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NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | November 6, 2006
ATLANTA -- In the final hours before the midterm elections, the misbegotten war in Iraq is still dominating headlines and airwaves. As well it should. Since the terrorist attacks of 9/11, Republicans have insisted on making their so-called war on terror the centerpiece of every election campaign. It serves them right to be chained to the stern of that sinking ship now. The next Congress must deal with Iraq but also must begin to look beyond it. The economy - and the growing gap between the haves and have-nots - needs just as much attention as the war. Indeed, farsighted economists have argued that the decline of the nation's manufacturing base poses a greater threat to America than Islamic jihadists.
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NEWS
January 30, 2014
Representative C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger's decision not to run for governor might not have been much of a surprise for Maryland's politicians, but his older constituents, who comprise about 12 percent of his district's voters, may well have been surprised to hear that he wants to remain in Washington to continue working on tax and entitlement reform ( "Ruppersberger decides against a run for governor," Jan. 22). On Capitol Hill, "entitlement reform" is the "kinder, gentler" phrase that members of both political parties now use to describe plans to cut benefits for middle-class Americans.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 9, 1992
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- President-elect Bill Clinton probably will postpone the appointment of top Cabinet officers until early December, focusing instead on a plan to overhaul the government's uppermost echelon to give economic affairs unprecedented status, according to his advisers.The plan, which officials of his transition team described yesterday as Mr. Clinton's priority, would create a new Economic Security Council in the White House whose power and authority would parallel that of the existing National Security Council.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
Five air traffic control towers in Maryland that are part of 149 "low activity" towers nationwide will remain open through the end of the September, the U.S. Department of Transportation announced Friday. The towers, including those at Martin State Airport in Baltimore County and Easton/Newnam Field on the Eastern Shore had been slated to close in June under federal budget cuts known as sequestration. Legislation approved by Congress last month gave the Federal Aviation Administration authority to transfer money from other accounts to keep the towers open.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2002
Trumpeting her experience and the Republican leadership's promise to give her a seat on the House Appropriations Committee, former U.S. Rep. Helen Delich Bentley officially announced her candidacy for Congress yesterday on a windy pier at the port of Baltimore. In her announcement before about 175 supporters, she laid out the theme of her campaign: homeland and economic security. With the backdrop of Fort McHenry and the giant cranes of the port, an institution that has been the center of her professional and public life, Bentley said that if elected, she'll work to protect domestic shipping and manufacturing to maintain the nation's strength and independence.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 27, 1998
PHOENIX -- A five-month Department of Economic Security investigation concluded yesterday that "abuse and neglect" led to the death of a 16-year-old California youth at the Arizona Boys Ranch and prompted officials to deny an operating license to the paramilitary-style boot camp for juvenile offenders.The state report also revealed that 17 former staff members will be placed on the Arizona Child Abuser Directory as a result of their treatment of Nicholaus Contreraz of Sacramento.The directory is a confidential computerized list meant to help the department screen people for foster care and other children's services.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
Five air traffic control towers in Maryland that are part of 149 "low activity" towers nationwide will remain open through the end of the September, the U.S. Department of Transportation announced Friday. The towers, including those at Martin State Airport in Baltimore County and Easton/Newnam Field on the Eastern Shore had been slated to close in June under federal budget cuts known as sequestration. Legislation approved by Congress last month gave the Federal Aviation Administration authority to transfer money from other accounts to keep the towers open.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | October 18, 1993
PRESIDENT Clinton has at last offered a basic theme to define his administration, and it is a good one -- security. In a major address last Tuesday in Chapel Hill, N.C., the president astutely linked "economic security, health care security, personal security."Connecting this theme to his oft-repeated campaign mantra -- "We must change" -- he told his audience: "People resist change when they are most insecure." Distinguishing his conception of security from a culture of dependency, Mr. Clinton declared, "The security we seek is like a rope for a rock-climber, lifting those who will take responsibility for their own lives to even greater pinnacles.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 13, 1993
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. -- Trying to put the world's hot spots of Haiti and Somalia behind him, President Clinton traveled outside Washington yesterday to promote his ambitious domestic agenda of anti-crime measures, a free-trade agreement and health care reform.Mr. Clinton said he is trying to offer security in tumultuous times -- "health security, economic security and personal security.""The security I seek for America is like a rope for a rock climber, to lift those who will take responsibility for their own lives to greater and greater pinnacles," Mr. Clinton said at the bicentennial convocation at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
NEWS
February 8, 2008
When President Bush offered his record $3.1 trillion budget this week, he said national security was his top priority, and he proved it with substantial increases for the military. But that same budget undermines the economic security of millions of Americans, including many in Maryland. The president didn't mention that. While funding a war in Iraq that is costing $10 billion a month, Mr. Bush is proposing to cut or freeze a wide array of programs that are helping low-income families in Maryland and across the nation care for their children, live in decent housing, pay to heat their homes and meet other everyday challenges.
