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By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | January 26, 2003
I have been plagued with nummular eczema for years. It does not respond to Benadryl, prednisone or any kind of topical cortisone ointment. I read in your column about some doctors in Japan who had people with eczema drink oolong tea to help their symptoms. So the last time I had an outbreak, I tried oolong tea, and the results were amazing. Within 24 hours, the itching and inflammation were gone. It took a couple of days, but the lesions disappeared and didn't leave scars. Why does oolong tea work so well?
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Linda L. Esterson | November 27, 2012
Most new parents dream of their newborns with 10 fingers and 10 toes, and pretty, soft new baby skin. But as they grow, children can experience some very common skin conditions - some with an easy fix, and others a little more complex. Eleven-month-old Marilyn Katzen was diagnosed with eczema at a few months old. Like most babies, she could grow out of the condition. But she may not. “You want your little girl to look beautiful, and her skin is blotchy and red,” says her mom, Debby Katzen, who lives in Pikesville.
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NEWS
July 27, 2009
Eczema is the name for a group of skin diseases characterized by dry sensitive skin; red, scaly rashes; and severe troubling itch. Dr. Mark Lowitt, a dermatologist at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, discusses the condition: * The most common type of eczema, called atopic dermatitis, is seen in both children and adults, and often occurs in people with a personal or family history of allergic disease such as hay fever, allergies, or asthma. * The most remarkable symptom of eczema is itch.
NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon | November 23, 2009
Question: : Do you know about the "wet pajama" treatment for childhood eczema? Wet a pair of cotton pajamas and wring them out. Put them on the child, then layer a pair of dry fleece pajamas over the top. Leave both pairs of pajamas on overnight. The child's body heat creates a layer of high humidity that hydrates the skin. As a physician, I treat older patients, but this approach cleared our son's severe eczema in three days. Answer: : Thanks for sharing this unusual treatment.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | January 11, 2004
I am a 51-year-old woman who has been plagued with persistent eczema. The skin on my hands was always red, itchy, cracked and often bleeding. My hands were always covered with bandages or gauze. Dermatologists prescribed cortisone creams of increasing strength. None was helpful in the long term. Hand cream for dry skin was useless. Five years ago, I went to an allergist for an unrelated problem. When he saw my hands, he was concerned that the open sores put me at risk of infection. He suggested taking borage oil, since it had helped many of his patients.
NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon | November 23, 2009
Question: : Do you know about the "wet pajama" treatment for childhood eczema? Wet a pair of cotton pajamas and wring them out. Put them on the child, then layer a pair of dry fleece pajamas over the top. Leave both pairs of pajamas on overnight. The child's body heat creates a layer of high humidity that hydrates the skin. As a physician, I treat older patients, but this approach cleared our son's severe eczema in three days. Answer: : Thanks for sharing this unusual treatment.
FEATURES
Linda L. Esterson | November 27, 2012
Most new parents dream of their newborns with 10 fingers and 10 toes, and pretty, soft new baby skin. But as they grow, children can experience some very common skin conditions - some with an easy fix, and others a little more complex. Eleven-month-old Marilyn Katzen was diagnosed with eczema at a few months old. Like most babies, she could grow out of the condition. But she may not. “You want your little girl to look beautiful, and her skin is blotchy and red,” says her mom, Debby Katzen, who lives in Pikesville.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | May 1, 2005
I cannot believe you would write about magnetic bracelets for arthritis. This is just a bunch of nonsense designed to loosen the purse strings of gullible readers. I am surprised you would give credence to any "study" of this nonsense. This bunk should be consigned to the trash can. We agree that magnet therapy seems far-fetched, but just because we don't understand how something works doesn't mean we should ignore it. The well-designed study you refer to was published in the British Medical Journal (Dec.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | March 10, 2002
Q. I have rosacea, a skin condition that gives me a red nose and cheeks. My dermatologist says it can only be treated by taking tetracycline, which upsets my stomach. After a few weeks on the antibiotic, the rosacea gets better. But when I stop the drug, the redness comes back. My neighbor told me he had heard that taking two full tablespoons of salsa daily would control rosacea. I started on salsa a month ago, just as the rosacea was returning. The salsa seems to have held the condition off, since my nose is not red or itching as usual.
