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Eddie Eagle

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NEWS
October 17, 1999
The recent decision by Carroll elementary school principals to hold off on putting the Eddie Eagle in the classroom was a mistake.It was not necessary to have Eddie Eagle in the classroom. This program is a 15-minute presentation that can easily be done in an assembly period. It does not require special preparation by teachers.All of the material is provided and it does not promote gun ownership. Not to use this program leaves our children with a major void in their safety training. We spend many hours teaching them to say "no" to drugs, not to drink and not to smoke.
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NEWS
May 22, 2005
School board administrative session is Tuesday The Carroll County Board of Education will hold an administrative meeting at 1 p.m. Tuesday in Room 007 of the board offices at 125 N. Court St., Westminster. A work session will be held at 2 p.m. on "Continuous improvement - identifying and implementing best practices." The agenda for the regular meeting will be posted on the school system Internet site at http://ccpl. carr.org/ccps/. Meetings will be broadcast live on CETV, Channel 21 on Adelphia cable TV, and repeated at 8 p.m. Thursday, Sunday and the next Thursday and at 9 a.m. Saturday.
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NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 14, 2000
A VERY BIG bird with an even bigger message paid a visit to second-graders at Runnymede Elementary School recently. No, it wasn't the Raven Bird or the Oriole Bird, mascots of the professional Baltimore teams that bear the same names. It was Eddie Eagle, who visited to teach children about gun avoidance. The program, sponsored by the National Rifle Association, teaches children not to touch guns. The Runnymede visit was the first time the program had been presented at a Carroll County public school.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2001
A gun safety education proposal relegated to the legislative version of life support earlier this week has been revived, meaning Maryland could soon become the first state to require schools to teach children in grades K-12 about firearms. Key lawmakers, the National Rifle Association and Marylanders Against Handgun Abuse say they support the latest version of the bill, and that they expect it to pass the full House and Senate before the General Assembly session adjourns April 9. Earlier this week, many legislators assumed the House bill was ready for passage.
NEWS
September 2, 1999
MANY PEOPLE may be wary of a gun safety program offered by the National Rifle Association to the Carroll County elementary schools. Some parents may object that there is no such thing as a safe firearm for young children. Others may find that a school-sanctioned program, replete with fuzzy animal mascot, stickers and coloring books, is a mere propaganda ploy of the gun lobby.With those reservations understood, the county school system should still take a hard look at the NRA's Eddie Eagle gun safety program.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1999
State's Attorney Jerry F. Barnes has enlisted support from Sheriff Kenneth L. Tregoning and Westminster VFW Post 467 to introduce a National Rifle Association gun safety and gun avoidance program into Carroll County's elementary schools.Called "Eddie Eagle" for its colorful mascot, the program promotes a concise message to children who find a gun: "Stop! Don't touch! Leave the area! Tell an adult!""Kids love Eddie, especially when he does his shuffle," said Kathy Cassidy, manager of the Eddie Eagle Firearms Safety program.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2001
A proposal to teach gun safety in schools was derailed in the General Assembly yesterday because of a disagreement over the role of a National Rifle Assocation-backed teaching program that features a smiling cartoon raptor called Eddie Eagle. Lawmakers in the House of Delegates and Senate have written legislation requiring schools to have gun education courses for children in kindergarten through the 12th grade, which would make Maryland the first state to require such a policy. The Senate bill passed 41-3.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2001
A gun safety education proposal relegated to the legislative version of life support earlier this week has been revived, meaning Maryland could soon become the first state to require schools to teach children in grades K-12 about firearms. Key lawmakers, the National Rifle Association and Marylanders Against Handgun Abuse say they support the latest version of the bill, and that they expect it to pass the full House and Senate before the General Assembly session adjourns April 9. Earlier this week, many legislators assumed the House bill was ready for passage.
