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NEWS
May 16, 2013
In a recent Sun article, "Labor officials bring minimum wage push to Baltimore" (May 14), a researcher from the labor union-supported Economic Policy Institute claims that the "majority of minimum-wage earners work for large companies in the retail, fast-food and hospitality sectors, not for small businesses. " This is not true: Two-thirds of lower-wage workers are at businesses with 100 or more employees, not "large companies. " These 100-employee businesses could just as well be a small restaurant franchisee with five locations or a regional grocery store chain with three locations.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
Rep. Elijah E. Cummings urged state lawmakers Monday to raise Maryland's minimum wage to $10.10, arguing that lower wages will continue to strain government programs that help the poor. The Baltimore Democrat added his voice to a chorus of Democratic leaders backing Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposal, which would increase the minimum hourly rate from $7.25 and tie future wage hikes to the rate of inflation. Speaking at a hearing of the Senate Finance Committee, Cummings said workers who earn the current minimum wage depend heavily on public assistance to make ends meet.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 14, 1992
Two labor economists have reported that the pay of most college-educated people -- once thought to be exempt from the wage stagnation that has afflicted most Americans for more than 15 years -- has failed since 1989 to keep up with inflation.The findings, published yesterday by the Economic Policy Institute, a Washington research organization that often supports Democratic candidates, suggest that the more the high-paying jobs vanish from the workplace, the less a bachelor of arts degree becomes a ticket to a rising income -- a conclusion that other economists said was probably accurate.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | February 11, 2014
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown will stand in for Gov. Martin O'Malley in making the administration's case to a House committee Tuesday for raising Maryland's minimum wage. O'Malley had been scheduled to testify before the House Economic Matters Committee , in one of his last appearances before the General Assembly.  But he will instead attend the funeral of Baltimore construction magnate and philanthropist Willard Hackerman , who died Monday at age 95. The House panel will hear from a bevy of supporters and opponents of increasing the state's lowest hourly pay rate in stages to $10.10 an hour by 2016.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | February 11, 2014
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown will stand in for Gov. Martin O'Malley in making the administration's case to a House committee Tuesday for raising Maryland's minimum wage. O'Malley had been scheduled to testify before the House Economic Matters Committee , in one of his last appearances before the General Assembly.  But he will instead attend the funeral of Baltimore construction magnate and philanthropist Willard Hackerman , who died Monday at age 95. The House panel will hear from a bevy of supporters and opponents of increasing the state's lowest hourly pay rate in stages to $10.10 an hour by 2016.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
Rep. Elijah E. Cummings urged state lawmakers Monday to raise Maryland's minimum wage to $10.10, arguing that lower wages will continue to strain government programs that help the poor. The Baltimore Democrat added his voice to a chorus of Democratic leaders backing Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposal, which would increase the minimum hourly rate from $7.25 and tie future wage hikes to the rate of inflation. Speaking at a hearing of the Senate Finance Committee, Cummings said workers who earn the current minimum wage depend heavily on public assistance to make ends meet.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Lawmakers in Annapolis waded into a fraught debate over raising Maryland's minimum wage Tuesday, as advocates for workers and business owners used statistics and emotional appeals to square off on whether a higher rate would help the working poor or cost them jobs. Gov. Martin O'Malley , making one of his last appearances before the General Assembly, joined Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown in telling the House Economic Matters Committee that raising the state's lowest hourly wage from $7.25 to $10.10 over the next two years would be good for business and the right thing to do. The measure would index the wage to increase automatically with the cost of living, and it would raise the base pay of waiters and other workers who earn tips.
NEWS
February 3, 2013
The latest report from the nonpartisan Economic Policy Institute makes a compelling case for raising the minimum wage, nationally and in Maryland. Legislation introduced last week in Annapolis would raise the minimum from $7.25 an hour to $10 in two years and keep it indexed to inflation - a move that EPI says will not only put $778 million more in the pockets of Maryland workers but create 4,280 new jobs from increased economic activity generated by the higher pay. We know that the reaction to many in the business community will be, as it has always been, unyielding opposition.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | August 27, 2013
The good news as Labor Day approaches: Jobs are returning. The bad news: Most of them pay lousy wages and provide low, if not nonexistent, benefits. The trend toward lousy wages began before the Great Recession. According to a new report from the Economic Policy Institute, weak wage growth between 2000 and 2007, combined with wage losses for most workers since then, means that the bottom 60 percent of working Americans are earning less now than 13 years ago. This is also part of the explanation for why the percentage of Americans living below the poverty line has been increasing even as the economy has started to recover - from 12.3 percent in 2006 to around 14 percent this year.
