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December 11, 2010
My neighbor might be an endangered species. No, not a Democrat. A real, not-many-of-you-fellas-left critter in trouble. Smaller than a grain of white rice and just as colorless, Kenk's amphipod lives in small springs and seeps into my portion of Montgomery County known as Inside the Beltway. It looks like a shrimp, although "you'd probably have to eat all the ones in existence to make a meal," says Dan Feller, a Department of Natural Resources biologist who spends his time trying to find living things that almost aren't anymore.
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BUSINESS
Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
Baltimore cyber security firm RedOwl Analytics plans to double its workforce to 50 people within the next few years as it tries to make Federal Hill Maryland's new technology hub, company CEO Guy Filippelli said Tuesday. Hot off securing $4.6 million during its first round of venture fundraising last month, RedOwl has also won praise from Gov. Martin O'Malley, who stopped by the company's Light Street headquarters to celebrate the start-up's success. O'Malley called the company an example of the "a growing ecosystem of innovation" in Maryland.
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NEWS
By Bonita Formwalt and Bonita Formwalt,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 1996
WHEN SCIENCE teacher Mary Ann Buckley wanted her Marley Middle School students to explore the environment, she took them out the door and down the street to neighboring Marley Creek. There, her seventh-grade students studied a fragile ecosystem and its struggle to maintain a balance between nature and progress.For the students it was a chance to observe as scientists a body of water they pass every day en route to school. Seining for insects and testing for chemicals, the students gathered samples of water from sites near the creek's headwaters.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
When Kay McConnell's daughter moved with the rest of her classmates into Friends School's new middle-school building, the kids seemed out of sorts in the unfamiliar space. It was as if they missed the coziness of the cramped quarters that had been their home. Like the students, the trees that had been planted in the ground around the new structure didn't look happy either. McConnell, a lifelong and self-taught gardener, offered to try to help the plants, at least, feel comfortable in their new space.
NEWS
By Alston Chase | January 16, 1996
IN MANY CULTURES, beliefs about nature form the bedrock of what people believe about ethics, politics and social life.One might cite as examples the natural-law tradition that dominated political thinking during the Middle Ages, the state-of-nature theories of the Enlightenment or the evolutionary theories of the 19th century. For much of American history, the dominant political consensus could be traced to British philosopher John Locke's ideas about a rational humanity and a benevolent nature.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1999
The last time a large area of Soldiers Delight Natural Environment Area was set on fire was in 1730, when the Susquehannock Indians burned it to flush white-tail deer from the woods. The charred woods gave rise to grasslands, but with the decline of the area's American Indian population, the ecosystem died.Yesterday, in an effort to restore the lost grasslands environmental system and the endangered plants it produces, state Department of Natural Resources officials began burning 100 acres in the western Baltimore County park.
NEWS
February 26, 1996
THE ABUNDANT natural splendor of the Florida Everglades is a unique national heritage that must be protected, not drained and polluted to support agriculture and development that has pushed this fragile ecosystem to the verge of collapse.President Clinton's $1.5 billion plan to reclaim 120,000 acres of farmland bordering Everglades National Park and to re-engineer the compromised network of rivers and lakes in South Florida to increase natural freshwater flow is the most ambitious ecological restoration plan in recent history.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | March 5, 1991
THURMONT -- Nowhere in Maryland is the impact of the state's burgeoning deer herd more visible than at Catoctin Mountain Park.Thought to be capable of supporting 125 to 175 deer, the heavily wooded, 5,700-acre mountain preserve in Frederick County is under assault from an estimated 400 to 800 hungry deer.The damage isn't immediately visible to casual visitors. In fact, except for the Camp David presidential retreat, Catoctin is probably best known for its abundant deer. More than a half-million people visit the national park each year, many just to catch a glimpse of deer.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | October 6, 2006
Taking in the water gleaming through trees changing colors in the October light, Sally Brucker was mesmerized during her first visit to the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center grounds. "I don't want to leave. I'm so happy there are no shopping malls," said Brucker, an art therapist from Takoma Park. At the high-powered government facility, they will be happy to have her back. SERC, as the Edgewater campus is known, is opening its doors wider than ever. A slew of new fall programs designed to educate visitors on the fragile beauty of the Chesapeake Bay's estuarine ecosystem is expanding public access to the pristine former tobacco plantation.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Walter Adey has dominion over the tides and wind and rain.He decides when the sun will rise and set, whether the days will be cool or hot, and when a storm will blow through and send the hermit crabs scurrying for cover beneath the sandy banks of the bay.In the basement of the Smithsonian Institution, Mr. Adey has created one of the world's largest and most elaborate models of an ecosystem -- with winds, tides, sunshine, salt marshes and...
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 1, 2014
A record expansion of Maryland's "wildlands" passed the General Assembly Tuesday, as the House of Delegates gave final approval to an O'Malley administration priority to designate nealry 22,000 acres of sensitive state-owned lands as legally protected wilderness areas. The measure, previously passed by the Senate, creates nine new wildlands and expands 14 existing ones in nine counties across the state.  The largest tracts are in rural western Maryland and on the Eastern Shore. But there's even one in the heavily developed Baltimore area - an addition to Soldiers Delight, an ecologically rich swath of rocky soil and grassy savanna in Owings Mills that naturalists say is the largest ecosystem of its type on the East Coast.
