should rest and which city most deserves his legacy.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach | January 17, 2010
Edgar Allan Poe should rest in peace, and right here in Baltimore. Saturday in Richmond, Va., a representative of the Poe family came down foursquare against the idea that their famous ancestor's body should be moved anywhere, but still didn't decide which American city can best lay a dominant claim to the author. The announcement, made at Richmond's Poe Museum during a 24-hour commemoration of the celebrated author's 201st birthday, is the latest declaration in a years-long mostly good-natured debate over where Poe should rest and which city most deserves his legacy.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach | January 10, 2010
The debate over which American city has the greatest claim to the legacy of Edgar Allan Poe may go on forevermore. But Saturday in Richmond, Va., Poe's actual descendants - perhaps the only group whose claim to Poe's legacy is indisputable - will announce which city they side with. Surely, the great poet and author's surviving relatives should be able to decide, once and for all, whether Baltimore, Boston, New York, Philadelphia or Richmond has the greatest claim to their illustrious ancestor.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 10, 2010
The debate over which American city has the greatest claim to the legacy of Edgar Allan Poe may go on forevermore. But Saturday in Richmond, Va., Poe's actual descendants - perhaps the only group whose claim to Poe's legacy is indisputable - will announce which city they side with. Surely, the great poet and author's surviving relatives should be able to decide, once and for all, whether Baltimore, Boston, New York, Philadelphia or Richmond has the greatest claim to their illustrious ancestor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | December 20, 2009
T he biggest name on Baltimore's arts scene this year may have been a guy who's been dead for 160 years. Certainly, Edgar Allan Poe hadn't gotten this much press since dying a bedraggled, possibly beaten man wandering the streets of Baltimore, in 1849. (In fact, he probably got far more, given that his death warranted only a four-sentence obituary in The Sun). But Baltimore, which has been waging a war of words for decades with Boston, Richmond, Va., New York and Philadelphia over which city can best justify calling the first great master of the macabre its favorite son, pulled out every possible stop to celebrate this bicentennial year of his birth (in 1809, in Boston)
NEWS
December 5, 2009
NEW YORK - A rare copy of Edgar Allan Poe's first book has sold for $662,500, smashing the previous record price for American literature. The copy of "Tamerlane and Other Poems" had been estimated to sell Friday for between $500,000 and $700,000 at Christie's auction house in New York City. The previous record is believed to be $250,000 for a copy of the same book sold nearly two decades ago. The 40-page collection of poems was published in 1827. Poe wrote the book shortly after moving to Boston to start his literary career.
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