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By J.D. Considine | August 28, 1993
The Eddie Murphy concert slated for Hammerjacks this evening has been canceled due to throat problems, it was announced late yesterday.According to Terrie Williams, Murphy's publicist, the comedian and singer had been feeling strained for much of the two-week tour with his band, Psychedelic Psoul. "There's been a lot on him," she said.Moreover, with filming scheduled to begin next week on "Beverly Hills Cop 3," Murphy apparently felt it would be unwise to risk damaging his voice by playing in Baltimore, the final date of the tour.
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By Dustin Levy | June 11, 2013
Known for his spot-on impressions of President Obama, Eddie Murphy, Denzel Washington and many others, cast member Jay Pharoah prepares for his first stand-up performance in Baltimore at the Baltimore Comedy Factory from Friday through Sunday. We spoke with Pharoah about discovering his knack for impressions, meeting Obama and previewing the next season of "SNL. " What are you looking forward to about performing here? Any time I can get on the stage and just show the world, that's the way to do it. I'm just excited about people coming out. I'm excited about another market seeing the talent.
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NEWS
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Staff Writer | May 9, 1992
The young actor strode confidently into the courtroom-turned-movie set to take his place and wait for a cue. The setting was Courtroom 600 in the Clarence Mitchell Courthouse.It was a bit of Hollywood comes to Baltimore as the filming of Eddie Murphy's new movie, "Distinguished Gentleman," began yesterday. Mr. Murphy plays a con man elected to Congress. It also stars Baltimorean Charles Dutton, who appears on the Fox network TV show "Roc."The bright lights that were set up overhead made the courtroom abysmally hot. But none of the dozens of crew members swirling around the room or extras who stood around seemed to notice.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | June 12, 2009
All You Need Is Love" serves as the theme song for Imagine That the way "It Only Takes a Moment" did for Wall-E. When driven financial analyst Evan Danielson (Eddie Murphy) uses it to teach his 7-year-old daughter Olivia (Yara Shahidi) how to carry a tune, the scene sums up what director Karey Kirkpatrick thinks fathers and kids should do together: not act in perfect harmony, but raise a joyful noise. The movie is, in one way, bracingly old-fashioned. Although it pivots on Olivia's private fantasy world, complete with queen, princesses and fire-breathing dragon, this is one family film that abjures special effects.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | August 27, 1993
Over the phone, he sounds like any other singer at the start of a tour. He talks about his band, describes his songwriting routine, mentions how much he enjoys the intimacy of club shows, and jokes about having to be on the bus for the ride to Poughkeepsie. Hearing him talk, you'd think he was just another guy trying get people to come out and listen to his music.But he's not just another guy. He's Eddie Murphy. And that lends an entirely different tone to his career in music."People already have a perception of who they think I am," he admits, over the phone from Connecticut.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | December 4, 1992
In "The Distinguished Gentleman," Mr. Murphy goes to Washington, and discovers a city that is last in war, last in peace, and not even in the American League any more.The movie itself isn't much better: It's last in laughs, last in drama but first in Murphy ego, as he gives a performance that everybody has seen before, only louder.The gimmick in the plot is that it attempts to reverse the trajectory in all those other Washington movies, the ones where the naive and earnest crusader moves to D.C. and is corrupted by the greed and sleaze that is so a part of the system.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 3, 2006
LOS ANGELES --Talk about Eddie Murphy's Oscar potential has stirred Hollywood in recent weeks, as members of the press and film industry insiders got their first glimpses of his performance as James Early, the James Brown-like singer who dominates the first part of Dreamgirls. The film, adapted by the writer and director Bill Condon from the stage musical and starring Jamie Foxx and Beyonce Knowles, is set to open Dec. 15 in single theaters in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco, before its nationwide release by DreamWorks and Paramount Pictures on Christmas Day. But boosters are already hailing Murphy's unaccustomed appearance in a supporting role (unless you count those pictures in which he appeared in support of himself)
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Staff Writer | May 8, 1992
The Clarence Mitchell Courthouse in Baltimore was crawling with dozens of Hollywood types -- production managers, a guy with a rack of 50 ties, men lugging big bundles of wires -- as actor Eddie Murphy was in town today to film part of a movie that seems to imitate life these days.The movie, a comedy called "Distinguished Gentleman," is about corruption in Congress.A production crew consisting of about 125 people was bustling in and out of the courthouse. Several tractor-trailers, a tour bus and other vehicles were parked by the North Calvert Street entrance.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 28, 2000
In "Nutty Professor II: The Klumps," Eddie Murphy resuscitates the lovable, ever-squabbling family that made the first "Nutty Professor" (well, second if you count Jerry Lewis' original) such a big hit. It's easy to see why: Murphy plays eight characters in "The Klumps" and brings a dazzling amount of energy, focus and heart to what must have been a daunting thespian enterprise. Unfortunately, his efforts aren't matched by the filmmakers, who have plopped Murphy's wonderful characters into a stock exploitation comedy that uses flatulence, scatology and even bestiality to garner laughs.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1998
Eddie Murphy talking to animals now you know that's got to be funny.And it is. So long as the animals are on screen, "Doctor Dolittle" is a riot, even if the usually irrepressible Murray ends up playing second fiddle to a bunch of critters. Unfortunately, screenwriters Nat Mauldin and Larry Levin and director Betty Thomas aren't satisfied with making us laugh; they want to teach us a lesson. And it's when the film starts preachifying that things start to drag.Based on the children's books of Hugh Lofting, this "Doctor Dolittle" bears only passing resemblance -- thankfully -- to the lumbering 1967 musical starring Rex Harrison and Anthony Newley.
