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Edgar Allan Poe House

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By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
It was a passing of the torch. Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake took a swig of cognac along with Kristen Harbeson, the president of the nonprofit Poe Baltimore. The two then exchanged a stuffed raven. The occasion was the Saturday reopening of the Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum, which closed nearly a year ago after the city said it would no longer budget the $85,000 to keep it open as a tourist attraction. Cognac was Poe's drink of choice; the stuffed bird, a tribute to his poem "The Raven.
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NEWS
May 31, 2014
The opening of the Edgar Allan Poe House at 30 Amity Street was a small milestone in preserving important historical realities of Baltimore City. This opening also represented a significant achievement by a small number of citizens who realized that cooperative nonprofit action can serve a constructive purpose. It is interesting to note that the French sociologist Alexis de Tocqueville, in his work "Democracy in America," in the 1830s noted that Americans "are forever forming associations.
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NEWS
October 10, 2011
It would seem that the Baltimore Ravens would be the ideal source of the ongoing financial support needed by the Edgar Allan Poe House ("Plight of city's Poe House draws national attention," Oct. 7). The tie in is obvious, of benefit to both the museum and the team, and an insignificant expense compared to team operating costs. George White, Timonium
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
One by one, the sacred cows hit the ground, adroitly tipped over by the best-selling author Steve Berry in his 13th historical novel, "The Lincoln Myth. " Berry, 59, is a Florida-based former attorney and county commissioner turned author whose previous 12 books have sold more than 17 million copies in 51 countries. The sales are a tribute to the author's skill at folding his research into little-known historical puzzles inside murder mysteries starring Cotton Malone, a retired U.S. Justice Department operative turned book-seller.
FEATURES
b | January 19, 2012
Is one of Baltimore's quirkiest traditions -- the Poe toaster -- dead? In the dark of night, on Jan. 19, the author's birthday, a mysterious, anonymous toaster had for years left cognac and roses at his grave outside Westminster Hall. Now that the stranger has failed to show up -- for the third straight year -- some are declaring an end to the tradition. Here are a few graphs from a story by The Baltimore Sun's Chris Kaltenbach writes: Early Thursday morning, a tired Jeff Jerome, curator of the city's Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum, "officially" pronounced the Poe-toasting tradition over.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | February 11, 2014
The longtime head of Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation, who oversaw its fight to protect the city's old structures for more than three decades, announced her retirement Tuesday. Kathleen Kotarba, a 1975 graduate of the Maryland Institute College of Art, began her 38-year tenure in city government in 1974 and has served as CHAP's executive director since 1981. During that time, the commission named 21 of the city's 33 historic districts, identified 127 of the roughly 180 Baltimore City landmarks, restored the Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum, established a popular city tax credit for historic restoration and launched a program focused on conservation of the city's monuments, among other achievements.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
The Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum today looks onto a tree stump and a grassy lot, but that view could soon change with the construction of two large, orange-accented apartment buildings. It's the first phase of a long-awaited redevelopment of the Poppleton area. The go-ahead last week from the city's urban design and architecture review panel is one of the first steps forward since ambitious plans to overhaul a 13.8-acre portion of the neighborhood were announced almost a decade ago. Just west of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, the $800 million, 10-year redevelopment of Poppleton is supposed to build on the expansion of the University of Maryland's BioPark and ultimately create more than 1,000 residential units, a new charter school, shopping and parks in a neighborhood once riddled with crime and drug activity.
