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Economic Performance

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BUSINESS
July 11, 1998
Maryland improved its grades in two of three categories on a widely watched economic score card this year but dropped a notch in "economic performance."The Corporation for Enterprise Development, a Washington-based research group promoting business growth and social fairness, gave Maryland an A for development capacity, up from a C last year, and a B for business vitality, up from a D.But moderate job growth got the state a C for economic performance, down from a B last year.The group usually gives Maryland high grades for development capacity, and it did so again this year, citing the state's "top-notch technology resources and excellent infrastructure."
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2012
Baltimore's economic performance over the last year ranks it 179th among the 300 largest metropolitan economies worldwide, according to a new report that describes the region as "partially recovered" from the last recession. The Brookings Institution's Global MetroMonitor study, to be released today, looked at growth in employment and gross domestic product in metro areas internationally. Only two of the country's large metro areas cracked the top 50 - Houston and San Jose - and just three (Dallas, Knoxville and Pittsburgh)
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BUSINESS
January 14, 1991
With a decline of 0.43 percent, Baltimore's economic performance slid to 44th place among the 75 largest metropolitan areas during the third quarter of 1990, according to a survey released today by Alphametrics Corp.Alphametrics, an economic research firm based in Bala Cynwyd, Pa., also reported that the Washington area ranked 71st on its Economic Performance for Cities report, with a plunge of 3.06 percent during the quarter.The third-quarter EPIC report gave continued evidence of an advancing national recession, with 42 out of 75 metropolitan areas reporting negative growth -- a result that an Alphametrics senior economist characterized as "pockets of sunshine on a generally overcast landscape."
BUSINESS
By Bill Sing | September 21, 2005
The Federal Reserve chose inflation-fighting over public relations yesterday, raising its benchmark short-term interest rate by another quarter-point to 3.75 percent against suggestions that it pause in deference to Hurricane Katrina. The 9-1 vote to raise the federal funds target rate by another quarter percentage point to puts the key interest rate at its highest level since August 2001. In response to the Fed's action, commercial banks began raising their prime lending rates by a corresponding amount, to 6.75 percent.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 1, 1998
MOSCOW -- Russia's ever-erratic President Boris N. Yeltsin removed three Cabinet ministers yesterday, making good on a threat issued two days earlier to punish the "culprits" of last year's lackluster economic performance.But the 67-year-old head of state explained the removal of the three officials as a "transfer to other positions," throwing in doubt whether his action was punitive or preparatory to new promotions.Those removed from the nearly 50-member Cabinet were: Transportation Minister Nikolai Tsakh, Education Minister Vladimir Kinelev, and Valery Serov, the deputy prime minister in charge of relations with other former Soviet republics.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr. and John H. Gormley Jr.,Staff Writer | April 16, 1992
It might come as something of a surprise to the thousands of Marylanders who lost their jobs during the current recession, but the state's economy is the second strongest in the nation,according to an annual "report card" from the Corporation for Enterprise Development.The ratings, released today, cheered state economic development officials. "We're gratified for the way they sized us up," said Mark Wasserman, secretary of the state's Department of Economic and Employment Development.However, some academics and economic development professionals question the rosy picture of the Maryland economy painted by the report.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2012
Baltimore's economic performance over the last year ranks it 179th among the 300 largest metropolitan economies worldwide, according to a new report that describes the region as "partially recovered" from the last recession. The Brookings Institution's Global MetroMonitor study, to be released today, looked at growth in employment and gross domestic product in metro areas internationally. Only two of the country's large metro areas cracked the top 50 - Houston and San Jose - and just three (Dallas, Knoxville and Pittsburgh)
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | April 26, 1997
PENDULUMS SWING, in democratic politics, for a number of reasons. The most frequent is poor economic performance.This is not, however, why the Labor Party will almost certainly come to power in the general election in Britain Thursday.Britain's economic performance under John Major's Conservative government is better than anyone anticipated. Unemployment just went down again.Another frequent reason is that the party in power has lost touch with voters' wants and fears. That's not it, either.
