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By Arda Ocal | October 15, 2012
WrestleMania 28, which took place April 1 in Miami, broke the record for economic impact that WrestleMania has on the host city, WWE announced Monday. The annual pay-per-view event, which drew 78,363 to Sun Life Stadium, generated 102.7 million dollars in economic impact, shattering the previous record set by WrestleMania 27 in Atlanta by $40 million. According to WWE, 71 percent of fans that attended WrestleMania 28 were from outside the Miami area and stayed in the city an average of four nights.
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By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
During its three-year run, Baltimore's Grand Prix IndyCar race cost the city about $1.4 million in increased staffing, overtime and related expenses. City officials disclosed the staffing costs in response to a Maryland Public Information Act request filed by The Baltimore Sun. Related expenses include items such as feeding workers during the event and purchasing ear plugs for them. When a major event is held in Baltimore, the city has to pay overtime for police, transportation workers, firefighters, paramedics and others to handle the needs of thousands of people in one place.
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NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Wondering how many tickets were sold to this year's Grand Prix of Baltimore?  Curious as to how the economic benefits of this city-subsidized event compare to last year's inaugural race? Well, you're going to have to just keep wondering.  Race On, the organizers of this year's race, announced yesterday it will not release the number of tickets sold to the three day festival.  Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration, which provided about $800,000 in city services to support the race and spent $7 million last year preparing downtown streets to serve as a race course, is not commissioning a study of the economic impact of this year's race.  Last year's "study confirmed what we know is an undisputed fact and that is the event has a significant positive economic impact," her spokesman Ryan O'Doherty said.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
The House of Representatives approved a bipartisan bill Saturday to provide back pay to 800,000 furloughed federal employees when the government shutdown ends. If approved by the Senate, the proposal would limit the economic impact of the shutdown. That's particularly true in Maryland, where tens of thousands of federal workers have been furloughed since agencies closed on Tuesday. The House voted 407-0 to approve the measure. "Federal workers didn't cause this shutdown and they shouldn't be punished for it," said Rep. John Delaney, a Maryland Democrat who cosponsored the bill.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | February 28, 2010
A trio of annual Baltimore events - Artscape, the book festival and the New Year's celebration at the Inner Harbor - generated an estimated $36 million in economic benefits during the past year, according to the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts. The estimate, to be released Monday, is part of a more sophisticated effort to attract additional corporate sponsors and justify continued public subsidies for the events. "The impact [of the three events], regionally, is huge," said Bill Gilmore, executive director of BOPA, a private, nonprofit organization that works exclusively for the city.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2012
General Motors' manufacturing plant in White Marsh lost about a day and a half to Cyclone Sandy. But it sustained no damage, missed no shipping deadlines and expected to quickly make up for lost time. Though that's just about the best-case scenario, it's not rare in the region. Despite the disruption of widespread shutdowns Monday and Tuesday, the Baltimore area missed the worst of Sandy's wallop. The overall economic impact should be modest as a result, economists say, even if for some businesses and residents it was anything but. "Economically, it doesn't mean much for the Baltimore area," said Richard Clinch, director of economic research for the University of Baltimore's Jacob France Institute.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
Baltimore residents might never know how much money the city's second Grand Prix race generated or how it affected local hotels, restaurants and other businesses. A spokesman for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Tuesday that the city would not commission an economic impact study of this year's Labor Day weekend event, as it did last year for the inaugural racing festival. City and racing officials also said they might not publicly reveal the number of spectators; last year 160,000 people attended over the three days.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2012
Arts and culture activity in the city had a $388.2 million total economic impact in 2010, according to a study released Friday by the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts. A previous version of the study, conducted every five years, found a $270 million impact in 2005. The study, Arts & Economic Prosperity IV, was conducted by the nonprofit Americans for the Arts. For 2010, it identifies about $266 million in total direct expenditures by nonprofit arts and culture organizations, and about $122 million in total direct expenditures by their audiences.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2011
City officials are calling the Baltimore Grand Prix an economic success, but a new study conducted for the city's tourism arm suggests that it funneled far less money to local businesses than race organizers predicted. The report for Visit Baltimore, released Friday, estimates that spectators from outside the Baltimore region, non-local vendors and race promoters spent almost $28 million in and near the city during the Labor Day weekend event. Baltimore Racing Development, the financially beleaguered race organizer, issued its own report last year that projected about $70 million in race-fueled spending.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley Monday announced something that had been widely known in Baltimore at least for the last two weeks: That the Netflix series "House of Cards" was back in town to film its second season. The White House Correspondents Dinner in Washington Saturday night opened with a spoof featuring Kevin Spacey that was filmed on the "House of Cards" set. And crew members have been working for the last two weeks inside the Baltimore Sun building on Calvert Street rebuilding the "House of Cards" newsroom set. But principal photography on the the second season officially started today, according to the Maryland Film Office.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2013