NEWS
By Christine Adams | September 17, 2012
Sensing, perhaps, that they are losing the public relations battle after Senate candidate Todd Akin's forehead-slapping views on "legitimate rape" and the female body's magical ability to guard against pregnancy, Republicans are trying now to focus on the "real" issues of the economy and jobs, which play to businessman Mitt Romney's strengths, rather than the "side issue" of reproductive rights. Birth control and abortion were non-topics at the recent Republican convention. The GOP argument, in the words of Florida attorney general Pat Bondi, is that women don't care about a party's stance on women's reproductive health: "What women care about are jobs, the economy, the unemployment rate.
NEWS
By Don Lee and Jim Puzzanghera and Don Lee and Jim Puzzanghera,Tribune Newspapers | January 25, 2010
WASHINGTON - - With congressional support eroding, his popularity falling and his renomination of Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke potentially in trouble, President Barack Obama faces an even more daunting task in saving his entire domestic agenda and convincing millions of angry Americans that his economic policies will bring them a brighter future. Even as the economy has begun clawing its way out of the Great Recession and job losses have slowed dramatically, critics on the left and the right - even party loyalists - say the president has failed to articulate a clear economic vision.
NEWS
By Andrew L. Yarrow | November 3, 2009
"The awkward age" was a term long ago applied to early adolescence. Today, for demographic and economic reasons, a new awkward age has emerged in the United States: people from their late 50s to late 60s. They are not "old," as a 65-year-old would have been considered 50 years ago, but they're just beyond midlife. Conventionally, this age group has been seen as on the cusp of retirement or retired, doting on their grandchildren. Today, the picture no longer fits many of the tens of millions of Americans at this stage of life, who - in our youth-obsessed culture - generally don't think of themselves as old. Americans live 15 years longer than two generations ago. Many at this stage of life need or want to work longer.
NEWS
February 8, 2008
When President Bush offered his record $3.1 trillion budget this week, he said national security was his top priority, and he proved it with substantial increases for the military. But that same budget undermines the economic security of millions of Americans, including many in Maryland. The president didn't mention that. While funding a war in Iraq that is costing $10 billion a month, Mr. Bush is proposing to cut or freeze a wide array of programs that are helping low-income families in Maryland and across the nation care for their children, live in decent housing, pay to heat their homes and meet other everyday challenges.
NEWS
December 31, 2007
Even in wealthy Md., poverty takes its toll Mary Ellen Vanni's thoughtful essay should be mandatory reading for every policymaker in Maryland ("High energy costs take a big toll on state's poor," Opinion Commentary, Dec. 26). Her stark descriptions of poverty's immediate effects - of people too poor to afford adequate heat - and of the longer-term consequences of poverty - such as kids at higher risk of serious health, injury and nutritional problems - call out for action by the state's leadership.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | November 6, 2006
ATLANTA -- In the final hours before the midterm elections, the misbegotten war in Iraq is still dominating headlines and airwaves. As well it should. Since the terrorist attacks of 9/11, Republicans have insisted on making their so-called war on terror the centerpiece of every election campaign. It serves them right to be chained to the stern of that sinking ship now. The next Congress must deal with Iraq but also must begin to look beyond it. The economy - and the growing gap between the haves and have-nots - needs just as much attention as the war. Indeed, farsighted economists have argued that the decline of the nation's manufacturing base poses a greater threat to America than Islamic jihadists.
NEWS
By KALMAN R. HETTLEMAN | May 19, 1992
The epitaph for the Rodney King episode is likely to be the old adage: ''After all is said and done, much is said and little is done.''That doesn't have to be. We can overcome our national paralysis and dramatically reduce urban underclass poverty. But it won't be easy, cheap or fast. It must be vastly different from what we've tried in the past and what are now hearing.Last week's hurry-up bipartisan accord on enterprise zones, tenant ownership of public housing and a trickle of extra dollars is an election-year cover-up for policy bankruptcy and political fright.
NEWS
By Gwen Ifill and Gwen Ifill,New York Times News Service | December 5, 1992
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- Sen. Lloyd Bentsen, D-Texas, ha emerged as President-elect Bill Clinton's top choice for secretary of the Treasury, Clinton campaign officials said last night.Mr. Bentsen, 71, has been informed that he is Mr. Clinton's first choice for the sensitive economics post, but officials of the transition team have not yet completed the required background examination of his financial records.If Mr. Bentsen is the final selection, the formal announcement of his nomination would likely come next week as Mr. Clinton names the members of his economics team.
NEWS
September 8, 2006
Time was when a presidential visit was a big deal. A bit less so in Maryland than in other states because the White House is so close chief executives make the trip frequently. Still, local dignitaries could be expected to muster. Especially those from the president's own party. Not this year. When George W. Bush blew into Southern Maryland last week for a Labor Day event, the state's top Republican leaders and candidates were elsewhere. Snubs are rarely so evident, but Mr. Bush isn't flooded with requests from candidates in tight election contests anywhere to come help rally the troops.
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