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By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | March 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Here inside the Beltway, the politicians and pundits are wringing their hands and wailing about all the things that are wrong with President Clinton's economic program. But a new opinion poll suggests it is going gangbusters with the electorate.And that finding, in turn, suggests that the voters' complaint last year that the establishment in Washington is out of touch with the country is still valid today.The survey conducted for the Washington Post and ABC News found 59 percent of voters approve of the Clinton plan compared with 31 percent who disapprove and a similar 2-to-1 majority who believe the plan will help rather than hurt the economy.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2012
Lime Kiln eighth-grader Clare Napoli set out to be a big spender, envisioning herself with an expensive house and a sporty Ford Mustang. Then the Junior Achievement online economics education program, called JA Finance Park, gave her a virtual identity, and Napoli discovered that she was a parent of two children. "It told me that I should plan better because I have to pay for their education," said Clare, who with other Howard County eighth-graders is using JA Finance Park as part of their consumer science curriculum.
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NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | April 5, 1992
MOSCOW -- Boris N. Yeltsin will face the most difficult test of his leadership since the days of the August putsch when a session of Russia's most powerful legislative body opens here tomorrow.Having yanked Russia onto a course of painful and abrupt economic reform through a series of unilateral presidential decrees, Mr. Yeltsin has stirred up his resentful opponents within the parliament to a near-fever pitch.Now, they see their chance to strike back through the latest session of the Congress of People's Deputies, a broad-based, constitution-making body that meets only every six months or so.The Congress will be asked to approve a new constitution and to debate Mr. Yeltsin's economic reform program.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and Bill Atkinson and William Patalon III and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2002
After notching some major victories in the corporate-recruiting race in recent years, Maryland's top economic development agency is now increasing its attention on keeping companies here. The Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development has identified 150 companies that are considered key to the state's health. The companies differ by location, size and industry, but all have one thing in common: Over the next several months, each one will get a personal visit from a representative of the state agency.
NEWS
November 27, 1992
That sensational 3.9 percent jump in gross domestic product for the July-to-September quarter gives President-elect Clinton just the leverage he needs to keep big-spending, damn-the-deficit Democrats in check.His first reaction was encouraging. By asserting this good news would allow him to rethink his short-term economic strategy while sticking to long-term plans, he seemed to be signaling caution on the size of an immediate stimulus package and greater focus on the more fundamental problem of keeping national indebtedness under control.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | May 10, 1993
IS America all but ungovernable? Or is Bill Clinton bunglin his attempt to govern it? Or are we judging him too harshly too soon?Yes, yes and yes.The Constitution, let's recall, created political deadlock by design. Our political institutions, with their separation of powers and protection of minority views, make presidential activism difficult and hence rare.In living memory, only two presidents have effectively harnessed government for activist economic purposes -- Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson.
FEATURES
By MICHALE FLETHER | January 17, 1993
Benjamin Hooks' resonant voice is tinged with concern, pride and frustration. He is reflecting on his 16-year reign over the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and on the challenges looming in the group's future.Since succeeding the redoubtable Roy Wilkins as executive director, Mr. Hooks has battled fiercely, perhaps sometimes futilely, to keep civil rights at the top of the American agenda. Now, even as 67-year-old Mr. Hooks prepares to retire, he finds he must still fight -- this time to define his legacy.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | September 26, 1992
WASHINGTON -- As he edges closer to re-entering the presidential campaign, Ross Perot says the attention paid to the federal deficit will determine whether he gets back into the race.He contends that the economic plans of President Bush and Gov. Bill Clinton will not reduce the deficit, projected at $333.5 billion this year, and that only his economic program can do the job. He also suggests that the deficit is the country's major economic problem these days. Is he right?The answers, according to many economists: Yes, his program would reduce the deficit; no, the deficit is not the major economic problem for today, but it will be for tomorrow.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2012
Lime Kiln eighth-grader Clare Napoli set out to be a big spender, envisioning herself with an expensive house and a sporty Ford Mustang. Then the Junior Achievement online economics education program, called JA Finance Park, gave her a virtual identity, and Napoli discovered that she was a parent of two children. "It told me that I should plan better because I have to pay for their education," said Clare, who with other Howard County eighth-graders is using JA Finance Park as part of their consumer science curriculum.