Panda Power Funds, a private equity firm based in Dallas, said Monday that it plans to build and operate a power plant in Brandywine. The natural gas-fueled generating station will be able to supply power to about 859,000 homes in the Maryland-Washington area, the company said. Panda Power said the area's economy is expected to get a $1.2 billion shot in the arm during the construction and first decade of the 859-megawatt plant's operation. Gwen S. McCall, president and CEO of Prince George's County Economic Development Corp., said in a statement that the plant is expected to create up to 800 union construction jobs, 25 jobs to run the plant and 32 indirect jobs related to supporting the facility.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
Visit Baltimore announced increased sales Wednesday on the heels of news that Otakon, the largest convention held in the Inner Harbor in recent years, would relocate to D.C. in 2017. Visit Baltimore booked 477,764 room nights during fiscal year 2013 for future years, the third-highest total ever, the city's convention and visitors bureau said. It signed contracts for 35 "citywide" conventions, which have at least 1,200 attendees, during fiscal year 2013 according to the group's annual report and business plan.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2013
Childs Walker took a look at the mysterious process used to pick the location of the Major League All-Star Game for Tuesday's paper. It's clear why the Orioles -- and those working in tourism and sports marketing in the city -- covet the chance to host the game in 2016. The last time it was here, in 1993, the game delivered an economic impact of $31.4 million , according to city estimates. In 2013 dollars, that's $50 million. (For comparison's sake, the Grand Prix of Baltimore had an economic impact of about $47 million two years ago and $42 million in 2012 .)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
Only three years ago, Baltimore and Maryland were all but out of the TV and film production business. After the glory years of “Homicide,” “The Corner,” “The Wire” and tens of millions of HBO dollars spent here on Maryland crews and materials, state funding for incentives had ended, and Hollywood had left Baltimore in its rear view mirror for what looked like good. But last Monday, Media Rights Capital and Netflix were back in town with stars like Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright and all those big, white Haddad's trucks to start filming season two of “House of Cards,” a series that last year had an economic impact of $140 million on the area, according to the Maryland Film Office.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2013
The Baltimore Development Corp., the city's economic development agency, is looking for an outside consultant to provide an analysis of the city's "economic development landscape," according to a request for applications issued Tuesday. The consultant is being asked to assess the city's "existing economic conditions, obstacles, opportunities for expansion, and strengths," as well as identify "priorities and options to move the City's economy forward" and figure out a way "to track the success of new initiatives in terms of job growth, investment, and economic impact," according to the request for proposals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley Monday announced something that had been widely known in Baltimore at least for the last two weeks: That the Netflix series "House of Cards" was back in town to film its second season. The White House Correspondents Dinner in Washington Saturday night opened with a spoof featuring Kevin Spacey that was filmed on the "House of Cards" set. And crew members have been working for the last two weeks inside the Baltimore Sun building on Calvert Street rebuilding the "House of Cards" newsroom set. But principal photography on the the second season officially started today, according to the Maryland Film Office.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | April 1, 1992
Baltimore's new baseball stadium might advance downtown development and polish the state's international image. But the lasting economic impact on the region is tougher to estimate and will depend on the ability of Oriole Park at Camden Yards to keep fans coming back year after year.State officials predict the stadium will act as a magnet, luring fans from a wide area to spend money at attractions such as the Inner Harbor and National Aquarium. It also will add to the region's quality of life, helping to persuade businesses to move plants and offices here, the officials predict.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
The House of Representatives approved a bipartisan bill Saturday to provide back pay to 800,000 furloughed federal employees when the government shutdown ends. If approved by the Senate, the proposal would limit the economic impact of the shutdown. That's particularly true in Maryland, where tens of thousands of federal workers have been furloughed since agencies closed on Tuesday. The House voted 407-0 to approve the measure. "Federal workers didn't cause this shutdown and they shouldn't be punished for it," said Rep. John Delaney, a Maryland Democrat who cosponsored the bill.
NEWS
By Erek L. Barron | January 7, 2013
This just in: Maryland civil legal service programs not only benefit the poor but also save the state millions per year. Legal assistance to low-income Marylanders is a significant economic boost to the state and benefits more than just those receiving aid, according to a report just released by the Maryland Judiciary's Access to Justice Commission. Legal services mean a lot more than just helping people without means get access to the courts. For example, these services help low-income residents receive the government benefits to which they are entitled; prevent homelessness by avoiding eviction; and help protect against domestic violence.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2013
The Ravens and Redskins will host playoff games Sunday, about 30 miles and 31/2 hours apart. Hosting two of the NFL's four playoff games in Maryland offers something of an economic double shot for the state. The games bring an increase in local taxes, a significant boost to the host teams' bottom lines and could have a combined economic impact of about $20 million to more than $40 million. But economists say most of the money being spent in Baltimore and Landover this weekend would have been spent in the area anyway.
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