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Edgar Allan Poe

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By Dave Rosenthal | September 28, 2012
The Edgar Allan Poe house closed it doors today, which could be an ominous sign or a new beginning for the small home where the great American author spent part of his youth. The Baltimore Sun's Chris Kaltenbach writes that the house and museum is supposed to reopen, perhaps as early as next spring, under the management of a new nonprofit called Poe Baltimore. Baltimore officials announced two years ago that they were no longer interested in operating the house, and cut its $85,000 annual operating budget from the city's spending plan, the story notes.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2014
Baltimore is featured on the July 22 episode of "Drunk History" on Comedy Central, with Lutherville native Derek Waters and company re-enacting stories from the lives of  Edgar Allan Poe, Francis Scott Key and Abraham Lincoln. The episode, which includes portions filmed at Mother's Federal Hill Grille, is at its off-the-wall best in the Poe segment. Here's some of what I wrote about the episode, and an interview I did with Waters when he filmed in Baltimore. “I didn't choose Baltimore just because it's my hometown,” Waters said during an interview in January when he and his crew were here to film part of the episode in a jam-packed, loud and extra-boozy Mother's Federal Hill Grille.
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By Dave Rosenthal | October 10, 2012
The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency report on Lance Armstrong was involved in doping is loaded with explosive allegations from fellow cyclists -- which the seven-time Tour de France champion has vehemently denied. But the quirkiest bit of information is that at least one rider nicknamed a common performance-enhancing drug for Baltimore's favorite literary son. According to cyclist Christian Vande Velde, riders generally referred to the illegal substance Erythropoietin as EPO, or "Po. " But Tyler Hamilton had his own nickname for it: "Edgar" as in Edgar Allan Poe. Hamilton may be an admitted doper, but at least he's well-read.
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By Meekah Hopkins and For The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
I believe it was Edgar Allan Poe who once mused, "The happiest day -- the happiest hour/ My sear'd and blighted heart hath known … is sipping liquor from a copper mug. " All right, maybe I'm winging it there just a little, but that line is the inspiration behind a quiet little bar that opened up inside the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront a few months ago: Apropoe's. Could there be a more aptly named tribute to our adopted son than that? Witty, they certainly are. But what really sets this hotel bar apart is the quality of ingredients and the nice selection of craft cocktails on menu.
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By Dave Rosenthal | October 4, 2013
Good news for fans of Edgar Allan Poe. The west Baltimore house where the great author lived as a young man is reopening -- at least for the month of October. The house, beset by financial trouble, has been closed since September 2012. It is now under the management of a new organization, Poe Baltimore, and will be open on weekends this month. The group plans to reopen the brick rowhouse at 203 N. Amity St. for good in the spring. Hours this month are noon-4 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2012
Mr. Poe, the microphone is yours. A group of selected mediums and psychics will be spending a March weekend trying to reach Edgar Allan Poe, the literary giant and creator of the modern detective story who has made Baltimore his permanent home since 1849. Officials and friends of Baltimore's Poe House and Museum are organizing what is billed as "Beyond Nevermore. " For two days, on March 3 and 4, psychics will gather at Westminster Hall, a former church just yards from Poe's grave, and try to contact the spirit of the dead author.
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By Jordan Bartel, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
Bruce Nelson, a longtime Baltimore favorite on the stage, goes macabre for his latest role - the title literary giant in "The Completely Fictional - Utterly True - Final Strange Tale of Edgar Allan Poe. " We'll give you a break after reading that. Still with us? The play, running now through Nov. 25 at Center Stage , focuses on Poe's weird (of course) final days before his mysterious death (again, of course) in Baltimore. And since he's playing the rascally Poe, we had some rascally questions of our own. Thankfully, he brought up Poe marrying his teenage cousin on his own. 1. The title of this play is very intriguing and a bit confusing.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2013
No network midseason show has generated more buzz than "The Following," which premieres Monday night on Fox. There are three reasons for that: First, Kevin Bacon is the star, and he's better than most network television actors. Here he plays an angry, burned-out ex-F.B.I. agent with a drinking problem who is called out of retirement when a serial killer escapes from prison. Second, because the serial killer worships Edgar Allan Poe, the series is drenched in all things Poe. Baltimore, being filled with Poe Lovers, is a prime target for the Fox publicity campaign.
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By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2005
A birthday seemed the right occasion to mend some family fences. So last weekend Luke Harvey Poe Jr., a hale 89-year-old who lives in Annapolis and practices law in Washington, rapped on the door of a tiny rowhouse in West Baltimore inhabited by another Poe in another century. Were he still alive, Edgar Allan Poe would celebrate his 196th birthday Wednesday. Harvey Poe's recent visit - his first to the house - was a long-overdue call because, as he recounted, his affluent Richmond relatives considered Edgar Allan Poe a ne'er-do-well.
