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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
Loretta Dumas-Turner, a retired U.S. Department of Labor economist and world traveler, died April 18 from complications of diabetes at Baltimore Washington Medical Center. The longtime Pasadena resident was 57. The daughter of a factory worker and homemaker, the former Loretta Marie Dumas was born and raised in Macon, Ga., where she graduated from public schools. Mrs. Dumas-Turner was a 1977 summa cum laude graduate of Fisk University in Nashville, Tenn., where she earned a bachelor's degree in political science and was a member of Phi Beta Kappa.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Baltimore may lose hundreds of jobs, tens of millions of dollars in economic activity and half of the port's containerized cargo following the state's decision not to build a new rail cargo transfer facility in Morrell Park. State and port officials scrambled Friday to outline alternatives to shoring up Baltimore's place in the international shipping industry ahead of the widening of the Panama Canal and the anticipated growth in Asian container traffic on the East Coast. The rail facility was meant to bring Baltimore's limited freight capacity up to par with other East Coast ports by allowing CSX Transportation to stack truck-sized shipping containers two high on trains for more efficient transportation inland.
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NEWS
February 19, 2006
Selden Alexander Robertson, a retired economist who served as a cryptographer during World War II, died Tuesday at his home in Linthicum. He was 89 and had suffered from Parkinson's disease. Mr. Robertson was born and raised in Petersburg, Va., and graduated from the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. When World War II started, he enlisted in the Army Air Forces. He taught German to soldiers and intercepted and deciphered codes for the Army. He rose to the rank of lieutenant. In a journal that his friend and caretaker Catherine Bacot found at the end of his life, he had written about his time in the Army.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
George W. Hilton, a retired college professor, author and transportation economist whose works on railroads and shipping included the seminal history of Maryland's Ma & Pa Railroad, died Aug. 4 of heart failure at Lorien Health Park in Columbia. He was 89. "George was a great historian for lost causes and great failures like narrow-gauge railroads and the Ma & Pa," said Herbert R. Harwood Jr., a retired CSX executive and a nationally known railroad historian and author. "That resulted in the definitive histories of the American narrow-gauge railroads, the electric interurban railway industry, cable-powered street railways, overnight steamships along the coasts and in the Great Lakes.
BUSINESS
By Jim Johnson and Jim Johnson,McClatchy News Service | January 27, 1991
ATLANTA -- The sudden turnabout in oil prices following the outbreak of war in the Persian Gulf left some economists at the annual National Association of Home Builders convention upbeat about the recovery of the housing industry this year.Oil prices skyrocketed, then fell, leading economist Laurence Meyer of St. Louis to comment: "What we thought would take four to six weeks took only three to four hours."Mr. Meyer said he expects oil prices to fall some more. That scenario, combined with higher government spending because of the war, will result in a stronger-than-anticipated economic recovery, he predicted.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2010
The proposed Washington compromise on tax cuts and extending unemployment benefits will pump billions more in federal dollars into Maryland's and Howard County's economy, a prominent local economist says, but the bill for that short-term gain will eventually come due. "To me, this is quite bad news for Maryland," Anirban Basu of Sage Policy Group told more than 200 local business leaders gathered at an annual Howard County Chamber of Commerce economic...
NEWS
By Edwin Diamond and Edwin Diamond,Special to The Sun | March 12, 1995
"The Pursuit of Reason: The Economist 1843-1993," by Ruth Dudley Edwards. 1,040 pages. Boston: Harvard Business School Press $49.50Is the best political weekly in America an economic journal published in London?A number of us Yanks who work in journalism have long admired the Economist. We've found its American Survey section to be hands-down superior to what we were reading - and producing - in our own stateside magazines.Civilian readers apparently agree. The Economist is 151 years old . . . and counting; its circulation now approaches 600,000 weekly, almost 200,000 of that in the U.S. At a time when American publications are dumbing down in a (ultimately)
NEWS
April 8, 2005
R. Richard Geddes, senior staff economist of President Bush's Council of Economic Advisers, will present "The Application of Property Rights to Current Policy Issues" at 3:30 p.m. today in Room 312, Stephens Hall, at Towson University. Geddes, a Towson University alumnus who also serves as associate professor of policy analysis and management at Cornell University, will discuss Social Security reform, environmental economics and other policy issues. Admission to the talk is free. For more information, call Jim Dorn, professor of economics, 410-704-2956 or e-mail jdorn@ towson.
NEWS
June 9, 2003
Robert Frank Mize, a retired federal economist, died Friday of kidney failure at Virginia Hospital Center in Arlington, Va. The Mount Airy resident was 80. He previously lived in Silver Spring and had worked as an economist and program analyst for the departments of Labor and Defense, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. He retired from the federal government in 1975 after 28 years. He was born and raised in David City, Neb. He was a private in the Army from 1944 to 1946, when he was honorably discharged.
