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NEWS
July 5, 2013
We would like Catonsville to know what a wonderful thing the Catonsville Girls Softball League did for two tiny villages along the southern coast of Ecuador. They donated enough used and new softball equipment to outfit two girls' teams in one of the poorest parts of the country. We publicly thank the girls and their families for their generous donations, with heartfelt gratitude to Catherine and Chuck Kreis for their selfless efforts which made this possible. Play It Again Sports contributed many new gloves and balls to this project and we thank them, too. Jonathan, our son and a Catonsville resident, is a Peace Corps volunteer stationed in Puerto del Morro, where he works in the children and family program in several local communities.
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NEWS
By Joel Brinkley | July 10, 2013
Edward Snowden has wrought more damage on the United States than any private individual in recent memory. It's not just the theft and publication of classified material. That was bad enough because those disclosures make the U.S. look hypocritical and deceitful. The revelations are infuriating America's allies and rivals alike. But the 30-year-old's fervid attempts to find asylum are also setting off escalating rounds of anger and recrimination -- all of that aimed at Washington, too. Just one example: When Bolivian President Evo Morales left an energy conference in Moscow, Spain charged that he was smuggling Snowden out of the country to give him asylum.
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NEWS
By Alejandro Portes | October 12, 1990
IN QUITO, the capital of Ecuador, a fancy meal for two can be had for less than $20, a taxi ride across town costs about $2, and a bottle of the excellent local rum $3. The country is a tourist paradise, especially for holders of the elsewhere battered dollar.The government is hoping that more than tourists will come to the Andes, and to achieve this goal, it has passed a new law allowing U.S. and other foreign companies to set up shop importing duty-free all that they need to produce goods for re-export.
NEWS
July 5, 2013
We would like Catonsville to know what a wonderful thing the Catonsville Girls Softball League did for two tiny villages along the southern coast of Ecuador. They donated enough used and new softball equipment to outfit two girls' teams in one of the poorest parts of the country. We publicly thank the girls and their families for their generous donations, with heartfelt gratitude to Catherine and Chuck Kreis for their selfless efforts which made this possible. Play It Again Sports contributed many new gloves and balls to this project and we thank them, too. Jonathan, our son and a Catonsville resident, is a Peace Corps volunteer stationed in Puerto del Morro, where he works in the children and family program in several local communities.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2001
Manuel Jaramillo, the consul of Ecuador in Baltimore, died Wednesday of complications from pneumonia at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 80 and lived in Charles Village. For the past 21 years, he had assisted Ecuadoreans here while representing the business and maritime interests of his country. Remembered for his immaculate attire, exuberant hospitality and social graces, he often entertained visitors from South America and introduced them to Baltimoreans in the home he restored in the 2900 block of N. Charles St. "He was a gourmet cook who found great excitement and enjoyment in food," said Fran Hershfield, a friend who lives in Sparks.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,Contributing Writer | April 10, 1994
To the people of Ecuador, Tamara G. Fesche might seem to be an angel.Mrs. Fesche is the executive director of ECUAdent, a program that enlists volunteers in the dental profession to aid poor people in foreign countries. She and 23 health care professionals spent 10 days in March in the Ecuadorean villages of Latacunga and Salcedo, treating children who get little dental care.The group included oral surgeons, dentists, nurses, technicians, hygienists and dental assistants. Each participated as a volunteer.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 26, 1995
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina -- About 75 tons of arms from Argentina, which is a mediator in the border dispute between Ecuador and Peru, were illegally sold to Ecuador during its brief war with Peru over the region last month.Argentina's deputy foreign minister, Fernando Petrella, said that the government had been duped by arms traffickers into signing what officials thought was an agreement to sell the weapons -- 105- and 155-mm cannon, rifles, pistols, heavy machine guns and mortars -- to Venezuela for $34 million.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 19, 1992
GENEVA -- Ecuador's decision to leave OPEC reflects the spirit of the post-Cold War era in which monopolistic and socialist policies have unraveled to make room for freer trade and Western free enterprise.Ecuador will be the first country in the 13-member oil cartel to leave since the group's founding 32 years ago. The decision, announced Thursday night, deals another blow to an organization that has seen its market power wane steadily for nearly a decade and is still reeling from depressed oil prices, rising energy taxes and a successful anti-pollution campaign to restrain the use of oil.What's more, most members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, led by Saudi Arabia, have been producing as much oil as they wish, rendering the cartel useless as a price-setting group.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1997
Sam's Army, that gang of noisy, red-clad, U.S. national soccer team fanatics, already has its tickets -- in Section 21, out in the clanky, scoreboard-end bleachers at Memorial Stadium.Ecuador's team is in town, lacking its two best-known players and all but incommunicative about the rest. And the U.S. team, a hungry Plan B squad if ever there was one, will definitely show up.So, at 7: 30 tonight (ESPN), international soccer returns to Baltimore, 25 years to the month since its last appearance, with a friendly match trimmed in question marks.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | August 8, 1997
After 14 hours of travel Monday, about three hours of practice since, and then 83 minutes of cautious play last night, Ecuador seemed an unlikely winner at Memorial Stadium.But a breakaway goal with about seven minutes remaining, one that the U.S. team unanimously called an off-side play, resulted in a 1-0 exhibition victory for Ecuador.On- or off-side, however, no whistle blew, and 13,629 fans at the first international match in Baltimore in 25 years went almost silent as the ball rolled into the net -- against the grain of play.
