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By Louis Galambos | January 18, 2010
I srael will not be complicit in a second Holocaust. If Iran or any other nation that has called for the destruction of Israel is about to acquire nuclear weapons, the Israelis will attempt to destroy that nation's uranium-enrichment facilities. In June 1981, Israel launched a successful air attack on an Iraqi nuclear reactor, and in 2007 it bombed a Syrian factory suspected of producing plutonium warheads. But Americans should be aware that when Iran becomes the next target, it will be a blow to the U.S. economic recovery.
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NEWS
By Peter Morici | October 7, 2014
Despite another seemingly good jobs report, President Barack Obama's approval rating is lower than a snake's belly, and Republicans could retake the Senate in November. Missteps in the Ukraine, Iraq and elsewhere weigh on voters' minds, but the economy - especially the jobs picture - is not as healthy as Mr. Obama claims. The president has managed to increase employment 5.5 million - or about 4 percent. But measured against other presidents facing similar challenges, his performance is hardly stellar.
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BUSINESS
Jay Hancock | October 19, 2010
Maryland and most other states outlaw "pay for performance" for political lobbyists for a very good reason. Experience has shown, going back to an 1853 case involving a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad lobbyist and the Virginia Legislature, that rewarding business agents for achieving short-term goals induces them to break the rules. It's OK for lobbyists to earn a salary, courts have found. But paying them bonuses for legislative approval of specific bills — "success fees," they're called — creates temptations for corner-cutting and sleaze that even the pols in Annapolis found extreme.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | October 1, 2014
I was in Seattle recently to congratulate union and community organizers who helped that city enact the first $15-per-hour minimum wage in the country. Other cities and states should followSeattle's example. Contrary to the dire predictions of opponents, the hike won't cost Seattle jobs. In fact, it will put more money into the hands of low-wage workers who are likely to spend almost all of it in the vicinity. That will create jobs. Conservatives believe the economy functions better if the rich have more money and everyone else has less.
NEWS
January 13, 2014
Here we go again. Yet another letter to the editor ("Illegal immigrants steal American jobs," Jan. 3) blaming undocumented immigrants for all of Maryland's employment and economic problems. And, like all such letters, its argument instantly breaks up once it makes contact with the facts. Contrary to popular belief, many "illegal" immigrants entered the country lawfully and only fell out of lawful status because of the complexity and expense of trying to navigate an immigration system that is almost designed not to work for anyone.
NEWS
October 23, 2011
I wonder how commentary like Dan Reed's recent op-ed on job creation ("Government's main job: staying out of the way," Oct. 20) can get so much attention. While the title has merit, the writer makes an anti-government case with empty assertions. The principal argument appears to be founded on a dictionary definition of "job. " If only life were so simple. Contrary to oversimplified views of economics, the government plays a critical role in our economy. Perhaps many have heard of the Internet, or maybe the integrated circuit, or the interstate highway system.
NEWS
November 25, 2011
I recently attended a community meeting to discuss the proposed CSX rail facility ("Price tags put on intermodal sites," Nov. 16). I came away with a clear understanding of the positive impact this facility would have on our economy. In such tough economic times, how can we turn down any opportunities to bring thousands of jobs into our area? I sincerely hope that local residents, the county and those with the railroad can work together to make this proposal a reality. Robyn Sadler, Ellicott City
NEWS
October 12, 2011
It was refreshing to read Peter Morici's recent commentary regarding trade with China ("China currency bill: America fights back," Oct. 11). After nearly three years of a failing economy presided over by the Obama administration, it would seem President Barack Obama should jettison his current economic team and hire economists like Professor Morici who provide a different point of view as to what ails the economy and what solutions should be undertaken....
NEWS
June 14, 2012
In regard to The Sun's editorial on Barack Obama's view of the private sector ("Doing better than 'fine," June 12), yes, President Obama should be encouraging, and yes, we can absolutely do better. But he must be honest. I keep hearing the private sector has created 4.3 million jobs in last three years. That may be true, but how many jobs have been lost? How many more people are unemployed now than three years ago? Why doesn't the actual unemployment rate (including those who are underemployed and those who have dropped out)
NEWS
September 21, 2010
The Sun published a feel-good article on the latest report from the Commerce Department's Bureau of Economic Statistics, starting, "Personal income in Maryland has collectively risen back out of the hole the recession dug. " ("Incomes in state up from '08 slide," Sept. 21) What the article failed to mention was the report's statement that professional services made the largest contribution to the non-farm earnings growth (and if I read the tables right, there was no farm contribution)
NEWS
By Perry L. Weed | October 1, 2014
The Federal Reserve, the nation's central bank, was established by Congress to regulate the money supply - that is, the value of the dollar, credit and interest rates. And for years now, it has undertaken extraordinary and unprecedented actions to lift the economy out of the Great Recession and to boost recovery. Recent efforts have included keeping the key short-term interest rate at zero and engaging in "quantitative easing," an aggressive program of buying bonds and mortgage-backed securities and thereby pumping trillions of dollars in liquidity into the financial markets.