NEWS
May 31, 2014
The opening of the Edgar Allan Poe House at 30 Amity Street was a small milestone in preserving important historical realities of Baltimore City. This opening also represented a significant achievement by a small number of citizens who realized that cooperative nonprofit action can serve a constructive purpose. It is interesting to note that the French sociologist Alexis de Tocqueville, in his work "Democracy in America," in the 1830s noted that Americans "are forever forming associations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
Baltimore's Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum should reopen Oct. 4, the group responsible for making it profitable announced this week. "That's the official goal. That's the date," said Baltimore-based actor and author Mark Redfield, vice president of Poe Baltimore. "Things are coming along. " Tentative plans call for the house to be open weekends until spring 2014, when hours would be expanded. Final details are still being developed, Redfield said, but plans call for a museum that will be similar to what had been available to visitors before the closing of the house in September 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2012
Even as Edgar Allan Poe's continuing presence in Baltimore remains uncertain, another East Coast city —the one in which the celebrated author was born — is preparing to honor him with a bronze statue. Poe partisans in Boston have chosen New York sculptor Stefanie Rocknak for the $125,000 project. Her design shows an adult Poe, who left Boston as a young child, as though he had just stepped off a train. To be placed in the city's Edgar Allan Poe Square, at the intersection of Boylston Street and Charles Street South, the statue will be situated so that Poe is heading back to his birthplace.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
The Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum today looks onto a tree stump and a grassy lot, but that view could soon change with the construction of two large, orange-accented apartment buildings. It's the first phase of a long-awaited redevelopment of the Poppleton area. The go-ahead last week from the city's urban design and architecture review panel is one of the first steps forward since ambitious plans to overhaul a 13.8-acre portion of the neighborhood were announced almost a decade ago. Just west of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, the $800 million, 10-year redevelopment of Poppleton is supposed to build on the expansion of the University of Maryland's BioPark and ultimately create more than 1,000 residential units, a new charter school, shopping and parks in a neighborhood once riddled with crime and drug activity.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | February 11, 2014
The longtime head of Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation, who oversaw its fight to protect the city's old structures for more than three decades, announced her retirement Tuesday. Kathleen Kotarba, a 1975 graduate of the Maryland Institute College of Art, began her 38-year tenure in city government in 1974 and has served as CHAP's executive director since 1981. During that time, the commission named 21 of the city's 33 historic districts, identified 127 of the roughly 180 Baltimore City landmarks, restored the Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum, established a popular city tax credit for historic restoration and launched a program focused on conservation of the city's monuments, among other achievements.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
"You might call him 'The Leader of the Cult of the Unusual' " - Jules Verne Edgar Allan Poe, whose creepy tales of terror continue to thrill new generations of readers, lived in a crowded household from 1832 to 1835 at what is now 203 N. Amity St. Poe, who was born 205 years ago Sunday, had lived in Baltimore on Mechanics Row on Wilks Street, east of the Jones Falls, in 1829. The next year he entered West Point but was dismissed a year later. Poe returned to Baltimore and moved into the 21/2-story brick rowhouse with green shutters that was built around 1830 for Charles Klassen in a rural area that then marked the western edge of the city.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | October 4, 2013
Good news for fans of Edgar Allan Poe. The west Baltimore house where the great author lived as a young man is reopening -- at least for the month of October. The house, beset by financial trouble, has been closed since September 2012. It is now under the management of a new organization, Poe Baltimore, and will be open on weekends this month. The group plans to reopen the brick rowhouse at 203 N. Amity St. for good in the spring. Hours this month are noon-4 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
Baltimore's Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum, shuttered since September 2012, will open on weekends in October, offering a "sneak peak" at what visitors will experience when it reopens for good next spring. "There aren't any major changes," said Kristen Harbeson, president of the board of directors of Poe Baltimore, the nonprofit that will be taking over day-to-day management of the West Baltimore historic site from the city. Inside the house, "it's been refreshed; it's been updated," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
Baltimore's Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum should reopen Oct. 4, the group responsible for making it profitable announced this week. "That's the official goal. That's the date," said Baltimore-based actor and author Mark Redfield, vice president of Poe Baltimore. "Things are coming along. " Tentative plans call for the house to be open weekends until spring 2014, when hours would be expanded. Final details are still being developed, Redfield said, but plans call for a museum that will be similar to what had been available to visitors before the closing of the house in September 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
One by one, the sacred cows hit the ground, adroitly tipped over by the best-selling author Steve Berry in his 13th historical novel, "The Lincoln Myth. " Berry, 59, is a Florida-based former attorney and county commissioner turned author whose previous 12 books have sold more than 17 million copies in 51 countries. The sales are a tribute to the author's skill at folding his research into little-known historical puzzles inside murder mysteries starring Cotton Malone, a retired U.S. Justice Department operative turned book-seller.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 19, 2010
A longtime tribute to Edgar Allan Poe may have come to an end with the absence of the "Poe Toaster," who for more than half a century has marked the poet's birthday by laying roses and a bottle of cognac at his original grave site. This is the first time since Jan. 19, 1949 that the person, whose identity is unknown, failed to arrive, said Jeff Jerome, curator of the Edgar Allan Poe House. "I was very annoyed," he said. "I've been doing this since 1977, and there was no indication he wasn't going to show up," Jerome said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2012
The historic Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum in Baltimore, which lost its longtime curator and was shuttered in September amid an operational reorganization, has in the last month been defaced by graffiti and robbed of its wooden front steps, according to those involved in the museum's revitalization. City officials said they are aware of the damage and recently repainted the museum door, which had been scrawled with mostly illegible writings in marker. They also said they regularly check on the museum and respond to any complaints about its condition.
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