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By Rick Bentley and Rick Bentley,McClatchy Newspapers | August 8, 2007
Eddie Murphy and Jeff Garlin must be the smartest men in the entertainment world. The actors had enough brain cells to know that their Daddy Day Care was an unexpected hit in 2003. That meant pushing the premise for a sequel made about as much sense as wearing a meat bathing suit in a pool of piranhas. Cuba Gooding Jr. and Paul Rae must be the dumbest men in entertainment. Gooding adds the Daddy Day Care sequel, Daddy Day Camp, to a resume that includes Rat Race, Boat Trip and Norbit. These awful efforts have come along since he picked up the best supporting actor Oscar for his work in the 1996 film Jerry Maguire.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 18, 2007
Eddie Murphy's lovable, febrile Donkey hasn't lost his kick, and Antonio Banderas' debonair Puss in Boots overflows with a ticklish feline unpredictability. But Mike Myers' Shrek and Cameron Diaz's Fiona supply the comic heart that turns Shrek the Third into a genuine slapstick fairy tale. With an original story by Andrew Adamson (who went from directing two Shreks to The Chronicles of Narnia), Shrek the Third puts a satisfying spin on the concept of Happily Ever After. It's about loosening the shackles of old scores and fears and taking your destiny into your own hands, paws or claws.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 9, 2007
As he shows in Dreamgirls, Eddie Murphy may have a sensational future as an actor. But when playing multiple characters in farcical vehicles like Norbit, Murphy has begun to wear out his welcome. His only recent comedy hits have taken him from the crazy Eddie of the Nutty Professor films to the fresh-as-a-daisy Eddie of the Dr. Dolittle films. Now we get a lazy Eddie in Norbit, a lackluster attempt to make a gross-out romantic comedy. When I say lazy Eddie, I mean imaginatively lazy. Murphy plays three roles: the lovably shy orphan Norbit, his enormous wife Rasputia and Mr. Wong, the owner of the Golden Won Ton restaurant and orphanage.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 25, 2006
Talent that floods off the screen and leaves you ecstatically drenched in emotion and street wit. That's what Dreamgirls, a brash heartbreaker of a musical, provides for most of its swift and enthralling 131 minutes. It's there every second Jennifer Hudson and Eddie Murphy take the screen. And it's there whenever writer-director Bill Condon unites music and storytelling in a torrent of imagery that revives both the social tumult of the 1960s and the glorious pop culture that grew out of it. Jamie Foxx and Beyonce Knowles are the top-billed stars, but Hudson and Murphy are the heart and soul-man of this movie.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 3, 2006
LOS ANGELES --Talk about Eddie Murphy's Oscar potential has stirred Hollywood in recent weeks, as members of the press and film industry insiders got their first glimpses of his performance as James Early, the James Brown-like singer who dominates the first part of Dreamgirls. The film, adapted by the writer and director Bill Condon from the stage musical and starring Jamie Foxx and Beyonce Knowles, is set to open Dec. 15 in single theaters in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco, before its nationwide release by DreamWorks and Paramount Pictures on Christmas Day. But boosters are already hailing Murphy's unaccustomed appearance in a supporting role (unless you count those pictures in which he appeared in support of himself)
FEATURES
February 17, 2006
Critic's Pick-- A rotund scientist (Eddie Murphy, above) finds a formula that turns him into a svelte playboy in The Nutty Professor (8 p.m.-10 p.m., Bravo).
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | June 12, 2009
All You Need Is Love" serves as the theme song for Imagine That the way "It Only Takes a Moment" did for Wall-E. When driven financial analyst Evan Danielson (Eddie Murphy) uses it to teach his 7-year-old daughter Olivia (Yara Shahidi) how to carry a tune, the scene sums up what director Karey Kirkpatrick thinks fathers and kids should do together: not act in perfect harmony, but raise a joyful noise. The movie is, in one way, bracingly old-fashioned. Although it pivots on Olivia's private fantasy world, complete with queen, princesses and fire-breathing dragon, this is one family film that abjures special effects.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1998
A feel-good movie that won't make you feel good, "Holy Man" is so rife with problems that it's hard to believe anyone really thought this thing through before OK'ing it.It wastes Eddie Murphy. It treats musings that would look trite on a Hallmark card as wisdom. It takes potshots at only the most obvious of targets and pretends to be satire. And it treats the ability to smile while conning people out of their money as a good thing.Murphy (remember when his comedies had bite to them?) plays an enigmatic, robe-wearing philosopher-type first seen walking blithely along a highway, kissing the ground and ignoring the taunts of passing motorists.
NEWS
By RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ and RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 20, 2005
HOLLYWOOD - With his wildly colorful T-shirts and gargantuan belt buckles that would make a member of World Wrestling Entertainment proud, 66-year-old Paul Bloch doesn't look like your typical celebrity publicist. But when Tom Cruise, America's favorite out-of-control movie star, announced his hiring this month, Hollywood was waiting to see whether the couch-hopping, psychiatry-bashing, Scientology-proselytizing genie could be stuffed back into the bottle. Bloch certainly seems equipped for the job, with his four decades in the business and his ability to make big, tough male movie stars feel safe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christopher Kelly and Christopher Kelly,Knight Ridder / Tribune | November 30, 2003
The holiday movie season is once again upon us -- and this year, the choices are particularly difficult to make. So many felons to see, so little time. There's a family movie starring the guy who was once pulled over while in the company of a transsexual prostitute. But maybe you'd rather see the horror movie starring the woman who once crashed into another woman's car, then sped away from the scene. Or maybe the romantic comedy with the Brit who was once arrested for soliciting a hooker in Los Angeles?
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