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By TOM PETERS | January 25, 1993
The Economist, in a Nov. 28 report, calls it "the world's biggest economic boom." Shops are "clogged," and factories, offices and homes "are being built as fast as round-the-clock construction crews can put them up."The subject: China. By 2012, if current growth trends continue, it could be the world's largest economy. That means, the magazine asserts, "the biggest change since the Industrial Revolution."The binge started in 1978, when Deng Xiaoping embraced sweeping economic reform. Since then, China's growth has averaged 9 percent a year (12 percent in 1992)
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NEWS
By David Holley and Maggie Farley and David Holley and Maggie Farley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 10, 2004
MOSCOW - President Vladimir V. Putin named his United Nations envoy as Russia's new foreign minister yesterday in a pre-election Cabinet reorganization that slashed the number of ministries but kept key market-oriented reformers in their posts. U.N. Ambassador Sergei V. Lavrov replaced Igor S. Ivanov, who was named head of Russia's Security Council, seen as a less influential position. The reshuffle signals that economic reforms will probably accelerate, while foreign policy will still be run by Putin and implemented by a seasoned professional diplomat, analysts said.
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NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | August 13, 1992
JERUSALEM -- With relief but no euphoria over Washington's offer of $10 billion in loan guarantees to help absorb immigrants, Israel warily began looking forward to years of belt-tightening economic reform.It was widely noted that the guarantees are carefully pegged to Israeli policy on settlements in the occupied territories, which Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin has ordered frozen -- except for some to be completed for "security" reasons.That argument is certain to be central to the Middle East talks scheduled to resume Aug. 24 in Washington.
TOPIC
By THE ECONOMIST | July 7, 2002
SOMETHING had to give. For months, Argentina's president, Eduardo Duhalde, has struggled to restore something approaching order to the country's shattered economy. His efforts have largely been in vain. Six months after the disastrous collapse of the peso and the financial system, virtually no progress has been made. The economy is in its fourth year of recession, unemployment is about 24 percent, and riots have returned to the streets of Buenos Aires. Duhalde, an interim president whose poll ratings have fallen to 8 percent, had nowhere to turn.
TOPIC
By THE ECONOMIST | July 7, 2002
SOMETHING had to give. For months, Argentina's president, Eduardo Duhalde, has struggled to restore something approaching order to the country's shattered economy. His efforts have largely been in vain. Six months after the disastrous collapse of the peso and the financial system, virtually no progress has been made. The economy is in its fourth year of recession, unemployment is about 24 percent, and riots have returned to the streets of Buenos Aires. Duhalde, an interim president whose poll ratings have fallen to 8 percent, had nowhere to turn.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 24, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush, saying he is convinced that Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev remains committed to economic reform, hinted strongly yesterday that he is now inclined to favor some form of Western economic aid to the Soviet Union.If the Soviets come forward with an economic plan that "makes sense, we'll encourage it," Mr. Bush told reporters. "If we have some reservations about it, we owe Mr. Gorbachev, who is a friend, that 'Hey look, this has some difficulty.' "Later, he said, "Gorbachev, I am still convinced, is working the reform path, working the perestroika path, and I'm not going to pull the rug out from under him. On the other hand, we have limitations on what we can do. And when we do something, we want it to be meaningful."
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 13, 1990
WASHINGTON -- President Bush granted credit guarantees worth up to $1 billion yesterday to allow a hungry Soviet Union to buy American food and scheduled a Feb. 11-13 superpower summit in Moscow for signing a treaty cutting long-range nuclear arms.Minutes later, a grateful Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze made a further appeal for Western support for his rocky government, warning that historic agreements stabilizing European security could be in jeopardy if the Soviet Union broke apart.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 21, 1992
MOSCOW -- President Boris N. Yeltsin, who rushed home from China to shore up his control over the formation of a new government, agreed with his new prime minister yesterday that the "core" of the last Cabinet of Westernized, free-market economists would remain in office, a spokesman for Mr. Yeltsin said.After several hours of talks yesterday involving Mr. Yeltsin, Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin and Vladimir Shumeiko, the first deputy prime minister, Mr. Yeltsin's spokesman announced, "The basic current team will be preserved."
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | April 5, 1992
MOSCOW -- Boris N. Yeltsin will face the most difficult test of his leadership since the days of the August putsch when a session of Russia's most powerful legislative body opens here tomorrow.Having yanked Russia onto a course of painful and abrupt economic reform through a series of unilateral presidential decrees, Mr. Yeltsin has stirred up his resentful opponents within the parliament to a near-fever pitch.Now, they see their chance to strike back through the latest session of the Congress of People's Deputies, a broad-based, constitution-making body that meets only every six months or so.The Congress will be asked to approve a new constitution and to debate Mr. Yeltsin's economic reform program.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | April 5, 1992
MOSCOW -- Boris N. Yeltsin will face the most difficult test of his leadership since the days of the August putsch when a session of Russia's most powerful legislative body opens here tomorrow.Having yanked Russia onto a course of painful and abrupt economic reform through a series of unilateral presidential decrees, Mr. Yeltsin has stirred up his resentful opponents within the parliament to a near-fever pitch.Now, they see their chance to strike back through the latest session of the Congress of People's Deputies, a broad-based, constitution-making body that only meets every six months or so.The Congress will be asked to approve a new constitution and to debate Mr. Yeltsin's economic reform program.
