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NEWS
February 18, 2012
Marta Mossburg's argument that it is not economics but values that has caused our social dislocation ("A failure of values, not economics," Feb. 15) reflects the either/or thinking that has so polarized our nation in recent years. The fact is that economics and values cannot be separated from one another. Each permeates and reflects the other, so that if an economic system is based on greed, the values it inculcates in the population will be reflected in greedy behavior. Conversely, if a people's values hold sharing and cooperation to be most important, its economy will be less cut-throat, and more egalitarian.
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NEWS
September 24, 2014
Thirty years ago, on its opening day in 1984, Donald Trump stood in a dark topcoat on the casino floor at Atlantic City's Trump Plaza, crowing that his new investment was the finest building in Atlantic City and possibly the nation. Last week, the Trump Plaza folded and the Trump Taj Mahal filed for bankruptcy, leaving some 1,000 employees without jobs. Mr. Trump, meanwhile, was on Twitter claiming he had "nothing to do with Atlantic City," and praising himself for his "great timing" in getting out of the investment.
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NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | April 10, 1991
IDEOLOGICAL conformism on campus has come under wide attack as the last, pathetic gasp of the 1960s. Supposedly, students and teachers, especially in the humanities, are under pressure from leftover radicals to be "politically correct," both socially and in the classroom.This is, of course, deplorable. However, if you want to see truly rigid political correctness, take a good look at the field I cover -- economics.To be credentialed to practice economicsm today, one must accept a certain body of theology -- a particular way of looking at human motivation and human society.
NEWS
Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Looking to protect Marylanders from unsafe levels of smog, environmental regulators are moving to clamp down on pollution from the state's smaller coal-burning power plants, but plant owners warn that the rule could have economic consequences. The Maryland Department of the Environment recently unveiled a draft rule two years in the planning that would require coal-burning plants in the Baltimore and Washington areas to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides by 48 percent over the next four years.
NEWS
By Warren B. Rudman | September 29, 1992
RECENTLY, many politicians and economists have launched a new approach to the exploding U.S. deficit: Don't worry, be happy.Tired of wrestling with how to untie our fiscal Gordian knot, these folks now suggest we simply learn to live with our red ink. They advise us to indulge our urge to spend our children's money, advocating Strangelove Economics ("How I learned to stop worrying and love the deficit").Candidates this year have treated the deficit like the skunk at the garden party. They advocate "investment" (spending)
NEWS
October 20, 1992
What do Ronald Coase, Harry M. Markowitz, William F. Sharpe, Merton Miller, Trygve Haavelmo, Maurice Allais, Robert M. Solow, James M. Buchanan Jr., Franco Modigliani, Richard Stone, Gerard Debreu and George J. Stigler have in common with Gary S. Becker?They won the Nobel Prize for Economics in the decade before he just did. They also share with him a certain lack of notoriety, although Mr. Becker is known to readers of Business Week magazine, for which he writes a column.This contrasts with the first decade in which the prize was given, starting in 1969, when such winners as Paul A. Samuelson, Wassily Leontief, Gunnar Myrdal, Friedrich August Von Hayek, Milton Friedman and Herbert A. Simon really were widely known.
NEWS
July 31, 2004
Leona S. Trotter, a retired economics professor, died Tuesday of congestive heart failure at Keswick Multi-Care Center. The Mount Washington resident was 95. Born Leona Sechi in Paris, she grew up in Italy and moved to the United States in 1919. She earned a degree from New York University and received a master's degree from Columbia University, where she studied romance languages and economics. She then taught at what is now Connecticut College in New London. While there, she co-authored a textbook on Italian language and literature.
TRAVEL
By Los Angeles Times | July 15, 2007
It seems as though every ticket I buy -- except plane tickets -- can be transferred to someone else. I understand the airline's need to know who is on a plane, but they must have the ability to change the passenger name on a reservation. Why are plane tickets nontransferable? Ask a simple question; get an answer that's so complicated it takes a professor of economics to explain it. On its face, this seemed like a pretty easy question. Surely, this just had to be a government regulation.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | May 24, 2006
William Michael Bailey, a longtime heart transplant survivor whose career teaching economics at Washington College spanned more than three decades, died of cancer Saturday at Chester River Hospital Center. The Chestertown resident was 68. Born in Hobbs, N.M., and raised in Fort Worth, Texas, he earned a bachelor's degree in economics in 1959 from North Texas State University in Denton. He earned a master's in economics from the University of Maryland, College Park and earned his doctorate there in 1973.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | September 21, 2006
Katherine Henneberger, a retired Goucher College economics professor who believed that the study of financial trends did not have to be dull, died of cancer Friday at her Owings Mills home. She was 61. Born in Baltimore and raised on her parents' farm, Milford Meadows, she was a 1963 graduate of Milford Mill High School and earned a bachelor's degree in English at Goucher College. As a young woman, she rode horses and was a model and an orientation and training director for the Hecht Co., where she also edited the retailer's in-house employee publication.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 4, 2014
I have a question for my Republican friends. Yes, that sounds like the setup for a smackdown, but though the question is pointed, it is also in earnest. I'd seriously like to know: If Republican fiscal policies really are the key to prosperity, if the GOP formula of low taxes and little regulation really does unleash economic growth, then why has the country fared better under Democratic presidents than Republican ones, and why are red states the poorest states in the country?