NEWS
May 22, 2005
School board administrative session is Tuesday The Carroll County Board of Education will hold an administrative meeting at 1 p.m. Tuesday in Room 007 of the board offices at 125 N. Court St., Westminster. A work session will be held at 2 p.m. on "Continuous improvement - identifying and implementing best practices." The agenda for the regular meeting will be posted on the school system Internet site at http://ccpl. carr.org/ccps/. Meetings will be broadcast live on CETV, Channel 21 on Adelphia cable TV, and repeated at 8 p.m. Thursday, Sunday and the next Thursday and at 9 a.m. Saturday.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2000
Carroll County's experiment with teaching gun safety to public school students as part of the health program this year could become a model for others in Maryland. There has been little done statewide to teach children what to do if they find a gun or encounter one somewhere, said Ron Peiffer, Maryland's assistant superintendent for school and community outreach. In Carroll, a committee of school staff, working with crime victims and law-enforcement representatives, has devised a program for students from kindergarten to high school that deals with guns as a personal safety issue.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2001
A proposal to teach gun safety in schools was derailed in the General Assembly yesterday because of a disagreement over the role of a National Rifle Assocation-backed teaching program that features a smiling cartoon raptor called Eddie Eagle. Lawmakers in the House of Delegates and Senate have written legislation requiring schools to have gun education courses for children in kindergarten through the 12th grade, which would make Maryland the first state to require such a policy. The Senate bill passed 41-3.
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 14, 2000
A VERY BIG bird with an even bigger message paid a visit to second-graders at Runnymede Elementary School recently. No, it wasn't the Raven Bird or the Oriole Bird, mascots of the professional Baltimore teams that bear the same names. It was Eddie Eagle, who visited to teach children about gun avoidance. The program, sponsored by the National Rifle Association, teaches children not to touch guns. The Runnymede visit was the first time the program had been presented at a Carroll County public school.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2000
Carroll County's experiment with teaching gun safety to public school students as part of the health program this year could become a model for others in Maryland. Little has been done statewide to teach children what to do if they find a gun or encounter one somewhere, said Ron Peiffer, Maryland's assistant superintendent for school and community outreach. In Carroll, a committee of school staff, working with crime victims and law-enforcement representatives, has devised a program for students from kindergarten to high school that deals with guns as a personal safety issue.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2000
Carroll County's experiment with teaching gun safety to public school students as part of the health program this year could become a model for others in Maryland. There has been little done statewide to teach children what to do if they find a gun or encounter one somewhere, said Ron Peiffer, Maryland's assistant superintendent for school and community outreach. In Carroll, a committee of school staff, working with crime victims and law-enforcement representatives, has devised a program for students from kindergarten to high school that deals with guns as a personal safety issue.
NEWS
October 17, 1999
The recent decision by Carroll elementary school principals to hold off on putting the Eddie Eagle in the classroom was a mistake.It was not necessary to have Eddie Eagle in the classroom. This program is a 15-minute presentation that can easily be done in an assembly period. It does not require special preparation by teachers.All of the material is provided and it does not promote gun ownership. Not to use this program leaves our children with a major void in their safety training. We spend many hours teaching them to say "no" to drugs, not to drink and not to smoke.
NEWS
September 2, 1999
MANY PEOPLE may be wary of a gun safety program offered by the National Rifle Association to the Carroll County elementary schools. Some parents may object that there is no such thing as a safe firearm for young children. Others may find that a school-sanctioned program, replete with fuzzy animal mascot, stickers and coloring books, is a mere propaganda ploy of the gun lobby.With those reservations understood, the county school system should still take a hard look at the NRA's Eddie Eagle gun safety program.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2000
Carroll County's experiment with teaching gun safety to public school students as part of the health program this year could become a model for others in Maryland. Little has been done statewide to teach children what to do if they find a gun or encounter one somewhere, said Ron Peiffer, Maryland's assistant superintendent for school and community outreach. In Carroll, a committee of school staff, working with crime victims and law-enforcement representatives, has devised a program for students from kindergarten to high school that deals with guns as a personal safety issue.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2000
Beginning this school year, Carroll County public schools will experiment with a gun-safety program that will be taught as part of the health program to students from kindergarten through high school. The program will be a mixture of the National Rifle Association's Eddie Eagle cartoon character program - minus the cartoon character - and the STAR program, Straight Talk About Risks, run by the Center to Prevent Handgun Violence. A Carroll committee also added elements. "The message is very, very plain and noncontroversial," said William J. Piercy, assistant supervisor of health and staff development for Carroll schools, who has been working with the committee of educators, victims of gun violence and a Maryland State Police officer.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1999
State's Attorney Jerry F. Barnes has enlisted support from Sheriff Kenneth L. Tregoning and Westminster VFW Post 467 to introduce a National Rifle Association gun safety and gun avoidance program into Carroll County's elementary schools.Called "Eddie Eagle" for its colorful mascot, the program promotes a concise message to children who find a gun: "Stop! Don't touch! Leave the area! Tell an adult!""Kids love Eddie, especially when he does his shuffle," said Kathy Cassidy, manager of the Eddie Eagle Firearms Safety program.
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