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By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2012
Baltimore County will continue to see slow economic growth in 2012, an economist told the county's Spending Affordability Committee on Wednesday at its first meeting of the year. "We know that the economic recovery continues to be quite fragile," Anirban Basu of Sage Policy Group told the committee. He predicted personal income would grow between 4 percent and 4.5 percent in fiscal year 2012, which ends June 30. That's compared to about 4.6 percent in the previous fiscal year.
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NEWS
Peter Morici | July 1, 2014
Economists should be bound by facts and reason. I simply can't embrace liberal positions on the minimum wage, climate change and gender discrimination, and call myself a scientist. Let's take them one by one: The minimum wage: The Congressional Budget Office estimates that raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 an hour, as President Obama proposes, would eliminate 500,000 to 1,000,000 jobs. Businesses will be forced to raise prices, thereby reducing purchases (If beef or a plumber's visit gets too high, folks eat more chicken and fix their own faucets)
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NEWS
By Francisco J. Sanchez | March 12, 2012
Today marks the second anniversary of President Barack Obama's National Export Initiative (NEI), an ambitious effort to double U.S. exports by the end of 2014 and support millions of American jobs. In 2011, U.S. goods and services exports reached a record $2.1 trillion and supported the growth of American businesses across the country. Moreover, our economy has added private sector jobs for 24 straight months. Cities like Baltimore are fueling America's exporting growth. According to new data from the Department of Commerce's International Trade Administration (ITA)
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
Maryland's economy has grown almost without fail in the last quarter-century, ticking up year after year. But not in 2013. That's according to early estimates from the U.S. Department of Commerce, which showed Maryland's gross domestic product stagnating last year - putting the state near the bottom of the national pack. Only the District of Columbia and Alaska fared worse. It's another indication that 2013 wasn't great for Maryland, where federal budget cuts had an outsized effect because of the state's big cluster of federal contractors and agencies.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Maryland's economy didn't grow last year, according to gross domestic product estimates released Wednesday. The state's GDP remained unchanged, ranking it near the bottom of the country, the U.S. Department of Commerce said. GDP growth was worse only in Washington, D.C., where it fell by half a percent, and in Alaska, down 2.5 percent. Government was the sector that took the largest bite out of Maryland's economy last year. Federal budget cuts rippled through the region, creating drag on neighboring states as well.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 3, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Signs that the pace of economic growth may slow in the months ahead spread yesterday when the government said its main forecasting index was unchanged in April.The reading followed a March gain as large as any since Bill Clinton's inauguration as president.A separate Commerce Department report showed the nation's factories obtaining slightly fewer orders in April, an indication of diminished prospects for what has been a vigorous industrial sector.Still other official figures found first-time claims for unemployment benefits rising on a four-week average to the highest levels in over a year, when weather-induced layoffs in February are disregarded.
BUSINESS
By Asahi News Service | December 5, 1990
TOKYO -- The twin economic locomotives of personal consumption and capital investment that have led Japan's economic growth for four years seem to be losing steam, according to the results of economic surveys released Monday."
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | June 2, 1995
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks rose yesterday as expectations for an economic resurgence later this year helped technology issues and hurt stocks that do best in a slowdown.Optimism that economic growth will pick up speed in the second half of 1995 boosted stocks of companies such as United Technologies Corp. whose profits move up and down along with the economy.That same outlook lessened the appeal of Coca-Cola Co. and Procter & Gamble Co."The economy is not going into a hole," said Graham Tanaka, president of Tanaka Capital Management, which manages about million in assets.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | July 23, 1994
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks eked out gains for a second day yesterday as expectations of an economic slowdown tempered optimism about earnings at Apple Computer Inc. and Microsoft Corp.As long as concern persists that the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates and curtail economic growth, even robust earnings at technology bellwethers aren't enough to rally an industry group, let alone the entire market, said Philip Tasho, portfolio manager at Shawmut Investment Advisers, which manages about $14 billion.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff | July 9, 1995
The mid-Atlantic economy is among the slowest in the nation, as manufacturing companies continue to move out in search of cheaper labor, land and taxes. And with a Republican Congress drafting budget cuts aimed at wiping out the federal deficit, the WEFA Group, a Philadelphia-based consultancy, has forecast that reduced U.S. government spending could cost Maryland 100,000 jobs over the next decade.That scenario comes at a time that a slowing national economy prompted the Federal Reserve last week to trim interest rates a quarter point in the hope of preserving its "soft landing" strategy -- heading off inflation without precipitating a recession.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Maryland's economy didn't grow last year, according to gross domestic product estimates released Wednesday. The state's GDP remained unchanged, ranking it near the bottom of the country, the U.S. Department of Commerce said. GDP growth was worse only in Washington, D.C., where it fell by half a percent, and in Alaska, down 2.5 percent. Government was the sector that took the largest bite out of Maryland's economy last year. Federal budget cuts rippled through the region, creating drag on neighboring states as well.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | March 12, 2014
Do you recall a time in America when the income of a single schoolteacher or baker or salesman or mechanic was enough to buy a home, have two cars and raise a family? I remember. My father (who just celebrated his 100th birthday) earned enough for the rest of us to live comfortably. We weren't rich but never felt poor, and our standard of living rose steadily through the 1950s and 1960s. That used to be the norm. For three decades after World War II, America created the largest middle class the world had ever seen.
