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Eddie Cheever

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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | May 22, 1992
INDIANAPOLIS -- The final day of practice for Sunday's Indianapolis 500 came and went without mishap yesterday.Mario Andretti, driving his Lola/Ford Cosworth XB, was fastest on the track, hitting 226.409 mph.Andretti's front-row mates in Sunday's 76th annual Indianapolis 500 also were among the top five fastest. Eddie Cheever clocked 224.921, and pole-sitter Roberto Guerrero notched 224.899 mph.Arie Lyuendyk (225.423) and Michael Andretti (225.220) showed they were up to speed with the second and third fastest laps of the day.*Driver relief: Drivers were feeling somewhat better about the new caution rules after a drivers meeting yesterday, where the U.S. Automobile Club announced it will continue the 100-mph speed limit on pit road.
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By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 28, 2000
INDIANAPOLIS - Eddie Cheever is too old and his racing portfolio too extensive and too impressive for him to serve as "poster boy" for an Indy Racing League that remains adrift in unfulfilled aspirations. Tony Stewart emerged from Midwest short-oval proving grounds to fulfill that role. But he won an IRL championship and bolted for NASCAR Winston Cup racing. No other young hero has surfaced from the grass-roots upbringing Indianapolis Motor Speedway president Tony George envisioned upon his 1996 IRL launch in conflict with the established CART open-wheel series.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1996
INDIANAPOLIS -- IndyCar driver Scott Brayton died from a fracture at the base of his skull, according to autopsy results released yesterday.Robert L. Ward, chief deputy coroner of Marion County, released the results at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, a week after Brayton's death.Brayton, 37, died from the injury incurred during a crash last Friday while practicing for the Indianapolis 500. Brayton, who would have been the pole-sitter for Sunday's race, was buried Wednesday in his hometown of Coldwater, Mich.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1998
INDIANAPOLIS -- The first time Eddie Cheever came to the Indianapolis 500 and the place they call The Speedway, it terrorized him."I didn't start my career thinking of ovals," said Cheever, a 40-year-old American who grew up in Europe. "I thought I'd win the Formula One race at Monaco."The first time I came here [1990], I didn't understand the speed. I'm still learning ovals. When I first came here, they warned me about the wall, but they'd call it 'the fence.' When I saw it, I said, 'That's not a fence; that's a wall.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1998
INDIANAPOLIS -- The first time Eddie Cheever came to the Indianapolis 500 and the place they call The Speedway, it terrorized him."I didn't start my career thinking of ovals," said Cheever, a 40-year-old American who grew up in Europe. "I thought I'd win the Formula One race at Monaco."The first time I came here [1990], I didn't understand the speed. I'm still learning ovals. When I first came here, they warned me about the wall, but they'd call it 'the fence.' When I saw it, I said, 'That's not a fence; that's a wall.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | May 23, 1992
INDIANAPOLIS -- Eddie Cheever bounds into the motor home parked next to the garage area. His face is tanned. He runs his fingers through his brownish-blond hair, revealing a streak of gray.He smiles, boyishly."I have a passion for competing," he says, settling into a comfortable position on one of the couches lining the walls. "I love competing. I don't really like testing very much, or qualifying very much. But I love racing. Racing is so exciting, because every thing happens immediately.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | May 26, 1992
INDIANAPOLIS -- A day after one of the most accident-ridden Indianapolis 500s in history, driver Bobby Rahal voiced embarrassment at the performance of his peers."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | May 23, 1992
INDIANAPOLIS -- It is going to be the garage sale of all garage sales.A.J. Foyt announced yesterday that the general public will be allowed to get its hands on 35 years of his racing history, valued at an estimated $5 million.Included in the lot is Foyt's 1977 Coyote Indy-winning car, complete with Foyt Engine, in running condition."All this stuff is in the horse barns down in Houston," Foyt said. "There's so much of it, I just can't keep it all up. It's just going to waste sitting there, and I hate to see that, so I might as well share it with some people who are going to appreciate it."
SPORTS
By Robert Markus and Robert Markus,Chicago Tribune | May 19, 1992
INDIANAPOLIS -- He has been coming here for more than a quarter-century and has seen many changes. He has seen speeds go from 160 mph to more than 230. He has seen competition grow keener, the cars grow leaner, the crashes meaner.But the one thing that has remained almost constant has been his luck.If there's one thing Mario Andretti would like to see one more time before he retires, it's the checkered flag at the end of the Indianapolis 500. He saw it once, but it was so long ago it's almost buried in the mist of memory.
