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NEWS
October 25, 2011
Dan Reed's argument that job creation requires the government to just get out of the way makes little sense ("Government's job: stay out of the way, Oct. 19). Economists agree that the three most important things the government can do to create long-term jobs and re-energize the economy are to invest in infrastructure, education and scientific research. All three are essentially governmental functions. And our principal global competitors, China, India and Brazil, are investing a far greater share of their wealth in these areas than we. Studies have shown that a dollar invested in road repair and construction will yield a 12 percent return from reduced accidents, fuel consumption and time-killing travel delays.
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EXPLORE
July 8, 2011
After reviewing my 2011 real property tax bill, I see an increase in the amount of tax I am being assessed resulting from a reduction in the homestead tax credit by 5 percent. This automatic annual increase will continue each year until my homestead tax credit is eliminated. Why hasn't the Howard County Council addressed this issue and eliminated this automatic annual increase in real property taxes until the economy improves? As a retired senior citizen I haven't seen an increase in income for two years, but I must continue paying more taxes for the same services.
NEWS
June 9, 2011
It is time to dispel a few myths. First, we are not overtaxed but under-taxed . Federal personal and corporate tax receipts expressed as a percentage of gross domestic product are at 14.1 percent, the lowest rate since 1951. The Bush tax cuts have been in effect for a decade, but they have not stimulated the economy. Interest rates at the Federal Reserve are effectively zero, but corporations are not borrowing for expansion. The top income tax rate of 35 percent is lower than what we experienced under Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush, Richard Nixon andDwight D. Eisenhower.
NEWS
May 3, 2012
I read with great interest the Brookings Institution study on job creation in the Baltimore region reported in The Sun on April 23 ("'Next economy' envisioned for Baltimore area"). The study was admirable for its call to action - a robust effort on the part of all key stakeholders to create jobs for the "next economy" and for a comprehensive inventory of education and workforce training resources to prepare our citizens for these jobs. As this collective effort gets underway, there is a segment of low income residents that cannot be neglected - the over 8,000 ex-offenders who return to Baltimore City, and many more to the greater metropolitan area, every year after their incarceration.
NEWS
March 14, 2012
I have to totally agree with Susan Reimer 's assertion that Democrats must be living in a lovely dream waiting for the November elections ("Women will remember in November," March 12). True, some Republican presidential hopefuls have come down with foot in mouth disease, and there seems to be no shortage of eyebrow raising sound bites coming from the endless parade of televised debates. However, it's not the gaffes or the "I shouldn't have said that" moments that are making Democrats salivate for the coming elections but the realization that once again, the women's vote will lock onto a single issue and make it a major election point.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | August 13, 2011
In the late 1800s, while observing the width of peas, the height of men and the speed of homing pigeons, Sir Francis Galton came to a profound and comforting conclusion: Things return to normal. The forces that move the world do not like extremes. Hurricanes and droughts don't define the weather. Nor do 9 percent unemployment, a decade of stock stagnation and cash of $1 trillion sitting idle in corporate treasuries define the U.S. economy. I do not mean to dismiss the country's terrible situation or predict an imminent turnaround.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2010
The owner of a Western Maryland camp says strict new storm water rules are crippling his business. A winemaker complains that state loan guarantee programs aren't helping him secure credit to fund renovations to his vineyard. Another businessman can't understand why he has to pay such high costs for unemployment insurance. "I hear this every day," Republican former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. told the employers who gathered for the small-business round table he hosted recently in Hagerstown.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2012
With the presidential election in full swing and Congress mired in gridlock, President Barack Obama used his third State of the Union address Tuesday to sound a populist message on the economy, outlining a series of policies he said would give the middle class "a fair shot" at prosperity. Highlighting the nation's widening gap between rich and poor, Obama told a joint session of Congress that the nation must do more to reverse the decades-long slide of manufacturing jobs, streamline an unwieldy federal tax code and make college more affordable for millions of American workers.
NEWS
By John Karabias | November 25, 2012
For Maryland businesses, the seemingly never-ending political season and the cloud of economic uncertainty that accompanied it were supposed to have subsided at election's end. However, just as we thought we had put the campaign season behind us, impending dangers to Maryland's economy have emerged in the form of the so-called "fiscal cliff. " The cuts to defense and non-defense discretionary spending that comprise half of the fiscal cliff (or sequestration process) would have a devastating and disproportionate effect on Maryland.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2010
Chemical maker W.R. Grace said quarterly earnings increased 6.9 percent as it cut costs and improved profit margins despite operating under bankruptcy in a weak economy. The Columbia-based company, which has about 1,100 workers in the area, posted net income of $46.4 million, or 63 cents per share, for the quarter ended Dec. 31. That was compared to $43.4 million, or 60 cents per share, for the same period a year ago. The company attributed positive earnings to cost-cutting and realignment of its product portfolio.
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