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | June 7, 1997
THE TROUBLE WITH elections as a system of democratic choice is that people don't vote right. This is vexing to rulers.Nonetheless, elections are fashionable, in either form or substance, in more and more countries. This has reached epidemic proportions.Elections are supposed to reward governments for good economic performance and punish them for bad, even if their policies had little to do with it.Not always. On the strength of economic performance, the British Conservative government of John Major and the Irish coalition government of John Bruton were the best their countries had seen and deserved perpetuation.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | May 6, 1993
Despite suffering repeated budget shortfalls and the nation's fifth-worst rate of job loss last year, Maryland still had the second-best economy in the country, according to a Washington consulting firm.But several economists have criticized the report for painting too rosy a picture of an economy that is trying to shake off the effects of a recession that was deeper and longer than anyone had predicted.The Corporation for Economic Development (CFED), which each year issues a report card ranking the states' economies, said only Colorado had a better economy than Maryland in 1992, though Utah and Washington also tied for second place.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2004
U.S. employers added 32,000 jobs to their payrolls last month, the smallest gain this year and another sign of sharply downshifting economic growth. Economists expected about 230,000 new jobs in July, about seven times as many as were created, leaving them pondering whether the second straight month of weak job growth is a trend or a short rough patch. With lackluster consumer spending in June, rising oil prices and falling stock prices as a backdrop, it's more paint on a grayer-than-expected economic portrait, prompting another round of heavy selling on the stock market yesterday.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 12, 2003
RIVERSIDE, Calif. - When Van Daele Communities, a builder, put eight new houses on sale here recently, 52 people camped out for as long as four days to have a chance to buy. "We've never seen it like this in 25 years," said Mike Van Daele, the company's chief executive. Housing prices are appreciating as much as $10,000 to $15,000 a week, he said. On the north side of town, new manufacturing plants stretch through what were once orange groves. Some are humming to life with companies making plastic bottles, stereo speakers and other products.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 12, 2003
SAGINAW, Mich. - They had already clocked out for the day, one employee said, but an announcement over the PA system called them back: We need help tidying the purse department. Another employee said she would punch out for lunch but be asked to stop during her break and compare prices at a competing store or pick up some office supplies. The complaints may seem like so much petty grumbling - 15 minutes of off-the-clock work here, an abbreviated lunch there. But when the company accused of incrementally shorting its workers of wages is Wal-Mart, the country's largest employer, with more than 1 million "associates" nationwide, the potential for free labor could add up to untold millions of dollars - out of the pockets of people who are already at the bottom of the pay scale and can least afford it. That the phenomenally profitable retailer would make such nickel-and-dime intrusions on their time was bad enough, employees say, but what particularly rankled was how they would then have to ask over and over again simply to be paid for the extra work.
BUSINESS
By Amanda J. Crawford | October 3, 1999
THE FEDERAL Reserve's Federal Open Market committee meets Tuesday to decide whether to boost interest rates for a third time this year. Last week a group of private and academic economists who call themselves the Shadow Open Market Committee, pointing to growth in the money supply, urged the Fed to raise rates further to head off inflation. But also last week, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco President Robert Parry said the central bank should be "more cautious" about raising interest rates because of the uncertainty of economic forecasts.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | July 27, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Nobody seems to have told Paul Wellstone, the low-profile second-term Democratic senator from Minnesota contemplating a long-shot presidential bid in 2000, that liberalism is dead, and public confidence in activist government along with it.While leading Republicans continue, rather successfully, to demonize the philosophy of strong benevolent government as the root of all political evil, and President Clinton rolls along as a self-styled New...
BUSINESS
July 11, 1998
Maryland improved its grades in two of three categories on a widely watched economic score card this year but dropped a notch in "economic performance."The Corporation for Enterprise Development, a Washington-based research group promoting business growth and social fairness, gave Maryland an A for development capacity, up from a C last year, and a B for business vitality, up from a D.But moderate job growth got the state a C for economic performance, down from a B last year.The group usually gives Maryland high grades for development capacity, and it did so again this year, citing the state's "top-notch technology resources and excellent infrastructure."
BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | April 23, 1991
Maryland's economic performance, though suffering from the recession, is still better than most of the nation and has won unusually high ratings in a "report card" survey of state economies.Only Maryland and Connecticut received straight As in the fifth annual report by the Washington-based Corporation for Enterprise Development, a non-profit economic consulting and research firm.The study grades economic performance, business vitality, development capacity, and state policy. Maryland is the only state to score straight As for three years in a row."
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | June 26, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The old chestnut "as sound as a dollar" took a battering last week, and so did the greenback, falling to a postwar low against the Japanese yen and a near-low against the German mark.The dollar had slumped so badly by Friday that the U.S. Federal Reserve and other central banks around the world sounded their equivalent of an alarm bell, buying billions of dollars in an effort to prop up the sagging American currency.With U.S. economic performance topping that of its major global rivals, how did the dollar become such a basket case that itrequired emergency treatment by week's end?
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 1, 1998
MOSCOW -- Russia's ever-erratic President Boris N. Yeltsin removed three Cabinet ministers yesterday, making good on a threat issued two days earlier to punish the "culprits" of last year's lackluster economic performance.But the 67-year-old head of state explained the removal of the three officials as a "transfer to other positions," throwing in doubt whether his action was punitive or preparatory to new promotions.Those removed from the nearly 50-member Cabinet were: Transportation Minister Nikolai Tsakh, Education Minister Vladimir Kinelev, and Valery Serov, the deputy prime minister in charge of relations with other former Soviet republics.
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | June 7, 1997
THE TROUBLE WITH elections as a system of democratic choice is that people don't vote right. This is vexing to rulers.Nonetheless, elections are fashionable, in either form or substance, in more and more countries. This has reached epidemic proportions.Elections are supposed to reward governments for good economic performance and punish them for bad, even if their policies had little to do with it.Not always. On the strength of economic performance, the British Conservative government of John Major and the Irish coalition government of John Bruton were the best their countries had seen and deserved perpetuation.
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