NEWS
January 31, 2014
Consider not only the good news, but the overarching theme that was conveyed in the recent editorial, "Building a more entrepreneurial Maryland" (Jan. 27): Those of us who are determined to make Maryland a top-notch home for starts-ups and businesses of all kinds are working together toward this goal like never before. We are determined. Clearly, our legislators and Gov. Martin O'Malley are making a concerted effort to bolster diverse job growth, while advocacy groups like the Greater Baltimore Committee and TEDCO have created forums to move the discussion forward.
NEWS
By Alison Prost | April 30, 2013
Stormwater is the only source of pollution to local waterways that is growing. There has been much talk lately of stormwater fees as a "rain tax. " While catchy, the moniker really doesn't tell the story. The story begins when those raindrops hit parking lots, roads and other paved surfaces. As they flow downhill, they pick up pollution - oil and grease from automobiles, fertilizer from our yards, and dog waste that wasn't picked up. That pollution flows into storm drains, then into local streams and creeks, then into local rivers.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2013
Leading a tour of the Soldiers Delight area of western Baltimore County on Sunday afternoon, Paula Becker, an ecologist with Maryland's Department of Natural Resources, was pleased to report the first blooming of serpentine chickweed - a plant as rare as it is splashy in spring. And while that might not constitute earth-shattering news, it is certainly reassuring to those monitoring the health of the plant. Serpentine chickweed grows in the shallow serpentine soil of the strange, hilly grasslands of the Soldiers Delight Natural Environment Area, at 2,000 acres the largest remaining ecosystem of its kind in the country.
NEWS
July 9, 2011
We applaud Sen. Ben Cardin's courageous opposition to the pesticides bill now before the U.S. Senate ("Cardin opposes break on pesticide," July 4). This proposal would cancel the Environmental Protection Agency's permit program limiting the amount and types of pollutants discharged into waterways and threaten the Chesapeake Bay. Without definite limits on hazardous pesticides, it will be impossible to keep Maryland's streams and rivers free of toxic chemicals. Without the permit program, 95 percent of our streams will continue to show pesticide pollution, and the majority of our aquatic communities will be exposed to complex mixtures of chemical contaminants that have the potential for harm.
NEWS
By Wayne T. Gilchrest | March 21, 2011
Few experiences compare to boating in the Chesapeake Bay at dawn, gliding among blue herons and submerged oak trees. As a nature lover and conservationist, I often take young students to the Chesapeake to teach them about ocean ecology. Lately, these nascent outdoorsmen have been noticing disturbances in the complex chain of marine life that sustains the ocean and its estuaries. An alarming 70 percent of adult striped bass sampled in the Chesapeake Bay are infected with a serious condition called mycobacteriosis, and these ailing fish are migrating from their nursery in the bay all along the Atlantic Coast.
NEWS
By Chip Ward | September 30, 2010
Wolves, as you have undoubtedly heard, are once again thriving in Yellowstone. The 66 trapped in Canada and released in Yellowstone and the Idaho wilderness in 1995-96 have generated more than 1,700 wolves. To the delight of scientists and tourists — and the dismay of many ranchers — more than 200 wolf packs exist in the area today. Courts and government agencies are still sorting out how the wolves should be managed. But one thing is abundantly clear: The reintroduction has succeeded in ways that extend far beyond the health of the wolves themselves.
NEWS
By ASCRIBE NEWS SERVICE | April 23, 2001
GLOUCESTER POINT, Va. - Scientists at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science will soon launch a three-year project to develop a model for multi-species management of sustainable fisheries within the Chesapeake Bay. Bay fisheries traditionally have been managed on a species-by-species basis, with management plans that do not take into account factors such as the abundance of competitors, predators and forage species. With a $629,000 grant from the Virginia Environmental Endowment, scientists at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science will try a new approach that will consider the entire ecosystem and be based on the development of a food web model for the lower Chesapeake Bay. Scientists know that populations of commercially important fish are greatly affected by the abundance of their prey, their predators and their competitors.
NEWS
By Charles Stek | February 24, 2011
The America's Great Outdoors report, introduced by President Barack Obama last week, is a bold promise to strengthen Americans' connection to their greatest treasure: their waterways, forests, fields and urban parks. The plan would better target conservation dollars; coordinate federal, state and local programs; and fully fund the nation's primary source for conservation, the Land and Water Conservation Fund, with $900 million from gas and oil drilling royalties. It would use that fund not just for the conservation of grand natural features such as Yellowstone National Park, but for the development of new urban green spaces, the conservation of working ranches, farms and forests; the expansion of public access to the nation's rivers and new watertrails called blueways; and the restoration of major ecological systems.
SPORTS
December 11, 2010
My neighbor might be an endangered species. No, not a Democrat. A real, not-many-of-you-fellas-left critter in trouble. Smaller than a grain of white rice and just as colorless, Kenk's amphipod lives in small springs and seeps into my portion of Montgomery County known as Inside the Beltway. It looks like a shrimp, although "you'd probably have to eat all the ones in existence to make a meal," says Dan Feller, a Department of Natural Resources biologist who spends his time trying to find living things that almost aren't anymore.
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