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By Jack Germond & Jules Witcover | September 14, 1992
DETROIT -- President Bush, in emphasizing private ove public investment in the latest packaging of his economic recovery proposals before the Economic Club of Detroit, was clearly preaching to the choir. Still, the high-powered Michigan businessmen, including major auto manufacturing tycoons, responded rather mildly to the sermon. They had heard it several times before, though in dribs and drabs over the last year.That, in fact, was the problem, as a senior administration official (name withheld under White House rules)
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NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2003
Baltimore and 360 other ports across the country are being ordered by the Department of Homeland Security to undertake more than $7 billion in security improvements - possibly the largest and costliest maritime initiative in history. Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge outlined the new rules - calling for everything from low-tech fencing to sophisticated identification systems - in a speech at the port of Wilmington in Delaware yesterday. "With 95 percent of our nation's overseas cargo carried by ship, maritime security is critical to ensuring our nation's homeland and economic security," Ridge said in prepared remarks.
NEWS
By Andrew L. Yarrow | November 3, 2009
"The awkward age" was a term long ago applied to early adolescence. Today, for demographic and economic reasons, a new awkward age has emerged in the United States: people from their late 50s to late 60s. They are not "old," as a 65-year-old would have been considered 50 years ago, but they're just beyond midlife. Conventionally, this age group has been seen as on the cusp of retirement or retired, doting on their grandchildren. Today, the picture no longer fits many of the tens of millions of Americans at this stage of life, who - in our youth-obsessed culture - generally don't think of themselves as old. Americans live 15 years longer than two generations ago. Many at this stage of life need or want to work longer.
NEWS
By GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE | January 16, 1994
Tammie Pettie, a young woman with a promising future as a bookkeeper, is an argument for worker retraining programs. Gary Horstmann, a middle-aged man who finds himself washing dishes part time, makes you wonder if they are worthwhile.Together, they define a debate that will engage the nation over the coming weeks as President Clinton unveils a $3-billion worker security program and tries to push the legislation through a skeptical Congress this year.With millions of workers facing permanent job losses rather than temporary layoffs, Mr. Clinton will seek to double spending on retraining them for new careers, switching the emphasis from unemployment benefits to re-employment opportunities.
NEWS
By Don Lee and Jim Puzzanghera and Don Lee and Jim Puzzanghera,Tribune Newspapers | January 25, 2010
WASHINGTON - - With congressional support eroding, his popularity falling and his renomination of Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke potentially in trouble, President Barack Obama faces an even more daunting task in saving his entire domestic agenda and convincing millions of angry Americans that his economic policies will bring them a brighter future. Even as the economy has begun clawing its way out of the Great Recession and job losses have slowed dramatically, critics on the left and the right - even party loyalists - say the president has failed to articulate a clear economic vision.
NEWS
By Christine Adams | September 17, 2012
Sensing, perhaps, that they are losing the public relations battle after Senate candidate Todd Akin's forehead-slapping views on "legitimate rape" and the female body's magical ability to guard against pregnancy, Republicans are trying now to focus on the "real" issues of the economy and jobs, which play to businessman Mitt Romney's strengths, rather than the "side issue" of reproductive rights. Birth control and abortion were non-topics at the recent Republican convention. The GOP argument, in the words of Florida attorney general Pat Bondi, is that women don't care about a party's stance on women's reproductive health: "What women care about are jobs, the economy, the unemployment rate.
NEWS
April 23, 1996
GROUP OF SEVEN summits, for leaders of the free world, were institutionalized for economic purpose. But when these seven leaders got to Moscow last weekend, their purpose was purely political, knowing that development rests on security.The main accomplishment was to call for a treaty banning nuclear explosions. Now that France has finished with testing, the only nuclear power holdout is China. This was pressure on China to come along, done in the capital of China's biggest rival, in a forum in which China is excluded.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2001
The idea of packing up and herding their three young children on a plane for a big vacation was so daunting to Tony and Terrie Weis that the Phoenix couple has always limited family trips to drives to the Eastern Shore. But this month, they're flying away for a week at Disney World, tempted by travel deals that are luring even unlikely tourists far from home. Initially, Terrie Weis said, she was unwilling to travel anywhere in the wake of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Discounts totaling about $1,500 helped her come around.
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By Janene Holzberg | March 28, 2012
Growing up in a Baltimore row house, Elaine Northrop had a happy, if somewhat unconventional, childhood. Her father was a dreamer and a gambler, recalls Northrop, who grew up to build one of the most successful real estate companies in Howard County from the ground up. Her mother was the family's breadwinner and dealt with their money woes, but her father was an eternal optimist who taught her to believe in herself. At age 23, such life lessons would be called into play when she agreed to marry her first husband on their second date.
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