NEWS
Stephanie Rawlings-Blake | August 28, 2014
Baltimore City elicits genuine pride from its residents. Every neighborhood is unique, and generations of families have stayed here because they were not willing to give up on this great city. After decades of population decline, Baltimore is finally growing again. We did not get here by accident, nor did we get here by thinking small. I am determined to grow Baltimore by continuing to build projects that will sustain Baltimore well into the future. Thousands of local jobs are being created through projects like the recently opened Horseshoe Baltimore Casino.
NEWS
August 8, 2014
Whatever the reason for Brenda McKenzie's decision to leave as head of the Baltimore Development Corporation after just two years, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake made a shrewd move by recruiting City Councilman William H. Cole IV to take her place. Ms. McKenzie never fully gelled with the downtown business community that has traditionally been the BDC's chief constituency, but Mr. Cole, who has represented the central business district for two terms on the council, has immediate credibility in that area.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. had a $3.8 billion economic impact on the Baltimore region last year, according to a study conducted for the utility. The report, prepared by the Economic Alliance of Greater Baltimore Foundation, said BGE supported nearly 8,700 jobs last year. That includes 3,035 people directly employed by the company, jobs at contractors and the ripple effect of both groups spending their paychecks. The Economic Alliance said BGE's economic impact was on par with the effect of some entire industries, such as computer systems and design services.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
John W. Dorsey, former chancellor of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County who later returned to the classroom where he taught economics, died Monday of respiratory failure at his Laurel home. He was 78. "Many believe that he saved UMBC from several alternative fates, from absorption to closure, and set it onto the sound course that leads to today," said Joseph N. Tatarewicz, an associate professor of history at UMBC and director of the university's human context of science and technology program.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
A Major League Baseball panel's recent decision would rewrite the economics of the relationship between the Orioles and Washington Nationals, diverting tens of millions of dollars in annual profits from the regional television network that primarily benefit the Baltimore team, according to baseball sources. The private decision, made by three club owners selected by Commissioner Bud Selig, would diminish the amount of money the Orioles receive under a 2005 agreement establishing how money from Mid-Atlantic Sports Network is to be divided by the neighboring teams.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 11, 1993
BONN, Germany -- Economics Minister Guenter Rexrodt delivered a gloomy assessment of Germany's short-term economic prospects yesterday, predicting zero growth this year as the country struggles to overcome the effects of a global slowdown and the task of rebuilding the former communist east."
NEWS
By BRIAN SULLAM | November 28, 1993
Organized labor was not the only loser in the debate over the North American Free Trade Agreement. Economics principles got quite a beating as well.The public debate over NAFTA affirms the numerous studies that show that most Americans have a very poor understanding of economics and economic principles.But what was more surprising was that some of the main opponents and proponents of the treaty -- who should have known better -- relied more on economic fiction than fact to make their points.
NEWS
July 29, 2014
Chicago's 2008 privatization of its municipal parking assets is widely considered to be a colossal boondoggle. Los Angeles considered selling off a few of its parking garages earlier this decade but scrapped the idea after it became clear that the deal wouldn't be nearly as good as initially advertised. Pittsburgh's city council killed a parking privatization deal in 2010 amid concerns about hidden costs in the proposed contract. In 2013, Cincinnati signed a deal to privatize its parking, but then voters rebelled, electing an anti-privatization mayor and city council, who promptly killed the plan.
NEWS
July 14, 2014
Last month, Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz wrote a letter to Maryland Transportation Secretary James T. Smith Jr. indicating his displeasure with certain aspects of the proposed Red Line light rail project. He doesn't want the county to contribute nearly as much as the state has proposed, and he wants the county's portion of the 14-mile line to be built in an "early phase" of construction. But that doesn't really capture the sheer audacity of the letter. That Mr. Kamenetz would make such demands on such a major transportation project is truly the tail wagging the dog. What he is barking at is a mere $50 million contribution - compared to financially-strapped Baltimore's expected $200 million share.
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