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NEWS
February 9, 1998
Highlights in Annapolis today:House of Delegates meets, 8 p.m., House chamber.Senate convenes at 8 p.m., Senate chamber.House Environmental Matters, Economic Matters and Appropriations committees briefed on health care for children with "special needs," 3 p.m., Joint Hearing Room, Legislative Services Building.Pub Date: 2/09/98
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Laura Smitherman and Timothy B. Wheeler and Laura Smitherman,SUN REPORTERS | April 8, 2008
A bill that would have committed Maryland to fight global warming died in a House committee last night after lobbying from industry and from factory workers fearful for their jobs. The Economic Matters Committee voted against the measure, which had been endorsed by Gov. Martin O'Malley and had passed the Senate, albeit in a weakened form. The bill would have mandated a 25 percent reduction by 2020 in greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, which scientific authorities say are warming the climate.
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BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | August 8, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- After 2 1/2 years and more than half a million dollars, state officials are finally paying attention to an enormous report on making Maryland's economy competitive.At a hearing before the House Economic Matters Committee yesterday, the state's outgoing economic development chief pledged that his department will use the report and others to present the legislature with a full-fledged statewide development strategy by November.That strategy will rely on the work of the Johns Hopkins Institute for Policy Studies, among other groups around the state, according to J. Randall Evans, who announced last week that he will resign in September as secretary of economic and employment development.
NEWS
October 25, 2004
IN THE 1992 presidential election, with the nation struggling through its first jobless recovery, Bill Clinton prevailed in part because his handlers realized early on, "It's the economy, stupid." Twelve years later, with household incomes falling during President Bush's first term, personal debt rising, family net worth sinking and America trying to break free of its second jobless recovery, that almost trite political logic should also be holding sway. Instead, the tight race between President Bush and Sen. John Kerry seems most about two sharply opposed views of America's role in the world, the Republicans' more imperialist stance vs. the Democrats' more internationalist posture.
BUSINESS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer | February 3, 1995
It was the kind of measure lawmakers dream about voting for: a bill that simultaneously cuts taxes for businesses and increases benefits for the unemployed.The Maryland House Economic Matters Committee, presented with such a bill yesterday (House Bill 217), voted for it unanimously and sent it to the full House for consideration.The measure would cut the surtax that every business in the state must pay for unemployment insurance from 1.7 percent of wages to 0.9 percent. The estimated savings to businesses: $112 million.
NEWS
October 25, 2004
IN THE 1992 presidential election, with the nation struggling through its first jobless recovery, Bill Clinton prevailed in part because his handlers realized early on, "It's the economy, stupid." Twelve years later, with household incomes falling during President Bush's first term, personal debt rising, family net worth sinking and America trying to break free of its second jobless recovery, that almost trite political logic should also be holding sway. Instead, the tight race between President Bush and Sen. John Kerry seems most about two sharply opposed views of America's role in the world, the Republicans' more imperialist stance vs. the Democrats' more internationalist posture.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Laura Smitherman and Timothy B. Wheeler and Laura Smitherman,SUN REPORTERS | April 8, 2008
A bill that would have committed Maryland to fight global warming died in a House committee last night after lobbying from industry and from factory workers fearful for their jobs. The Economic Matters Committee voted against the measure, which had been endorsed by Gov. Martin O'Malley and had passed the Senate, albeit in a weakened form. The bill would have mandated a 25 percent reduction by 2020 in greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, which scientific authorities say are warming the climate.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | June 20, 1994
After weeks of debate and accusations, the Annapolis City Council is set to vote tonight on the operating budget for fiscal 1995, which begins July 1.The finance committee, headed by a new chairman, spent most of last week trying to work out compromises that would win the support of a majority on the council.On Friday, the committee met for four hours before coming up with a list of amendments to the budget the finance committee proposed two weeks ago.The amendments to be introduced tonight include the elimination of seven city jobs, an increase in garbage fees from $188 to $200 a year per household in order to pay for twice-a-week garbage collection, and money to continue bus service on Riva Road to the health clinic.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 8, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Delegate-elect Alfred W. Redmer Jr. thought his professional background in insurance, financial planning and banking was a perfect fit for a seat on the House Economic Matters Committee.So did the Republican leadership in the House, which submitted Mr. Redmer's name to House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr., D-Kent, requesting that the Baltimore County Republican be appointed to Economic Matters.But when committee assignments were announced last month, Mr. Redmer found himself on the Environmental Matters Committee, a panel that deals with environmental and health issues and one that was not among the freshman's top three choices.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer | March 30, 1994
Elks clubs across Maryland and other men-only retreats such as Baltimore's posh Maryland Club could lose their liquor licenses under a bill passed by the state Senate yesterday.The measure would deny liquor licenses to private clubs with rules, regulations or bylaws that exclude members because of their race, sex, religion, physical handicap or national origin."It is very disappointing," said Frank Webber, Maryland spokesman for the Elks. If Elks clubs lose their liquor licenses, attendance will decline and there will be a commensurate drop in charitable giving, he predicted.