NEWS
January 31, 2014
It seems strange to celebrate the return of a ship that hasn't left yet, but that's what the recent announcement that the Carnival Pride will be sailing out of Baltimore beginning in March of 2015 amounts to. Last summer, Carnival Cruise Lines announced the ship would begin sailing out of Tampa, Florida beginning this November, and now, like a reliable snow bird, it's planning a return to Northern climes after just a few months in the Sunshine state....
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2014
Maryland employers could pick up the pace of job creation to 40,000 positions this year, according to some forecasts, but one local economist expects a slowdown instead. Moody's Analytics and Towson University's Regional Economic Studies Institute expect fairly broad-based job growth in 2014 - they're both predicting about 40,000 positions added in the state, which would be the best performance in years. Full results for 2013 aren't in yet, but Maryland employers added about 34,000 jobs in the 12 months ending in November, according to federal estimates.
NEWS
December 7, 2013
I was pleased to see that the mayor's office is concerned about Baltimore's climate for investment and economic growth ( "City to study ways to improve Baltimore economic and business climate Dec. 3). I am certain the consultant will have suggestions that are worth $167,500. But I would like to suggest that the mayor meet first with Professor Stephen Walters, a talented economist at Loyola University and the John Hopkins University Institute for Applied Economics. Professor Walters has studied the Baltimore problem and has some excellent ideas.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2013
Glen Burnie food products company Allied International Corp. might have a global-infused name, but it sold nothing outside the country before 2008. Now it exports to 45 countries, accounting for nearly 20 percent of the small firm's revenue. This is exactly what export proponents want to see more of in the Baltimore region - and nationally - as a way to propel economic growth. Exports accounted for an expanding but still fairly slim portion of the metro area's economic activity last year.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1992
This is how brokerage firms and economists look at 1992:*Kidder, Peabody & Co. Inc.December 1991As we enter 1992, the recovery appears extremely vulnerable. It will be sustained, however, by the lowest short-term interest rates in the past two decades, an accommodative Federal Reserve, and a government commitment to put the economy back on track.Contrary to the dismal forecasts from the doomsayers, the economy will emerge from recession. The apparent sudden sinking of the economy in the fourth quarter of 1991 has blinded many to the favorable factors supporting an economic recovery.
NEWS
By Edwin Chen and Joel Havemann and Edwin Chen and Joel Havemann,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 10, 2005
CRAWFORD, Texas - President Bush expressed new confidence in the economy yesterday, declaring that his policies have laid "the foundation for sustained growth." But he said he was concerned that growth could be slowed by the rising costs of energy and health care. "In terms of ... the effect interest rates will have on our economy, I think we're more concerned about energy prices and health care prices," Bush said. "Those are the two areas that we see as having a greater effect on ... the future of economic growth."
NEWS
September 5, 2013
Only two words come to mind in response to the latest missive from the Greater Baltimore Committee wherein 52 CEOs say Maryland's highest priority for economic growth and job creation ought to be reforming the state's tax structure to make it more competitive: Good idea. That the region's business leaders think the state's tax structure is hurting the "business climate" is none too shocking. We have yet to visit the state where business leaders never grouse about taxes and the vicissitudes of government — state, federal and local.
NEWS
By Jacob Hacker and Nate Loewentheil | August 12, 2013
Everyone has heard that tackling poverty and inequality is bad for the economy. This is the dilemma that economist Arthur Okun, writing in the 1970s, called "The Big Trade-Off" - equality and efficiency are at odds. Yet more and more research and real-world experience suggest just the opposite. If there is a "Big Trade-Off," it is not between equality and efficiency. It is between policies that enrich the most fortunate and a broader distribution of opportunity that helps all Americans.
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