NEWS
By TRB | July 23, 1992
Washington -- We're all having an excellent time snickering at Ross Perot: Mr. Tough Guy who ducked a fight, Mr. Take Charge who took a powder. But the joke may be on us.Mr. Perot became convinced, apparently, that the economic plan he was about to reveal would never sell. He is probably right about that. It was a serious, honest proposal to deal with the federal budget deficit. His handlers were quite right to tell him that seriousness and honesty on that particular subject are a lethal combination.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1996
While many young people will spend their summers hanging out at the local pool or flipping burgers at a fast-food restaurant, five groups of motivated Baltimore youths will start businesses.The youths were among 98 who completed a 10-week Youth Entrepreneur Academy where they learned the ins and outs of the business world. They formed teams, and each team wrote a plan for starting a small business.At the academy's graduation ceremony yesterday at Baltimore City Community College, four of those plans were selected to receive up to $2,500 in start-up money.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Staff Writer | May 23, 1993
STRATHAM, N.H. -- Returning to the place where he had proclaimed himself "the comeback kid," President Clinton defended his economic program yesterday and tried to shore up its eroding support on Capitol Hill by appealing directly to everyday Americans."
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | May 10, 1993
IS America all but ungovernable? Or is Bill Clinton bunglin his attempt to govern it? Or are we judging him too harshly too soon?Yes, yes and yes.The Constitution, let's recall, created political deadlock by design. Our political institutions, with their separation of powers and protection of minority views, make presidential activism difficult and hence rare.In living memory, only two presidents have effectively harnessed government for activist economic purposes -- Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | March 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Here inside the Beltway, the politicians and pundits are wringing their hands and wailing about all the things that are wrong with President Clinton's economic program. But a new opinion poll suggests it is going gangbusters with the electorate.And that finding, in turn, suggests that the voters' complaint last year that the establishment in Washington is out of touch with the country is still valid today.The survey conducted for the Washington Post and ABC News found 59 percent of voters approve of the Clinton plan compared with 31 percent who disapprove and a similar 2-to-1 majority who believe the plan will help rather than hurt the economy.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | February 19, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Buoyed by overnight polls showing overwhelming support for President Clinton's economic plan, congressional Democrats began yesterday what is likely to be a marathon struggle to put aside their individual complaints to get something passed.Mr. Clinton apparently served his own cause well with an address Wednesday night that at least yesterday turned the tide of phone calls and polls in his favor.But as more details become known of the president's ambitious plan to increase taxes and cut spending, lawmakers expect that Mr. Clinton's sales job will get a whole lot tougher.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | February 19, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The people of Maryland spoke yesterday -- but not all of them got through.Congressional offices in Washington and throughout Maryland reported a surge of calls as citizens voted with their phones and gave President Clinton's economic proposals at least a mild thumbs up.Many of the callers who did get through said they were willing to suffer through tax increases if it would help cut the deficit.That marked a sharp change from the trend earlier this week, when calls ran heavily against the plan Mr. Clinton discussed Monday night.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | November 13, 1990
RECENT political events -- the budget clash and the midterm elections -- confirm that America is ready for a new opposition economic program. In the 1980s, the opposition program was Reaganism. But Reaganomics has clearly worn out its welcome.What new axis of political choice will replace the circa-1980 choice of the New Deal versus the supply side? Some recent books help shed light on that question.Michael Barone's encyclopedic "Our Country" reminds us that the political map etched in our consciousness in Franklin Roosevelt's day no longer describes America.
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau | February 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's new energy tax -- a compendium of levies on the heat content of oil, coal, natural gas, nuclear power and hydroelectricity -- would barely be noticed at first.Four years from now, it could cost the average American family between $8 and $12 a month; or considerably less if the government's attempt to change the nation's energy habits pays off.Based on current energy use, a Maryland family with one car could expect to pay between $96 and $118 a year more for gasoline and utilities by July 1996, when the tax is fully implemented, based on figures provided by Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. and the Federal Highway Administration and the Energy Department.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Staff Writer | February 19, 1993
ST. LOUIS -- Like a master traveling salesman with a suitcase full of potent if bitter elixirs, President Clinton hit the road yesterday hoping to persuade the American people that his prescription of spending cuts and tax increases would fix the ailing economy.Fresh from Wednesday night's address outlining his strategy for economic recovery -- and hoping to capitalize on public goodwill reflected in overnight polls -- Mr. Clinton plunged right into the heartland and, appropriately, right into a shopping mall to sell his wares.
NEWS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | February 19, 1993
President Clinton's broad-based energy tax plan will disproportionately hurt the nation's transportation industry, particularly airlines, and could push struggling companies over the edge, industry representatives said yesterday.The plan outlined by Mr. Clinton Wednesday evening would increase the cost of natural gas, electricity, coal and oil through a tax applied to the energy content of all fuels, as measured by the British thermal unit, or Btu.The proposed tax would be more than twice as high on petroleum products, such as gasoline and diesel fuel, as on other energy sources.
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