NEWS
February 9, 1998
Highlights in Annapolis today:House of Delegates meets, 8 p.m., House chamber.Senate convenes at 8 p.m., Senate chamber.House Environmental Matters, Economic Matters and Appropriations committees briefed on health care for children with "special needs," 3 p.m., Joint Hearing Room, Legislative Services Building.Pub Date: 2/09/98
BUSINESS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer | February 3, 1995
It was the kind of measure lawmakers dream about voting for: a bill that simultaneously cuts taxes for businesses and increases benefits for the unemployed.The Maryland House Economic Matters Committee, presented with such a bill yesterday (House Bill 217), voted for it unanimously and sent it to the full House for consideration.The measure would cut the surtax that every business in the state must pay for unemployment insurance from 1.7 percent of wages to 0.9 percent. The estimated savings to businesses: $112 million.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | June 20, 1994
After weeks of debate and accusations, the Annapolis City Council is set to vote tonight on the operating budget for fiscal 1995, which begins July 1.The finance committee, headed by a new chairman, spent most of last week trying to work out compromises that would win the support of a majority on the council.On Friday, the committee met for four hours before coming up with a list of amendments to the budget the finance committee proposed two weeks ago.The amendments to be introduced tonight include the elimination of seven city jobs, an increase in garbage fees from $188 to $200 a year per household in order to pay for twice-a-week garbage collection, and money to continue bus service on Riva Road to the health clinic.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer | March 30, 1994
Elks clubs across Maryland and other men-only retreats such as Baltimore's posh Maryland Club could lose their liquor licenses under a bill passed by the state Senate yesterday.The measure would deny liquor licenses to private clubs with rules, regulations or bylaws that exclude members because of their race, sex, religion, physical handicap or national origin."It is very disappointing," said Frank Webber, Maryland spokesman for the Elks. If Elks clubs lose their liquor licenses, attendance will decline and there will be a commensurate drop in charitable giving, he predicted.
NEWS
November 26, 1993
Decidedly UpbeatMy recent testimony before the House Economic Matters Committee was mischaracterized as presenting "a gloomy assessment of Maryland's economy." Lest there be any doubt, I am decidedly upbeat about our medium and long-term prospects.My current position carries with it a responsibility to present informed, objective assessments of the state economy from time to time. The initial thrust of my presentation was to explain why it has been that Maryland has suffered the effects of the recent recession more severely than much of the rest of the nation.
NEWS
March 28, 1993
MONDAYSENATE* Economic and Environmental Affairs: HB137, Maryland Office of Planning; HB236, Wildlife Management and Protection Fund; HB254, student assistance grants; HB704, negligent hunting; HB730, Maryland Public Broadcasting Commission; HB832, tourism and promotion; HB1018, nontidal wetlands; HB1376, State Board of Waterworks and Waste Systems operators; HB1536, culling standards for imported oysters; HJ22, Maryland energy policy, 1 p.m., Room 200.HOUSE*...
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 17, 1991
Annapolis--Toni Francfort, who lives on East Baltimore Street, is fed up. Her driving record is excellent, same as her husband's; neither has had an accident or a moving violation since the 1950s, said the 65-year-old Butcher's Hill resident, and she drives less than 10,000 miles a year.The punchline? "I pay $1,168 annually [in automobile insurance] for an '87 Dodge Aries, and that does not include collision" coverage, Ms. Francfort said.Only it's no joke, and it's a problem common to thousands of drivers in Baltimore and around the state: painfully high auto insurance rates.
NEWS
By Thomas V. DiBacco | February 23, 1993
THE CURRENT discussion of President Clinton's economic package reveals the Achilles heel of American democracy -- namely, that the economic wisdom of voters can result in collective nonsense rather than prudent decision making. Polls reveal that voters, for example, overwhelmingly support the president's package. No matter that package, it should be recalled, includes the president fighting a war in which one enemy (red ink) turns out to be an ally (spending).But citizens feel that (1) the economy and government are really in a mess tantamount to a war; ergo, it's their patriotic duty to support their leader; or (2)
NEWS
By Thomas V. DiBacco | February 23, 1993
THE CURRENT discussion of President Clinton's economic package reveals the Achilles heel of American democracy -- namely, that the economic wisdom of voters can result in collective nonsense rather than prudent decision making. Polls reveal that voters, for example, overwhelmingly support the president's package. No matter that package, it should be recalled, includes the president fighting a war in which one enemy (red ink) turns out to be an ally (spending).But citizens feel that (1) the economy and government are really in a mess tantamount to a war; ergo, it's their patriotic duty to support their leader; or (2)
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | August 8, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- After 2 1/2 years and more than half a million dollars, state officials are finally paying attention to an enormous report on making Maryland's economy competitive.At a hearing before the House Economic Matters Committee yesterday, the state's outgoing economic development chief pledged that his department will use the report and others to present the legislature with a full-fledged statewide development strategy by November.That strategy will rely on the work of the Johns Hopkins Institute for Policy Studies, among other groups around the state, according to J. Randall Evans, who announced last week that he will resign in September as secretary of economic and employment development.
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