NEWS
June 26, 2013
The Edward Snowden who once said he was prepared to "take his lumps" for releasing secret U.S. documents is now rethinking his position ("Snowden stays put in Moscow," June 25). This self-styled crusader for freedom and transparency is desperately trying to get to Ecuador, a dictatorship with little if any freedom of the press. And Mr. Snowden's travel plans seem anything but transparent. Perhaps he has realized that his fleeting bit of fame isn't exactly what he had hoped. Perhaps the "national dialogue" on security and surveillance that he said he wanted to start - with himself as the Great Moderator - isn't working out as he thought.
SPORTS
Sports on TV | October 11, 2011
TUESDAY'S TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS F1 Japanese Grand Prix (T) SPEEDNoon MLB NLCS, Gm. 2: St. Louis@Milwaukee (T) MLB1 ALCS, Gm. 3: Texas@Detroit 45, 57:30 C. foot. Texas Christian@San Diego State (T) CBSSN6 a.m. Southern Mississippi@Navy (T) CBSSN4 Oklahoma vs. Texas (T) ESPNUMidnight Miami@Virginia Tech (T) ESPNU2 a.m. Missouri@Kansas State (T)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 26, 2010
John W. Ford, a retired accountant who earlier had been a career non-commissioned Army officer, died Nov. 17 of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 70. The son of a drugstore owner and a homemaker, Mr. Ford was born and raised in Columbus, Ga. He was a 1958 graduate of Columbus High School. He joined the Army in 1960 where he attained the rank of chief warrant officer. Mr. Ford was assigned to the communication section of the defense attaché and worked in embassies in Bolivia, Vietnam, India, Burma, Ecuador and Switzerland.
FEATURES
By Kenneth Turan and Kenneth Turan,Tribune Newspapers | November 13, 2009
"Crude" sounds like the standard "this is an outrage" environmental degradation documentary, the latest in a line that includes "An Inconvenient Truth" and films about the deaths of the oceans, the evaporation of water, the murder of dolphins, even the disintegration of dirt. "Crude" fits that bill, but it is something considerably more interesting as well. The outrage in question is the subject of a class action suit filed by 30,000 residents of Ecuador against Chevron, the world's fifth-largest corporation, alleging that 18 billion gallons of toxic wastewater were dumped into the Amazon between 1972 and 1990, fatally poisoning the land and water and sickening inhabitants.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 30, 2008
BOGOTA, Colombia -- Files provided by Colombian officials from computers they say were captured in a cross-border raid in Ecuador on March 1 appear to tie Venezuela's government to efforts to secure arms for Colombia's largest insurgency. Officials taking part in Colombia's investigation of the computers provided The New York Times with copies of more than 20 files, some of which also showed contributions from the rebels to the 2006 campaign of Ecuador's leftist president, Rafael Correa.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | April 20, 2007
Federal customs agents seized $3 million worth of cocaine hidden in a cargo ship from Ecuador and docked at Baltimore's main port, officials announced yesterday. Agents discovered the cocaine during a random search Monday of the containerized cargo on the vessel Alianca Shanghai. Michael Hrinyak, the customs agency's security director at the port, said it was one of the largest cocaine seizures at the Baltimore port in recent years. A contraband enforcement team with the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Anti-Terrorism found 310 pounds of cocaine on the ship after a drug-sniffing dog alerted authorities.
NEWS
February 13, 1997
COMIC OPERA is a relatively benign resolution of a constitutional crisis when the alternatives are civil war, anarchy or dictatorship. If there is a hero in Ecuador's crisis, which saw three claimants to the presidency where one was too many, it was the armed forces under Gen. Paco Moncayo, for refusing to take over and for compelling politicians to bargain politically.Abdala Bucaram is removed for "mental incapacity" from the presidency he won last July with 54 percent of the vote; Vice President Rosalia Arteaga was the country's first woman president, briefly; Congress named its leader, Fabian Alarcon, to succeed as interim president until a fresh election on Aug. 10, 1998.
NEWS
By Chris Kraul and Chris Kraul,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 16, 2006
QUITO, Ecuador -- Banana billionaire Alvaro Noboa edged left-wing economist Rafael Correa in the presidential election's first round yesterday, setting up a runoff between two candidates who are bitter rivals and polar opposites, according to early results. With nearly two-thirds of the ballots tabulated, Noboa polled 26.8 percent, and Correa had 22.4 percent, according to electoral authorities. Noboa, whose family owns Ecuador's largest banana plantation, closed what many pollsters saw as a 5- or 6-percentage-point deficit with Correa in the campaign's final days.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 21, 2004
WASHINGTON - The U.S. Commerce Department lowered tariffs on $1.7 billion worth of shrimp imports from Thailand, India, Ecuador and Brazil yesterday, potentially lowering prices for America's most popular seafood. Thailand, the largest exporter of shrimp to the United States, faces average duties of as much as 6 percent, down from a 10.3 percent preliminary tariff proposed in July after the United States determined that Thai companies were illegally "dumping" exports at below-market prices.
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