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By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1998
As a boy, George Figgs was fascinated by the tales of terror crafted a century before by Edgar Allan Poe. As a man, he read everything he could get his hands on by and about the author. And at the age of 40, the same age that Poe died, Figgs quit his job as a bartender and spent 18 months ransacking libraries for every scrap of information about the mysterious events surrounding Poe's death."I found myself in rare book vaults with white cotton gloves on, with letters Poe had written to his mother-in-law, to his sister," says Figgs, 50, the founder of the Orpheum Cinema in Fells Point.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2014
Edgar Allan Poe was a pretty open-minded guy. "I do not believe that any thought, properly so called," he once said, "is out of the reach of language. " So this Baltimore favorite son presumably would have been cool with the "Homo Poe Show," which started as a single thought - Is there a way to see Poe through a gay lens? - and resulted in enough provocative language to launch an evening-length collection of four short theater works. It's the brainchild of Steven J. Satta, founding member and artistic director of Iron Crow Theatre Company, a Baltimore troupe that emphasizes works with lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender perspectives.
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By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
Christina Goodman's hand-painted raven faces left in strict profile, and despite the miniature scale carries the flavor of Renaissance portraiture in the sober expression and fine detail. It's one of her contributions to a small collection of handmade jewelry celebrating Baltimore and Maryland icons. The ravens, crabs, white oaks, orioles, black-eyed Susans and Edgar Allan Poes were on view this weekend as thousands of browsers and buyers strolled through the Baltimore Convention Center for the American Craft Council Show, its 38th year in the city.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
"You might call him 'The Leader of the Cult of the Unusual' " - Jules Verne Edgar Allan Poe, whose creepy tales of terror continue to thrill new generations of readers, lived in a crowded household from 1832 to 1835 at what is now 203 N. Amity St. Poe, who was born 205 years ago Sunday, had lived in Baltimore on Mechanics Row on Wilks Street, east of the Jones Falls, in 1829. The next year he entered West Point but was dismissed a year later. Poe returned to Baltimore and moved into the 21/2-story brick rowhouse with green shutters that was built around 1830 for Charles Klassen in a rural area that then marked the western edge of the city.
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By Evan Siple | December 10, 2013
Annabel Lee Tavern, which celebrated its sixth birthday this past weekend, is well known for its unending dedication to the mythos of Edgar Allan Poe in its decor, atmosphere and oh, yes of course, its cocktail menu. A seasonally rotating selection of Poe-inspired creations to whet the whistle, all of which pay homage to the author's many works. This season's inspiration comes with its own set of hits, one in particular is a loving tribute to an enchantress named Isadore (featured in Poe's poem "To Isadore")
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Jacques Kelly | October 25, 2013
The stream of visitors who passed through the iron gates at Fayette and Greene streets this week reverenced Edgar Allan Poe's monument and grave, but then they soon drifted along the lanes and brick paths of this historic churchyard on the western edge of downtown Baltimore. This Halloween offers visitors a chance to go one better. The catacombs under the 1851 Westminster Presbyterian Church will be open Thursday. And while I am not much of a believer in ghosts, this quirky part of old-time Baltimore is a must destination for the ghost-believing or merely historically curious.
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By Dave Rosenthal | October 4, 2013
Good news for fans of Edgar Allan Poe. The west Baltimore house where the great author lived as a young man is reopening -- at least for the month of October. The house, beset by financial trouble, has been closed since September 2012. It is now under the management of a new organization, Poe Baltimore, and will be open on weekends this month. The group plans to reopen the brick rowhouse at 203 N. Amity St. for good in the spring. Hours this month are noon-4 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | October 4, 2009
Menacing ravens, peering eyes, black cats and rats, ominous bells, violent eddies - imagery that fueled many a text by Edgar Allan Poe, and generated a good deal of art. For its contribution to the bicentennial commemoration of the author's birth, the Baltimore Museum of Art has put together a dynamic collection of works directly or seemingly inspired by the author. The displays are divided into three thematic groupings: Love and Loss, Fear and Terror, Madness and Obsession. "As you can see, this is an uplifting exhibit," says BMA director Doreen Bolger, who curated the show.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | October 10, 2007
Acity known for a bell that's broken and a delicacy that's Cheez Whiz-ed wants to up its cultural clout - by stealing Edgar Allan Poe from Baltimore. "We're Taking Poe Back," read the headline in Philadelphia's City Paper last week. Arguing that Philly's claim on Poe is greater than Baltimore's, the article urges Philadelphians to "reclaim our macabre, prodigal son" in time for the 2009 bicentennial of Poe's birth. "This is a literary grave robbing," reporter Edward Pettit began. "I want to exhume his body and translate his remains to the City of Brotherly Love.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2013
If you've got any Edgar Allan Poe manuscripts lying around, this may be a good time to sell them. A copy of Poe's poem "The Conqueror Worm," hand-written and signed by the author, sold for $300,000 Saturday -- about $280,000 more than the New England auction house handling it had expected. The yellowed document was purchased by an anonymous collector, SouthCoastToday.com reports, who has 10 days to verify its authenticity before the sale is final. It had been owned by a Rhode Island family since 1920, and was offered for auction by Marion Antique Auctions in Marion, Mass.
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