NEWS
By Sidney Weintrub | October 25, 1998
This month, Brazilian voters re-elected President Fernando Henrique Cardoso despite the certain knowledge that he was determined to make their economic lives tougher. The hemisphere's economic future might be riding on Brazil's short-term misery.Before the voting, public opinion polls revealed the stunning paradox: As expectations about the Brazilian currency's exchange rate worsened, support for Cardoso increased.Voters' deeper fear was of his main opponent, a labor leader universally known as Lula.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 16, 1998
MOSCOW -- An outspoken economic reformer reportedly has left the Russian government, removing one of the last strong voices for free-market reform in the team being put together by Prime Minister Yevgeny Primakov.The future of the official, Boris Fyodorov, a former finance minister who returned to the government in the spring to spearhead an aggressive tax collection drive, has been closely watched here and abroad as a sign of whether the Primakov government will represent a range of economic viewpoints or will tilt heavily toward policies favored by the Communists.
NEWS
July 29, 1998
POLITICAL stability was achieved but the economic crisis ignored when Japan's Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) chose Foreign Minister Keizo Obuchi as its chief. He will be elected prime minister by the lower house of parliament tomorrow.Mr. Obuchi, who has been foreign minister for a year but has no major economic experience, won because he is the boss of the biggest faction of the party.That's how things have always been done by the LDP, which has learned nothing during the current crisis.
NEWS
April 11, 1998
THE THIRD TIME that President Suharto promised the International Monetary Fund to make economic reforms, he may have meant it.Twice before, Indonesia's elderly dictator agreed to close insolvent banks and end cartels and monopolies enjoyed by his family, if the IMF and rich countries would lend money to cover $74 billion in private-sector international debts.Twice he reneged, made his government more crony-infested and pushed his daughter Siti Hardijanti Rukmana (better known as Tutut) forward as heir apparent.
NEWS
March 2, 1998
THE INAUGURATION of Kim Dae Jung as president of South Korea is the most exciting democratic transition since Nelson Mandela was sworn in as president of South Africa in 1994. The two have much in common, not least the almost impossibly high expectations greeting them.Each was a lifelong crusader against tyranny who spent time in prison. Mr. Kim still limps from a botched government-ordered assassination attempt. Each came to power from the opposition in a democratic election, long past retirement age. Mr. Kim is 74, a year younger than Mr. Mandela was in 1994.
NEWS
March 1, 1998
THE MEETING of the People's Consultative Assembly of Indonesia, starting today, is the last chance President Suharto has to commit his nation to reforms to end its economic crisis, meet International Monetary Fund requirements, diminish his family's stranglehold on the national wealth and promise the people a better future. There is scant hope that he will.When the assembly winds up March 11, "electing" the military dictator to a sixth term as president and presumably his anti-reform crony, B. Jusuf Habibie, as vice president, it may be too late.
BUSINESS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | April 24, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Western financial leaders warned Russia yesterday that any retreat from radical economic reform could throw possible financial aid into jeopardy.At the same time, Germany and Japan were urged to adopt growth packages to help underpin a world economic recovery and help the West ease the former Soviet republics and Eastern Europe into the capitalist world.The two initiatives set the major agendas for a series of international financial meetings here this weekend.They also preceded the arrival here of Yegor Gaidar, the Russian deputy prime minister and economic "czar," who will address both the policy-making interim committee of the International Monetary Fund and the finance ministers of the Group of Seven, the seven most powerful industrial democracies in the world.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 13, 1990
MOSCOW -- Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev said last night that a final plan for the transition to a market economy has at last been completed and that "the whole country" now must determine its fate."
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 28, 1997
BEIJING -- One of the biggest guessing games here ended yesterday when the Chinese Communist Party announced that it would open its most important meeting in years Sept. 12.In most countries, such information would have been a matter of public record months, if not years, ahead of the event. But until yesterday, the timing of China's 15th Party Congress was something of a state secret.The congress -- which is part convention, part national election -- is the first since the death of paramount leader Deng Xiaoping.
NEWS
By Susan Milligan and Susan Milligan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 5, 1997
SOFIA, Bulgaria -- In the hospitals, doctors have stopped performing all but emergency surgery because they don't have anesthesia or the money to buy it." 'Urgency' becomes a very relative term," says Dr. Slavyan Nikolov, a surgeon whose salary at First City Hospital is $10 a month. "There is no medicine. People without money have no options."The same diagnosis applies to all of Bulgaria, where a critical economic situation and political unrest have almost paralyzed the country. There is hyper-inflation, which means that Bulgarians without hard currency can barely afford to eat. The banking system has collapsed.
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