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Eddie Adams

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NEWS
By Myrna Oliver and Myrna Oliver,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 20, 2004
Eddie Adams, whose Pulitzer Prize-winning photo of a Vietnamese officer executing a Viet Cong prisoner in the streets of Saigon became an enduring symbol of the brutality of the Vietnam War, died yesterday in his New York home. He was 71. Mr. Adams died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, known as Lou Gehrig's disease, his assistant, Jessica Stuart, told the Associated Press. In May, he received a diagnosis of a rapid strain of the incurable neurological disorder and quickly lost his speech and became increasingly incapacitated.
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NEWS
August 3, 2006
On July 31, 2006, BEULAH E. ADAMS, age 86, of Monkton, MD, passed away at Barbara J. Egan Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Shrewsbury, PA. Mrs. Adams was born on June 26, 1920 in White Hall, MD. Wife of the late Julius Adams, mother of Eddie Adams, Walter Adams and his wife Susie, Rodger Adams and his wife Viola and Michael Adams. Also survived by numerous grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces, nephews and many special friends. Beulah was preceded in death by two sons Joseph and Robert Adams and her brother Lewis Troyer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Christopher Assaf and Christopher Assaf,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2004
It was the best photojournalism experience of my life and I have Eddie Adams to thank for it. Famous for his Pulitzer Prize-winning 1968 photograph of a South Vietnamese official's street execution of a Viet Cong prisoner, Adams had a long and decorated photography career. He was highly respected within the industry for his talent, work ethic and dedication to perfection. Last Sunday, at age 71, he died of ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease). In 1988, at his Jeffersonville farm in the picturesque mountains of New York, Adams founded The Eddie Adams Workshop, nicknamed "Barnstorm" for the building he converted into a lecture hall and offices.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christopher Assaf and Christopher Assaf,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2004
It was the best photojournalism experience of my life and I have Eddie Adams to thank for it. Famous for his Pulitzer Prize-winning 1968 photograph of a South Vietnamese official's street execution of a Viet Cong prisoner, Adams had a long and decorated photography career. He was highly respected within the industry for his talent, work ethic and dedication to perfection. Last Sunday, at age 71, he died of ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease). In 1988, at his Jeffersonville farm in the picturesque mountains of New York, Adams founded The Eddie Adams Workshop, nicknamed "Barnstorm" for the building he converted into a lecture hall and offices.
NEWS
August 3, 2006
On July 31, 2006, BEULAH E. ADAMS, age 86, of Monkton, MD, passed away at Barbara J. Egan Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Shrewsbury, PA. Mrs. Adams was born on June 26, 1920 in White Hall, MD. Wife of the late Julius Adams, mother of Eddie Adams, Walter Adams and his wife Susie, Rodger Adams and his wife Viola and Michael Adams. Also survived by numerous grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces, nephews and many special friends. Beulah was preceded in death by two sons Joseph and Robert Adams and her brother Lewis Troyer.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | December 2, 2001
COLLEGE PARK - Junior running back Barrington Edwards gained 147 yards and scored on touchdown runs of 18 and 11 yards yesterday as Bowie defeated Prince George's County rival, Eleanor Roosevelt, 23-6, in the Class 4A championship game, giving the Bulldogs their first state football title. A 35-27 loser to Roosevelt (12-1) in the regular season, Bowie (11-2) built a 17-0 lead thanks to a defense led by Terry Everett (two interceptions, one in the end zone), Eddie Adams (fumble recovery, sack)
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 31, 1997
Does size matter?When it comes to movies, it can't hurt. And when it comes to "Boogie Nights," a sprawling epic documenting the life and death of the 1970s, it is more than given its due.Filmed with brash exuberance by 27-year-old director Paul Thomas Anderson, and filled with career-defining performances,"Boogie Nights" gives the Hollywood star-making fable a seedy touch by setting it in the tawdry world of pornographic film.Audacious in its subject matter, unapologetically referential in its cinematic approach, "Boogie Nights" is a full-frontal travelogue through the louche carnality of the 1970s, a paean to porn, disco and other discredited cultural forms.
NEWS
By Linda White and Linda White,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1998
It was the shot seen round the world. Even today, 30 years later, the photograph of the summary street-corner execution of a Viet Cong prisoner by a South Vietnamese general remains perhaps the most enduring image of the Vietnam War.So precise was the timing of Associated Press photographer Eddie Adams that the executioner's bullet can be seen as it emerges from the head of the victim. The photograph won the Pulitzer Prize for 1969. Some say it also altered America's support for the war. And it forever changed the lives of the photographer and the subject.