NEWS
By V. Dion Haynes and The Washington Post | April 5, 2010
The increase in jobs highlighted in the nation's most recent unemployment report carried the sound of economic promise, but Obama administration officials warned on Sunday that the public shouldn't expect any dramatic improvement in the jobless rate, largely because of the effect of thousands of "discouraged" unemployed people who have resumed their search for work. Some economists assert that the unemployment rate, which held steady at 9.7 percent in March, is likely to be driven higher as many more such people are lured into looking for work by hopeful signs of recovery.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Lawmakers in Annapolis waded into a fraught debate over raising Maryland's minimum wage Tuesday, as advocates for workers and business owners used statistics and emotional appeals to square off on whether a higher rate would help the working poor or cost them jobs. Gov. Martin O'Malley , making one of his last appearances before the General Assembly, joined Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown in telling the House Economic Matters Committee that raising the state's lowest hourly wage from $7.25 to $10.10 over the next two years would be good for business and the right thing to do. The measure would index the wage to increase automatically with the cost of living, and it would raise the base pay of waiters and other workers who earn tips.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | August 27, 2013
The good news as Labor Day approaches: Jobs are returning. The bad news: Most of them pay lousy wages and provide low, if not nonexistent, benefits. The trend toward lousy wages began before the Great Recession. According to a new report from the Economic Policy Institute, weak wage growth between 2000 and 2007, combined with wage losses for most workers since then, means that the bottom 60 percent of working Americans are earning less now than 13 years ago. This is also part of the explanation for why the percentage of Americans living below the poverty line has been increasing even as the economy has started to recover - from 12.3 percent in 2006 to around 14 percent this year.
NEWS
July 29, 2013
It should surprise no one that President Barack Obama has been turning his attention of late to income inequality. In a speech last week and in a follow-up interview with The New York Times, he fretted about the widening gap between the wealthy and the middle class, the nation's "fraying" social fabric and how it might worsen racial tensions. Those are legitimate concerns. As much as the economy has improved during Mr. Obama's time in the White House, the recovery has not produced sufficient jobs or income growth.
NEWS
May 16, 2013
In a recent Sun article, "Labor officials bring minimum wage push to Baltimore" (May 14), a researcher from the labor union-supported Economic Policy Institute claims that the "majority of minimum-wage earners work for large companies in the retail, fast-food and hospitality sectors, not for small businesses. " This is not true: Two-thirds of lower-wage workers are at businesses with 100 or more employees, not "large companies. " These 100-employee businesses could just as well be a small restaurant franchisee with five locations or a regional grocery store chain with three locations.
NEWS
February 3, 2013
The latest report from the nonpartisan Economic Policy Institute makes a compelling case for raising the minimum wage, nationally and in Maryland. Legislation introduced last week in Annapolis would raise the minimum from $7.25 an hour to $10 in two years and keep it indexed to inflation - a move that EPI says will not only put $778 million more in the pockets of Maryland workers but create 4,280 new jobs from increased economic activity generated by the higher pay. We know that the reaction to many in the business community will be, as it has always been, unyielding opposition.
NEWS
By V. Dion Haynes and The Washington Post | April 5, 2010
The increase in jobs highlighted in the nation's most recent unemployment report carried the sound of economic promise, but Obama administration officials warned on Sunday that the public shouldn't expect any dramatic improvement in the jobless rate, largely because of the effect of thousands of "discouraged" unemployed people who have resumed their search for work. Some economists assert that the unemployment rate, which held steady at 9.7 percent in March, is likely to be driven higher as many more such people are lured into looking for work by hopeful signs of recovery.
NEWS
July 29, 2013
It should surprise no one that President Barack Obama has been turning his attention of late to income inequality. In a speech last week and in a follow-up interview with The New York Times, he fretted about the widening gap between the wealthy and the middle class, the nation's "fraying" social fabric and how it might worsen racial tensions. Those are legitimate concerns. As much as the economy has improved during Mr. Obama's time in the White House, the recovery has not produced sufficient jobs or income growth.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2012
They're facing high unemployment, depressed wages and loads of debt — and they're only in their 20s. Welcome to life after college. Though the labor market is recovering slowly, graduates this spring have only slightly better chances of landing jobs than grads did in the depths of the recession, experts say. Over the last year, unemployment has averaged 9.4 percent for college graduates under age 25. Meanwhile, researchers at the Washington-based Economic...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 14, 1992
Two labor economists have reported that the pay of most college-educated people -- once thought to be exempt from the wage stagnation that has afflicted most Americans for more than 15 years -- has failed since 1989 to keep up with inflation.The findings, published yesterday by the Economic Policy Institute, a Washington research organization that often supports Democratic candidates, suggest that the more the high-paying jobs vanish from the workplace, the less a bachelor of arts degree becomes a ticket to a rising income -- a conclusion that other economists said was probably accurate.
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