SPORTS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 28, 2000
INDIANAPOLIS - Eddie Cheever is too old and his racing portfolio too extensive and too impressive for him to serve as "poster boy" for an Indy Racing League that remains adrift in unfulfilled aspirations. Tony Stewart emerged from Midwest short-oval proving grounds to fulfill that role. But he won an IRL championship and bolted for NASCAR Winston Cup racing. No other young hero has surfaced from the grass-roots upbringing Indianapolis Motor Speedway president Tony George envisioned upon his 1996 IRL launch in conflict with the established CART open-wheel series.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1996
INDIANAPOLIS -- In less time than it takes to gulp, fate struck the Indianapolis 500 and car owner John Menard a brutal blow and opened the way for one of the most fascinating driver combinations ever to start this race, a race that is quite possibly already the most denigrated 500 on record.When the 80th edition takes the green flag today -- minus most of the recognized big names in the sport -- Menard's rookie driver, Tony Stewart, 25, the Wunderkind who is supposed to be the next great star, will be on the pole.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1996
INDIANAPOLIS -- IndyCar driver Scott Brayton died from a fracture at the base of his skull, according to autopsy results released yesterday.Robert L. Ward, chief deputy coroner of Marion County, released the results at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, a week after Brayton's death.Brayton, 37, died from the injury incurred during a crash last Friday while practicing for the Indianapolis 500. Brayton, who would have been the pole-sitter for Sunday's race, was buried Wednesday in his hometown of Coldwater, Mich.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | May 26, 1992
INDIANAPOLIS -- A day after one of the most accident-ridden Indianapolis 500s in history, driver Bobby Rahal voiced embarrassment at the performance of his peers."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | May 23, 1992
INDIANAPOLIS -- Eddie Cheever bounds into the motor home parked next to the garage area. His face is tanned. He runs his fingers through his brownish-blond hair, revealing a streak of gray.He smiles, boyishly."I have a passion for competing," he says, settling into a comfortable position on one of the couches lining the walls. "I love competing. I don't really like testing very much, or qualifying very much. But I love racing. Racing is so exciting, because every thing happens immediately.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | May 23, 1992
INDIANAPOLIS -- It is going to be the garage sale of all garage sales.A.J. Foyt announced yesterday that the general public will be allowed to get its hands on 35 years of his racing history, valued at an estimated $5 million.Included in the lot is Foyt's 1977 Coyote Indy-winning car, complete with Foyt Engine, in running condition."All this stuff is in the horse barns down in Houston," Foyt said. "There's so much of it, I just can't keep it all up. It's just going to waste sitting there, and I hate to see that, so I might as well share it with some people who are going to appreciate it."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | May 22, 1992
INDIANAPOLIS -- The final day of practice for Sunday's Indianapolis 500 came and went without mishap yesterday.Mario Andretti, driving his Lola/Ford Cosworth XB, was fastest on the track, hitting 226.409 mph.Andretti's front-row mates in Sunday's 76th annual Indianapolis 500 also were among the top five fastest. Eddie Cheever clocked 224.921, and pole-sitter Roberto Guerrero notched 224.899 mph.Arie Lyuendyk (225.423) and Michael Andretti (225.220) showed they were up to speed with the second and third fastest laps of the day.*Driver relief: Drivers were feeling somewhat better about the new caution rules after a drivers meeting yesterday, where the U.S. Automobile Club announced it will continue the 100-mph speed limit on pit road.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1996
INDIANAPOLIS -- In less time than it takes to gulp, fate struck the Indianapolis 500 and car owner John Menard a brutal blow and opened the way for one of the most fascinating driver combinations ever to start this race, a race that is quite possibly already the most denigrated 500 on record.When the 80th edition takes the green flag today -- minus most of the recognized big names in the sport -- Menard's rookie driver, Tony Stewart, 25, the Wunderkind who is supposed to be the next great star, will be on the pole.
SPORTS
August 26, 1991
DENVER -- Al Unser Jr. blew away from the rest of the 24-car field yesterday to win his second straight Texaco-Havoline Grand Prix and move solidly into the race for the Indy-car championship.Unser never was headed, holding off a mild challenge from Emerson Fittipaldi at the end to win his second race of the season and the 17th of his career.Michael Andretti finished third, cutting Bobby Rahal's CART PPG Cup points lead to 141-132. Rahal's engine blew on lap 28. Unser moved to third with 129 points after 12 of 17 races.
SPORTS
By Robert Markus and Robert Markus,Chicago Tribune | May 19, 1992
INDIANAPOLIS -- He has been coming here for more than a quarter-century and has seen many changes. He has seen speeds go from 160 mph to more than 230. He has seen competition grow keener, the cars grow leaner, the crashes meaner.But the one thing that has remained almost constant has been his luck.If there's one thing Mario Andretti would like to see one more time before he retires, it's the checkered flag at the end of the Indianapolis 500. He saw it once, but it was so long ago it's almost buried in the mist of memory.
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