NEWS
By Christopher T. Assaf and Christopher T. Assaf,Staff Photographer | June 8, 2008
Happy Snaps That's how Bill Eppridge signed my starting-to-get-tattered copy of his new book A Time It Was: Bobby Kennedy in the Sixties. It is a tad ironic, the book ending with such a sad note - the death of Robert F. Kennedy at the hands of an assassin and the funeral. Something Eppridge has lived with for 40 years. That is how this business moves; the professional photojournalist often compartmentalizing strong emotion and constantly clinging to a facade of detachment. Look to the future and not continuously dwell on the past.
NEWS
By Linda White | July 17, 1998
NGUYEN NGOC Loan died on Tuesday. In many ways his life was unremarkable. He was a Vietnamese refugee, failed restaurateur, husband and father. But one instant, captured on film 30 years ago, catapulted him into the spotlight and made him a symbol of the brutality and moral bankruptcy of the Vietnam War.At the height of the Tet offensive, Mr. Loan executed a Viet Cong prisoner by firing point-blank into the bound man's brain. As he explained in later years, the prisoner was not a nameless civilian, as had been stated in the press, but the commander of a Viet Cong guerrilla unit.
NEWS
By Myrna Oliver and Myrna Oliver,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 20, 2004
Eddie Adams, whose Pulitzer Prize-winning photo of a Vietnamese officer executing a Viet Cong prisoner in the streets of Saigon became an enduring symbol of the brutality of the Vietnam War, died yesterday in his New York home. He was 71. Mr. Adams died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, known as Lou Gehrig's disease, his assistant, Jessica Stuart, told the Associated Press. In May, he received a diagnosis of a rapid strain of the incurable neurological disorder and quickly lost his speech and became increasingly incapacitated.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | December 2, 2001
COLLEGE PARK - Junior running back Barrington Edwards gained 147 yards and scored on touchdown runs of 18 and 11 yards yesterday as Bowie defeated Prince George's County rival, Eleanor Roosevelt, 23-6, in the Class 4A championship game, giving the Bulldogs their first state football title. A 35-27 loser to Roosevelt (12-1) in the regular season, Bowie (11-2) built a 17-0 lead thanks to a defense led by Terry Everett (two interceptions, one in the end zone), Eddie Adams (fumble recovery, sack)
NEWS
By Linda White and Linda White,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1998
It was the shot seen round the world. Even today, 30 years later, the photograph of the summary street-corner execution of a Viet Cong prisoner by a South Vietnamese general remains perhaps the most enduring image of the Vietnam War.So precise was the timing of Associated Press photographer Eddie Adams that the executioner's bullet can be seen as it emerges from the head of the victim. The photograph won the Pulitzer Prize for 1969. Some say it also altered America's support for the war. And it forever changed the lives of the photographer and the subject.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 31, 1997
Does size matter?When it comes to movies, it can't hurt. And when it comes to "Boogie Nights," a sprawling epic documenting the life and death of the 1970s, it is more than given its due.Filmed with brash exuberance by 27-year-old director Paul Thomas Anderson, and filled with career-defining performances,"Boogie Nights" gives the Hollywood star-making fable a seedy touch by setting it in the tawdry world of pornographic film.Audacious in its subject matter, unapologetically referential in its cinematic approach, "Boogie Nights" is a full-frontal travelogue through the louche carnality of the 1970s, a paean to porn, disco and other discredited cultural forms.
TOPIC
September 26, 2004
The World More than a year after becoming China's president, Hu Jintao was handed the full reins of power when his predecessor, Jiang Zemin, gave up the nation's most powerful military post. The move ends a power-sharing arrangement that has seen two rival camps maneuvering for position as China faces major foreign and domestic policy challenges, such as relations with Taiwan, North Korea's nuclear program, government corruption and dealing with rapid economic growth. Iran defied the United Nations by announcing that it had begun converting tons of uranium into the gas needed to turn the radioactive element into nuclear fuel.
SPORTS
By From Staff Reports | May 22, 1993
Ryan Lambert threw a four-hitter and drove in the winning run in the eighth inning to lead Paint Branch (13-6) past Westminster (13-4), 2-1, in a Class 4A, Region I semifinal.Westminster left-hander Chris Archambault allowed seven hits. Brad Gibson hit a 400-foot home run in the top of the seventh for Westminster. Second-seeded Paint Branch, which is seeking its third state title in four years, plays at No. 1 Gaithersburg in the regional championship today at 1:30 p.m.* Edgewood 8, North Caroline 7: Senior Timmy Hughes scored the winning run on a North Caroline (14-5)
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