BUSINESS
By David Conn | January 8, 1992
A key economic indicator shows the nation's economy should grow by 2 percent to 3 percent this year, according to a Loyola College economist, but a survey of area business leaders reveals less optimism about the growth of the mid-Atlantic region's economy.The strongest sign that the national economy will grow at a healthy pace this year is the 2.5 percentage-point spread between short- and long-term interest rates, according to Mark Meador, whose report appears in the January 1992 "Executive Business Outlook," a twice-a-year publication of Loyola's business school.
NEWS
By Joseph Swartz | May 14, 2014
As a Field Artillery officer in the 82nd Airborne Division and a veteran of the Afghanistan Campaign, I've been called a lot of things, but never unprincipled. But with the way some of my fellow Republicans talk, I'm Benedict Arnold. Since leaving the Army a little over a year ago, I moved to Maryland to restart my civilian life. My partner and I, finally together after two years of back-to-back deployments, bought a house with a big yard on a quiet cul de sac and settled into our routine.
NEWS
May 3, 2014
Professor Peter Morici argues in his commentary "Democracy, not capitalism, fails the middle class" (May 1) that "extreme positions for and against intervention ... too often block ... prudent regulation. " I would argue that economists, not democracy, are primarily to blame for failing to speak with one voice when offering advice to elected leaders. Even the most ridiculous policy proposals include economists among their advocates. Jim Case, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | April 30, 2014
The new book by French economist Thomas Piketty, "Capital in the Twenty-First Century," has rocketed to the top of the Amazon.com bestseller list. It accomplished this feat by offering yet another apocalyptic vision of capitalism in the tradition of Malthus, Ricardo and Marx. To American workers and a middle class besieged by stagnant wages and rising taxes, it provides justification for the dangerous elixir of confiscatory taxes on the wealthy hustled by liberal pundits and politicians.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
Private employers in Maryland led the way to modest job gains in March, and the state unemployment rate remained essentially unchanged since February, according to preliminary figures released Friday by the U.S. Department of Labor. The agency estimated a net gain of 2,300 jobs, and posted the state's unemployment rate at 5.6 percent, meaning 174,500 people in the state were unemployed last month. The March national unemployment rate was 6.7 percent. Job gains occurred chiefly in the private sector, led by retail, transportation and utilities with 2,200 jobs; followed by professional and business services, including technical fields, scientific research and cybersecurity, with 1,200; and financial services with 600. These were offset by losses in education and health, leisure, manufacturing and construction.
BUSINESS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2014
— An effort to lure the FBI to Maryland could have a profound payoff for the state's economy, but the benefits could take years to materialize and the eventual impact would hinge on the way local officials handle the project, several of the state's top economists say. Maryland's congressional delegation has been pressing for months to make Prince George's County the new home of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, which is currently headquartered in...
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | January 13, 2014
Three MTV series that chronicle the tough and sometimes troubled lives of teen moms contributed to a 5.7 percent reduction in teen births, or one-third the total decline, according to a new study. The study by researchers from the University of Maryland and Wellesley College also found that Internet searches and tweets about birth control and abortion spike when "16 and Pregnant," "Teen Mom" and "Teen Mom 2" air. The reductions occcured between June 2009, when the first show aired, and the end of 2010.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | August 24, 1992
Maybe George Bush is a Republican, maybe he did run his own business, and maybe he does want to treat Wall Street to a cut in the capital gains tax. But among many of the economists who shape the strategies of the nation's banks and investment houses, patience with the president ended with his speech last week.The very highlight of his plan -- offsetting cuts in taxes and spending -- was widely denounced as poison for an economy in a joyless, jobless recovery."Almost every economist would agree that equal cuts in taxes and spending actually depress the economy," said Allen Sinai, chief economist of Boston Co. "It is not a growth program."
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | January 19, 1993
NEW YORK -- Lester C. Thurow's message to the nation' retailers yesterday was akin to telling a group of cattlemen that people should eat less beef and more broccoli.The economist, whose writings are close to the top of President-elect Bill Clinton's reading list, told the National Retail Federation that the U.S. economy needs a shift toward investment and away from consumption -- that is, his audience's sales.In a keynote speech that sounded like an extension of last month's economic summit in Little Rock, Ark., the Massachusetts Institute of Technology scholar described a U.S. economy under siege by rivals that put their money into robots instead of recreational vehicles.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2014
Maryland employers could pick up the pace of job creation to 40,000 positions this year, according to some forecasts, but one local economist expects a slowdown instead. Moody's Analytics and Towson University's Regional Economic Studies Institute expect fairly broad-based job growth in 2014 - they're both predicting about 40,000 positions added in the state, which would be the best performance in years. Full results for 2013 aren't in yet, but Maryland employers added about 34,000 jobs in the 12 months ending in November, according to federal estimates.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Prepare for a year of more in the real estate industry - more improvement, mostly, but also more expense as mortgage rates, prices and rents rise. Analysts expect a solid 2014 here and nationally, after a year in which the battered housing market got on firmer footing. They predict home values will continue rising and expect to see more choices for home buyers as higher prices pull in more would-be sellers. Moody's Analytics is forecasting an 8 percent rise in average home prices in the Baltimore region this year, compared with a 5.6 percent increase last year.
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