NEWS
By Marsha King and Marsha King,SEATTLE TIMES | March 11, 2005
Sara Cole and Bill Barnes are raising their two children the so-called natural way. They eat fresh organic, whole foods. They use naturopathic physicians. They turn first to herbs to treat health problems. At night, they all sleep in one room. Their lifestyle is commonly called "natural family living." It can touch every aspect of life, not only health care and diet, but activities and play, choices in schooling and styles of nurturing. "There are lots of us out there," says Cole, 35, a stay-at-home mom from Seattle who finds support and advice from like-minded parents across the country on the Internet several times a day. There's no single right way to carry out natural family living.
NEWS
July 27, 2009
Eczema is the name for a group of skin diseases characterized by dry sensitive skin; red, scaly rashes; and severe troubling itch. Dr. Mark Lowitt, a dermatologist at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, discusses the condition: * The most common type of eczema, called atopic dermatitis, is seen in both children and adults, and often occurs in people with a personal or family history of allergic disease such as hay fever, allergies, or asthma. * The most remarkable symptom of eczema is itch.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | May 1, 2005
I cannot believe you would write about magnetic bracelets for arthritis. This is just a bunch of nonsense designed to loosen the purse strings of gullible readers. I am surprised you would give credence to any "study" of this nonsense. This bunk should be consigned to the trash can. We agree that magnet therapy seems far-fetched, but just because we don't understand how something works doesn't mean we should ignore it. The well-designed study you refer to was published in the British Medical Journal (Dec.
NEWS
By Marsha King and Marsha King,SEATTLE TIMES | March 11, 2005
Sara Cole and Bill Barnes are raising their two children the so-called natural way. They eat fresh organic, whole foods. They use naturopathic physicians. They turn first to herbs to treat health problems. At night, they all sleep in one room. Their lifestyle is commonly called "natural family living." It can touch every aspect of life, not only health care and diet, but activities and play, choices in schooling and styles of nurturing. "There are lots of us out there," says Cole, 35, a stay-at-home mom from Seattle who finds support and advice from like-minded parents across the country on the Internet several times a day. There's no single right way to carry out natural family living.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | January 11, 2004
I am a 51-year-old woman who has been plagued with persistent eczema. The skin on my hands was always red, itchy, cracked and often bleeding. My hands were always covered with bandages or gauze. Dermatologists prescribed cortisone creams of increasing strength. None was helpful in the long term. Hand cream for dry skin was useless. Five years ago, I went to an allergist for an unrelated problem. When he saw my hands, he was concerned that the open sores put me at risk of infection. He suggested taking borage oil, since it had helped many of his patients.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | January 26, 2003
I have been plagued with nummular eczema for years. It does not respond to Benadryl, prednisone or any kind of topical cortisone ointment. I read in your column about some doctors in Japan who had people with eczema drink oolong tea to help their symptoms. So the last time I had an outbreak, I tried oolong tea, and the results were amazing. Within 24 hours, the itching and inflammation were gone. It took a couple of days, but the lesions disappeared and didn't leave scars. Why does oolong tea work so well?
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | March 10, 2002
Q. I have rosacea, a skin condition that gives me a red nose and cheeks. My dermatologist says it can only be treated by taking tetracycline, which upsets my stomach. After a few weeks on the antibiotic, the rosacea gets better. But when I stop the drug, the redness comes back. My neighbor told me he had heard that taking two full tablespoons of salsa daily would control rosacea. I started on salsa a month ago, just as the rosacea was returning. The salsa seems to have held the condition off, since my nose is not red or itching as usual.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | July 3, 2005
I would like to point out a side effect of allergy medications that contain pseudoephedrine for nasal decongestion. Taking Claritin D left me completely unable to fall asleep. I was literally up all night with a racing heartbeat. I was so sleep-deprived that I couldn't work. I finally read the warning about nervousness, dizziness or sleeplessness. I called my doctor, who said I should switch to plain Claritin (without a decongestant). On this drug, I sleep like a baby. I urge anyone with insomnia to check all medications for pseudoephedrine.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON | March 23, 2009
I have been on so many cholesterol-lowering drugs I have nearly lost count. Crestor, Lipitor, Zetia and Zocor all give me terrible pains in my shoulders, back and arms. I also have had dreadful muscle cramps in my calves, especially at night. I don't know how much longer I can stand taking Crestor, but my doctor just says that without it I'm a heart attack waiting to happen. Is there any natural way to lower cholesterol? I want to stay healthy, but the pain interferes with my ability to exercise and has affected my quality of life.
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