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By TOM DUNKEL and TOM DUNKEL,SUN REPORTER | August 10, 2006
In a 2005 article for Disability Studies Quarterly, author Betty Adelson notes that little people "are highlighted in the legends and myths of every nation." Dwarfs were teamed with Amazonian gladiators in Rome; elevated to the status of priests in ancient Egypt. Later they became objects of private amusement for English royalty. The 18th century ushered in the golden era of sideshows and circuses - and greater public exposure. Here are a few highlights of little people in American pop culture: Charles Stratton, dubbed "General Tom Thumb," peaked at 3 feet 4 inches.
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FEATURES
By TOM DUNKEL and TOM DUNKEL,SUN REPORTER | August 10, 2006
In a 2005 article for Disability Studies Quarterly, author Betty Adelson notes that little people "are highlighted in the legends and myths of every nation." Dwarfs were teamed with Amazonian gladiators in Rome; elevated to the status of priests in ancient Egypt. Later they became objects of private amusement for English royalty. The 18th century ushered in the golden era of sideshows and circuses - and greater public exposure. Here are a few highlights of little people in American pop culture: Charles Stratton, dubbed "General Tom Thumb," peaked at 3 feet 4 inches.
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NEWS
May 10, 2006
Jim Delsing, 80, an outstanding defensive outfielder who played 10 seasons in the American League but was remembered mostly for his role in baseball's most famous stunt, died of complications from cancer Thursday at his home in Chesterfield, Mo. On Aug. 19, 1951, the last-place St. Louis Browns were playing the Detroit Tigers in the second game of a doubleheader at Sportsman's Park in St. Louis. Bill Veeck, the Browns' owner, was about to seal his reputation as a master showman, and Mr. Delsing was about to become the answer to a baseball trivia question.
NEWS
May 10, 2006
Jim Delsing, 80, an outstanding defensive outfielder who played 10 seasons in the American League but was remembered mostly for his role in baseball's most famous stunt, died of complications from cancer Thursday at his home in Chesterfield, Mo. On Aug. 19, 1951, the last-place St. Louis Browns were playing the Detroit Tigers in the second game of a doubleheader at Sportsman's Park in St. Louis. Bill Veeck, the Browns' owner, was about to seal his reputation as a master showman, and Mr. Delsing was about to become the answer to a baseball trivia question.
SPORTS
By Don Markus | August 18, 1991
The photograph is one of baseball's Rockwells, its characters etched into memory: the umpire, Ed Hurley, squatting to get a better look at a very small strike zone. Detroit Tigers catcher Bob Swift, on his knees behind home plate, perhaps a smile cracking through his mask. And Eddie Gaedel, crouching at bat for the St. Louis Browns, his serious expression belying perhaps the most hysterical moment in major-league history.It happened 40 years ago tomorrow."It transcended baseball. Even people who didn't know anything about the game heard about it," Mary-Frances Veeck, the widow of Bill Veeck, who owned the Browns at the time, said last week from her home in Chicago.
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | August 26, 2001
AMID the grandeur that Major League baseball is bestowing on Cal Ripken Jr. during his final season as a player, a slight pause may be in order to remember one of the goofiest moments in the history of the Orioles' franchise -- the day a midget went to bat for the team's hapless progenitor, the lowly St. Louis Browns. This month marks the 50th anniversary of the day the wily Bill Veeck ("as in wreck," he used to say) sent in 3-foot, 7-inch Eddie Gaedel to bat for the Browns, assuring them a walk -- and baseball immortality for him. Even ABC News made note of the milestone, but failed to acknowledge that Veeck (who in later years talked about acquiring the Orioles)
SPORTS
By Don Markus | August 18, 1991
Eddie Gaedel might be the most famous midget ever to appear in a professional baseball game, but he was neither the first nor the most successful. Forty-six years before Gaedel's appearance in St. Louis, a local midget actor named Jerry Sullivan showed up in Baltimore in the uniform of the Buffalo Bisons.With the Bisons trailing their Eastern League opponents, 10-2, in the top of the ninth inning on Sept. 18, 1905, Sullivan was escorted to the plate by teammate Rube Kissinger. With no objections from plate umpire Charlie Simmer or Orioles manager Hugh Jennings, Sullivan faced Baltimore pitcher Fred Burchell.
SPORTS
August 18, 2001
AMERICAN LEAGUE Who's hot The Angels' 13-4 road record since the All-Star break is the best in the majors. Who's not Rick Reed has al lowed 39 hits in 19 1/3 innings with the Twins and has an ERA of 7.45. Line of the day Jeff Frye, Blue Jays third baseman AB R H RBI HR 4 2 4 3 1 NATIONAL LEAGUE Who's hot Darryl Kile of the Cardinals has given up six earned runs over his past 49 2/3 innings for a 1.09 ERA. Who's not The Pirates have lost nine of their past 11 games. Line of the day Jose Ortiz, Rockies second baseman AB R H RBI HR 5 3 3 4 3 AMERICAN LEAGUE He said it "Maybe we'll tie it and I'll have played for the two best teams."
SPORTS
By COMPILED FROM NEWS SERVICE AND WEB REPORTS | April 13, 2009
Don't want no short people? That might be fine for Randy Newman, but don't tell it to the York Revolution. The Atlantic League club is conducting what could be called Eddie Gaedel Version 2.0. During its spring training this week, the Revolution has invited Dave Flood to camp. Flood, who formerly worked for the Tampa Bay Rays, is 3 feet 2. The idea was sparked by research in a book by television producer Todd Gallagher, Andy Roddick Beat Me with a Frying Pan, who touts the effectiveness of having a pinch hitter basically guaranteed to walk every time he comes to the plate.
SPORTS
April 10, 1991
Minnie Minoso's bid to play professional baseball in a sixth decade was blocked yesterday when his contract with the Miami Miracle of the Florida State League was rejected by the commissioner's office.Minoso, 68, who last played in 1980, when he appeared in two games with the Chicago White Sox, had been working out at the White Sox's spring training complex in Sarasota, Fla. He was scheduled to appear as a designated hitter or pinch hitter in Saturday night's game between Miami and the Fort Lauderdale Yankees.
SPORTS
By Don Markus | August 18, 1991
The photograph is one of baseball's Rockwells, its characters etched into memory: the umpire, Ed Hurley, squatting to get a better look at a very small strike zone. Detroit Tigers catcher Bob Swift, on his knees behind home plate, perhaps a smile cracking through his mask. And Eddie Gaedel, crouching at bat for the St. Louis Browns, his serious expression belying perhaps the most hysterical moment in major-league history.It happened 40 years ago tomorrow."It transcended baseball. Even people who didn't know anything about the game heard about it," Mary-Frances Veeck, the widow of Bill Veeck, who owned the Browns at the time, said last week from her home in Chicago.
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel | August 29, 1999
Anyone can do it ESPN's way. Anyone can name the century's best athletes. David Hyde of the Sun-Sentinel of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., found it more interesting to pick the century's worst.The top 15 and selected others:1. Eddie "The Eagle" Edwards. Ski jumper was so bad the Olympics outlawed anyone like him.2. Rosie Ruiz. She took the ultimate in career short cuts at the Boston Marathon.3 1/3. Eddie Gaedel. "The best darn midget who ever played big-league ball," according to St. Louis Browns owner Bill Veeck.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker | February 27, 1991
The selection of Bill Veeck to baseball's Hall of Fame was a heart-stirring event to Baltimore Orioles general manager Roland Hemond, who worked for Veeck with the Chicago White Sox during 1975-80."
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