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By Jay Hancock | December 9, 2009
P oliticians don't want to hear it, but bribing businesses to hire people won't do much to lower unemployment or get the economy growing. That doesn't stop them. Elected officials, who take credit for the sun rising and the movement of the tides, have to look like they're doing "something" - something that seems related to the economy and that gnat-brained citizens will remember next year when they vote. On Monday, at a "small-business summit," Gov. Martin O'Malley proposed a $3,000 tax credit next year for each unemployed Marylander companies hire.
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By E. Albert Reece | December 30, 2012
The spending cuts associated with the impending fiscal cliff - known more technically as sequestration - hold potentially ominous consequences for the U.S. economy, and for Maryland in particular, if the White House and Congress cannot strike a deal soon to avert them. The "sequestration" clause of the Budget Control Act of 2011 triggers an approximately 8 percent across-the-board cut in federal discretionary spending. Although all states in the U.S. are likely to be harmed, perhaps no state will be more adversely affected than Maryland, with its high concentration of bioscience and federal employees.
NEWS
January 3, 1994
With the arrival of a new year, the American economy seems to be on a solid projectory from a technical recovery to a real one marked by consumer and business confidence. The consensus is that gross domestic product will grow somewhat more than 3 percent while inflation stays low and unemployment actually dips below the 6 percent mark. Shadows on the horizon are across the seas, in Japan and Europe, where a dismal outlook means less demand for U.S. exports and an increasing trade deficit for this country.
NEWS
September 13, 2012
Former President Bill Clinton told the Democratic National Convention that President Obama has a plan to rescue the economy but that Republicans have stood in his way. From this you might think that the economy requires government intervention to create jobs. But history tells a different story. For the first 150 years of this country's existence, the federal government felt no great need to "do something" when the economy turned down. One of the last "do-nothing" presidents was Warren G. Harding.
NEWS
By BILL BISHOP | August 6, 1992
Lexington, Kentucky. -- The economy, according to Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan, is on the way to a slow but steady recovery.The economy, according to a far more reliable indicator, is still firmly ensconced in the Dumpster.I refer here, of course, to the local country radio station. The songs coming out of that box are a sight better at telling the truth about money than any number of economists.(George Bernard Shaw was dead right when he noted that ''if all economists were laid end to end they would not reach a conclusion.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | June 1, 1993
CALL it "The Invertebrate Economy."In today's economy, almost nothing is very reliable for very long. A generation ago, people could take jobs in large, stable companies, or public agencies, with some confidence that the employer would stay put.Cities and towns, in turn, had some confidence that their tax bases would not evaporate.Middle-class families, whose health insurance typically depended on the breadwinner's job, could trust that their coverage was secure year to year.Companies planning to invest overseas knew that an English pound would equal $2.80 for more than an overnight, and that their banker would not go bust.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | November 6, 1992
BILL Clinton will take office with high hopes and good will, but his presidency will stand or fall on whether he fixes the economy. His first task is to sort out the long-term "change" he champions from the short-term economic urgencies.As John Maynard Keynes aptly observed, "In the long run we are all dead." It is the short run where people are losing jobs, homes and hopes. And Mr. Clinton will soon lose his political mandate if recovery is not forthcoming. Mr. Clinton courageously resisted the fashionable (and mistaken)
NEWS
January 13, 2013
I find Thomas F. Schaller's call for an increase in the federal gas tax very disconcerting ("Gas tax increase long overdue," Jan. 9). Just because he teaches political science doesn't give him the expertise to conclude that an increase in the federal gas tax is overdue. Did he at any time mention an increase in the tax would be detrimental to the economy? No, he did not. Did he consider the impact on the citizenry of the U.S. and how it would impact the cost of every purchase? No, he did not. At this point in this anemic recovery, another tax increase (Obamacare, Social Security increases)
NEWS
October 10, 1991
Right there in the midst of Maryland's searing financial crisis are hugely important structural changes that will dictate the pace and timing of economic recovery.So says a study released last week by two University of Maryland economists. Though unemployment has been far less debilitating this time around than in previous downturns, the UM researchers predict the state will have a tougher time shrugging off this recession.The once-welcome shift from a manufacturing to service economy now is perversely retarding recovery.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Jean.Marbella@baltsun.com | April 23, 2009
It is human - or perhaps just journalistic - nature to think we can explain the inexplicable. We take all the horrifying details that tumble from first one murder-suicide that wipes out an entire family and then unbelievably a second one - the sunny yellow house, the 10th-floor hotel room, the three little tykes, the two sisters, the mom who blogged and the one who volunteered - and we grasp for a universal string theory that will tie the who-what-where-when-and-how to...
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