Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEddie Brown
IN THE NEWS

Eddie Brown

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 4, 1997
Eddie Brown was wrapping up a phone call when a colleague rushed into his office."I just got off the phone with a Fortune 50 company, and they would like to come in Monday. Guess who?" Keith A. Lee asked."Narrow it down geographically," said Brown, president of Brown Capital Management Inc., a Baltimore-based money-management firm."Northeast.""Texaco!" Brown answered instantly.Lee, a portfolio manager with the firm, took the phone call on Thursday afternoon, Nov. 14, 10 days after the White Plains, N.Y., oil giant was swept up in a firestorm involving alleged racism.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2013
Baltimore is home to some generous souls. There are those who give time, others who share their ideas and plenty of people willing to open their wallets. Over the years, a number of people have built reputations as philanthropists. Yet however publicly they give, their reasons for doing so are often strikingly personal. Here are a few of their stories: Edward St. John EdwardSt. John learned something about giving in college. When he was a senior, a freshman wanted his help campaigning to become class president.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Dan Berger | January 9, 2002
This congressional election year, we can all move past the trendy fad of national unity. Maryland's state colleges are among the nation's least affordable. And best, right? Let's scour the world for nations weak or willing enough to carry the war on terrorism to. Eddie Brown is a role model for all Baltimore financiers. The Ravens' chief skill is staying alive for one more week. Long may that suffice.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2012
When the Four Seasons Baltimore opened last year on the downtown waterfront, it became one of the city's most expensive hotels, with rooms starting at $279 per night. Now a local development group plans to open a boutique hotel featuring rooms that will be far more pricey - averaging nearly $650 a night - in a part of town away from the harbor and not known for commanding such rates. The $16 million project, called The Ivy, is planned to open by spring 2014 inside the former Inn at Government House property at Calvert and Biddle streets in Mount Vernon.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2003
Eddie and Sylvia Brown couldn't be happier with how the Enoch Pratt Free Library plans to house the African-American collection named in their honor. "It exceeded my expectations," said Eddie Brown, while looking over the new reading room last week. "This is sensational, beautiful space. Top shelf." The room is part of a new four-story annex to the central Pratt library that will open officially today. Some of the library's most valued collections, including the personal books and papers of H.L. Mencken, will be stored in the annex, making them more accessible to the public.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1997
Brown Capital Management Inc., a Baltimore-based money management firm, has been chosen by the state of Maryland to manage $100 million in retirement and pension fund assets.Brown Capital manages more than $2.5 billion in assets. Its largest clients include the California Public Employees' Retirement System, the State of Connecticut Pension Plan and the Oregon State Pension Retirement System.The firm is headed by Eddie C. Brown, who is known as a stock-picking expert. Brown is a panelist on "Wall Street Week With Louis Rukeyser."
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | October 7, 1998
At the three-quarter pole, who is leading our Dow Jones forecasting contest?Of a record 2,500 postcards received and the Dow average closing Sept. 30 at 7,842.62, here are results:Closest is Melinda Carl at 7,841. ("Good times won't roll forever; we're due for a correction.")L Runner-up is Ann F. Gamse at 7,845. ("I just took a guess.")When the contest began in January, the Dow stood at 7,870. Of those who entered, 80 percent predicted a higher year-end close than the Dow's current level.
SPORTS
By PATRICK GUTIERREZ | February 9, 2008
"I feel the [Erik Bedard] trade is moving us in the right direction. I think Andy MacPhail is doing the same blueprint as he did in Minnesota." Tony Spinnichio, Baltimore "I think they are doing what they always do: get one good pitcher and get rid of him." Bob Mitchell, Canton "I like it. I think [second baseman Brian] Roberts should go next. If you're going to rebuild, do it right." Dan Stachowski, Baltimore "As long as they continue to rebuild the team, then I'm all for it." Jason Presson, Baltimore "It looks good for the future of the team, but we should have kept [Bedard]
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 21, 2004
In a move to forge new bonds with the African-American community, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra announced yesterday a partnership with the Soulful Symphony and its founder, Darin Atwater, who was named the BSO's new composer-in-residence. BSO president-elect James Glicker said the "history-making event" will open the doors of Meyerhoff Symphony Hall "to those who have felt left out." Founded in 2000, the Soulful Symphony has a core of 65 African-American musicians, drawn from the Baltimore/Washington area, as well as New York and Philadelphia.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | January 20, 2008
A SELL-OUT CROWD OF about 2,000 people filled the ballroom at Martin's West for the 20th Annual Fullwood Foundation Inc. Benefit & Recognition Breakfast. But this year, there was a notable exception. This was the first event after the death of co-founder Harlow Fullwood Jr. last January. Sure, the general atmosphere was one of warmth and community. But many there also felt a certain void. "Particularly in my case, it's an empty feeling because I worked closely with him. I co-authored his autobiography," said Fullwood Foundation volunteer Herbert C. Sledge Jr., as he ushered the morning's honorees into a separate room for the breakfast's opening procession.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | July 22, 2009
Four Marylanders who helped transform Baltimore's historic Bromo Seltzer Tower into artists' studios are exploring plans to restore another city property, the Inn at Government House. The Baltimore Development Corp. has selected Government House LLC, a team that includes father-and-son developers Martin and Tony Azola of Azola & Associates and philanthropists Sylvia and Eddie Brown, to receive a negotiating privilege that will give them time to come up with plans for redeveloping the three-building complex at 1125 to 1129 N. Calvert St. The selection comes eight months after the city sought proposals from developers interested in buying or leasing the 21-room inn, considered the city's official guesthouse.