NEWS
By Matthew Bobrowsky | September 26, 2014
Now that Congress is back from its summer recess, members are considering a number of appropriation bills. Priorities are being weighed, and I hope - given our increasingly technological society - scientific research and science education are high on the list. The development of innovations and new products, particularly in medicine and electronics, depends heavily on scientific research. Besides expanding the sum of human knowledge, federally funded scientific research grows our economy and improves the quality of life for all Americans.
NEWS
August 19, 2014
The headline on the news release out of Maryland's Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation yesterday sounded pretty great: "Private Sector Gains 18,700 Jobs Over-the-Year. " Read the body of the release, though, and you'll discover the actual news was not so great. In July, it says, Maryland actually lost 9,000 jobs, one of the worst performances in the nation and a distinct outlier in a month when 36 states and Washington, D.C., gained jobs. Not that the agency was dwelling on that.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Exelon, the parent of Baltimore Gas & Electric, filed its application Tuesday with the state to acquire Pepco Holdings, a move company officials say will improve service and boost the economies of Pepco's service areas in and around Washington, D.C., and on the Eastern Shore. Chicago-based Exelon reached a $6.9 billion agreement this spring to acquire Pepco, but the deal must be approved by state regulators, including the Public Service Commission of Maryland. Donna Cooper, president of Pepco Region, said she expected the approvals to be completed in the second or third quarter of next year.
NEWS
August 7, 2014
Your Aug. 4 editorial ( "Cap and dividend" ) does not take into consideration the phenomenon of peak oil. I'm in favor of measures that help regular people - and government - make the transition to an energy future that can actually sustain us without poisoning the atmosphere. And I agree with your assertion that rising energy prices will be a "near certainty," but my reason is different. Peak oil refers to a peak in production, which might already be happening, and predicts higher energy prices as production falls.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
The lackluster economy prompted Gov. Martin O'Malley to propose erasing $84 million in planned spending for next year. Just a day after the new state budget took effect, O'Malley persuaded the Board of Public Works unanimously to approve a modest set of cuts to Maryland's $16.1 billion general fund. About $10 million in cuts come from the state's higher-education institutions, although O'Malley aides said it would not affect tuition rates. The cuts would not cause any layoffs but would trim 61 vacant jobs from the state's workforce of about 80,000 people, aides said.
NEWS
June 14, 2012
Lyle Rescott, in his letter to the editor ("Government spending not what economy needs," June 13), poses a couple of legitimate questions. He does indicate his philosophical bias in the last sentence of his letter when he writes Barack Obama "should start being the president of all of us and not just the socialist segment. " Putting that aside, I will address his legitimate questions. He asks, "how many jobs have been lost in the last three years?" The answer to that question is three years ago, there were 108,601,001 jobs in the private sector.
NEWS
November 3, 2010
Now that they have won the House of Representatives back ("Republicans gain House control," Nov. 3), I want to know where the jobs are and why the economy is still in the tank. In this day and age of instant-gratification-isn't-quick-enough, I'm wondering why the pundits are giving the Republics such an easy ride so far. After all, they won back the House, as pundits have been predicting they would since July 2009. Surely they have had enough time to halt a return of the Great Recession, get housing prices back on track, re-employ millions while eliminating taxes for the wealthy, revamping the health insurance system and reforming education and Social Security.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
Whenever Baltimore-area companies sell themselves to out-of-state firms, economists and local leaders alike bemoan the loss. Another headquarters gone. Fewer corporate decision-makers here. Possible job cuts. But Silicon Valley's deals for two Columbia firms - the planned Micros Systems acquisition, announced last week, and Sourcefire last year - strike local entrepreneurs in an entirely different way. They want more California tech giants doing business here, more billion-dollar-plus acquisitions.
NEWS
June 27, 2014
Regarding your recent editorial on the impact of climate change on the economy, I agree that resolving the issue of climate change would not be an economic failure but rather a success ( "The economic climate ," June 24). Aside from the fact that if climate change is ignored the situation of the economy will become an issue of infinitely less importance than the condition of our planet, exploring solutions to the problem will open many opportunities to improve the economy. At current rates of consumption, there is an estimated 50 years of oil left in Earth's crust.
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