SPORTS
By PATRICK GUTIERREZ | February 9, 2008
"I feel the [Erik Bedard] trade is moving us in the right direction. I think Andy MacPhail is doing the same blueprint as he did in Minnesota." Tony Spinnichio, Baltimore "I think they are doing what they always do: get one good pitcher and get rid of him." Bob Mitchell, Canton "I like it. I think [second baseman Brian] Roberts should go next. If you're going to rebuild, do it right." Dan Stachowski, Baltimore "As long as they continue to rebuild the team, then I'm all for it." Jason Presson, Baltimore "It looks good for the future of the team, but we should have kept [Bedard]
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | January 20, 2008
A SELL-OUT CROWD OF about 2,000 people filled the ballroom at Martin's West for the 20th Annual Fullwood Foundation Inc. Benefit & Recognition Breakfast. But this year, there was a notable exception. This was the first event after the death of co-founder Harlow Fullwood Jr. last January. Sure, the general atmosphere was one of warmth and community. But many there also felt a certain void. "Particularly in my case, it's an empty feeling because I worked closely with him. I co-authored his autobiography," said Fullwood Foundation volunteer Herbert C. Sledge Jr., as he ushered the morning's honorees into a separate room for the breakfast's opening procession.
NEWS
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | April 16, 2006
Eddie and Sylvia Brown have hung the provocative artwork in a can't-miss-it spot in their Glen Arm home, giving them ample opportunity to ponder its message. The piece, by African-American artist Betye Saar, features three washboards hung vertically, each with a poignant image of old, tired washerwomen primed to tackle the day's laundry. The work's title is imprinted in bold lettering: Lest We Forget, Upon Whose Shoulders, We Now Stand. "Every day when we head to our garage," said Eddie Brown, "it's there."
NEWS
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN REPORTER | October 22, 2005
Local arts supporters Sylvia and Eddie Brown are jump-starting a long-stalled effort to convert Baltimore's historic Bromo Seltzer tower to artists' studios by participating in a public-private partnership that would enable them to purchase the 94-year-old building from the city. Under the agreement, which Mayor Martin O'Malley is scheduled to announce Monday, the city would sell the building at 15 S. Eutaw St. for $1 to a newly formed company that would transform the 15-story tower into 15 to 20 artists' studios.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 21, 2004
In a move to forge new bonds with the African-American community, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra announced yesterday a partnership with the Soulful Symphony and its founder, Darin Atwater, who was named the BSO's new composer-in-residence. BSO president-elect James Glicker said the "history-making event" will open the doors of Meyerhoff Symphony Hall "to those who have felt left out." Founded in 2000, the Soulful Symphony has a core of 65 African-American musicians, drawn from the Baltimore/Washington area, as well as New York and Philadelphia.
NEWS
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | April 16, 2006
Eddie and Sylvia Brown have hung the provocative artwork in a can't-miss-it spot in their Glen Arm home, giving them ample opportunity to ponder its message. The piece, by African-American artist Betye Saar, features three washboards hung vertically, each with a poignant image of old, tired washerwomen primed to tackle the day's laundry. The work's title is imprinted in bold lettering: Lest We Forget, Upon Whose Shoulders, We Now Stand. "Every day when we head to our garage," said Eddie Brown, "it's there."
NEWS
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN REPORTER | October 22, 2005
Local arts supporters Sylvia and Eddie Brown are jump-starting a long-stalled effort to convert Baltimore's historic Bromo Seltzer tower to artists' studios by participating in a public-private partnership that would enable them to purchase the 94-year-old building from the city. Under the agreement, which Mayor Martin O'Malley is scheduled to announce Monday, the city would sell the building at 15 S. Eutaw St. for $1 to a newly formed company that would transform the 15-story tower into 15 to 20 artists' studios.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2003
Eddie and Sylvia Brown couldn't be happier with how the Enoch Pratt Free Library plans to house the African-American collection named in their honor. "It exceeded my expectations," said Eddie Brown, while looking over the new reading room last week. "This is sensational, beautiful space. Top shelf." The room is part of a new four-story annex to the central Pratt library that will open officially today. Some of the library's most valued collections, including the personal books and papers of H.L. Mencken, will be stored in the annex, making them more accessible to the public.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 18, 2002
William Walters and his son, Henry, spent much of their lives in the late 19th and early 20th century buying works of art, sometimes by the ship load. They purchased illuminated manuscripts, suits of armor and medieval and Renaissance paintings. What the Baltimore-born industrialists overlooked were works by African-American artists. Now with the purchase of a marble bust of a 19th-century abolitionist and an impressionist landscape of Boston, the Walters Art Museum - built around the collection bequeathed to the city by Henry Walters in 1931 - will include art by two African-American artists.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.