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NEWS
By George A. Pieler and Jens F. Laurson | January 15, 2007
The newly Democratic Congress is spouting neo-populism, and that means change, and new concerns for the global economy. Commentators have warned that the Democrats might revive nativist-protectionist forces in the U.S. body politic. Free trade may not have "left the building," as one observer recently asserted, but its lease may become a lot more expensive. There have been stirrings of discontent over foreign investment, hostility toward cutting agricultural subsidies to advance the Doha round of trade talks, and tax penalties on U.S. companies operating overseas.
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NEWS
January 11, 2013
No political party enjoys losing an election, but a healthy party reacts to defeat - after a suitable period of grieving - by trying to figure out what went wrong. That's what Democrats did in the late 1980s after a string of failed presidential campaigns, and the process led to the election of Bill Clinton, a moderate Southern governor. And that's what many Republicans are trying to do now, after the defeat of Mitt Romney in November. They're pondering what went wrong and how the party needs to change.
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NEWS
By David M. Anderson | December 28, 2001
WASHINGTON -- If you say that Americans are seriously opposed to the idea of sacrificing civil and political liberties for other values, then you are saying something that is true. But if you say that Americans are seriously opposed to the idea of sacrificing freedom for other values, then you are saying something that is false. For 100 years, the American political system has restricted the economic freedom of individuals and corporations in order to promote values ranging from equality to public safety.
EXPLORE
December 29, 2012
There has been much discussion in the weeks since the 2012 election about the Republican Party and its current state. Losing an election often prompts a lot of hand-wringing by the defeated party and rejoicing by those on the other side of the aisle. I've seen a lot of interesting commentary about the future of the GOP. As a Republican elected official, I wanted to share some thoughts about my party. First of all, I believe many GOP positions often get misconstrued, not just by an unfriendly media or the opposing party, but even by our own side.
NEWS
By Carol Arscott | January 27, 1993
MY 8-year-old daughter looked over my shoulder as I read the newspaper on Sunday morning, her eyes concentrating on a photograph of the new first family. What did she think it would be like to be Chelsea Clinton, I asked her. She considered her answer for a few moments before she replied."Not so good. It would be hard," Leigh said. "She has to go to private school."Leigh, of course, had no idea why I found her response so amusing. I tried to explain why I had chuckled, but that was hard, too.How could an 8-year-old understand that Chelsea's parents had done absolutely nothing wrong, but had risked real political damage by making a personal decision in direct conflict with their public pronouncements?
NEWS
By Robert Reno | January 23, 2000
THE process of saving Chile from socialism turned out to be a squalid affair that lasted 17 years, during which Chilean democracy was extinguished by a particularly unattractive military dictatorship. What made it so offensive was that it often mimicked -- in extra-constitutional violence, sheer thuggery and naked oppression -- the very process by which various communist revolutionaries "saved" their nations from capitalism. And now Chile has another duly elected socialist president, Ricardo Lagos, cheered by crowds in Santiago this past week as he acknowledged the presence of the widow of the last duly elected socialist president, Salvador Allende.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | July 21, 1995
London. -- In freeing Aung San Suu Kyi from house arrest last week, Myanmar's corrupt generals have finally taken a significant step back toward 1990, when Miss Suu Kyi won over 60 percent of the vote.But whether the generals now take the road to democracy will depend on whether they judge it to be in their own economic interest. They may well persist in thinking that democracy is the enemy of progress, despite the evidence of 34 years of military rule, which has reduced their country to penury.
BUSINESS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | September 29, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Yes, it's true. Good news often gains less attention than bad.The World Bank recently pointed this out with a report on the world economy that found glowing news from all points of the compass."
NEWS
January 11, 2013
No political party enjoys losing an election, but a healthy party reacts to defeat - after a suitable period of grieving - by trying to figure out what went wrong. That's what Democrats did in the late 1980s after a string of failed presidential campaigns, and the process led to the election of Bill Clinton, a moderate Southern governor. And that's what many Republicans are trying to do now, after the defeat of Mitt Romney in November. They're pondering what went wrong and how the party needs to change.
EXPLORE
December 29, 2012
There has been much discussion in the weeks since the 2012 election about the Republican Party and its current state. Losing an election often prompts a lot of hand-wringing by the defeated party and rejoicing by those on the other side of the aisle. I've seen a lot of interesting commentary about the future of the GOP. As a Republican elected official, I wanted to share some thoughts about my party. First of all, I believe many GOP positions often get misconstrued, not just by an unfriendly media or the opposing party, but even by our own side.
NEWS
By George A. Pieler and Jens F. Laurson | January 15, 2007
The newly Democratic Congress is spouting neo-populism, and that means change, and new concerns for the global economy. Commentators have warned that the Democrats might revive nativist-protectionist forces in the U.S. body politic. Free trade may not have "left the building," as one observer recently asserted, but its lease may become a lot more expensive. There have been stirrings of discontent over foreign investment, hostility toward cutting agricultural subsidies to advance the Doha round of trade talks, and tax penalties on U.S. companies operating overseas.
NEWS
By Patrick Basham | July 8, 2005
WASHINGTON - The banner headline in Britain's News of the World read: "5 Billion People Can't Be Wrong!" Well, yes they can. There's no question that the best-selling British Sunday newspaper captured the post-Live 8 media spin. Now that several billion people have watched Live 8, the biggest event in the history of entertainment, the planet is allegedly mobilized to "Make Poverty History." But the conventional wisdom is wrong about public opinion and Live 8's politically fashionable organizers are wrong about the remedy for African poverty.
NEWS
By David M. Anderson | December 28, 2001
WASHINGTON -- If you say that Americans are seriously opposed to the idea of sacrificing civil and political liberties for other values, then you are saying something that is true. But if you say that Americans are seriously opposed to the idea of sacrificing freedom for other values, then you are saying something that is false. For 100 years, the American political system has restricted the economic freedom of individuals and corporations in order to promote values ranging from equality to public safety.
NEWS
By Robert Reno | January 23, 2000
THE process of saving Chile from socialism turned out to be a squalid affair that lasted 17 years, during which Chilean democracy was extinguished by a particularly unattractive military dictatorship. What made it so offensive was that it often mimicked -- in extra-constitutional violence, sheer thuggery and naked oppression -- the very process by which various communist revolutionaries "saved" their nations from capitalism. And now Chile has another duly elected socialist president, Ricardo Lagos, cheered by crowds in Santiago this past week as he acknowledged the presence of the widow of the last duly elected socialist president, Salvador Allende.
NEWS
By Andrew Bernstein | November 8, 1998
AS ANALYSTS debate whether the elections resulted in a net benefit for the Republicans or the Democrats, there is a better question to ask: Does it really matter? The debate over the elections assumes there is still some substantive distinction between the two parties. But is there?A recent New York Times article on the Senate race in that state observed that the two candidates - Republican Alfonse D'Amato and Democrat Charles Schumer - are not nearly so opposed on political ideology as is generally thought.
BUSINESS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | September 29, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Yes, it's true. Good news often gains less attention than bad.The World Bank recently pointed this out with a report on the world economy that found glowing news from all points of the compass."
NEWS
By Patrick Basham | July 8, 2005
WASHINGTON - The banner headline in Britain's News of the World read: "5 Billion People Can't Be Wrong!" Well, yes they can. There's no question that the best-selling British Sunday newspaper captured the post-Live 8 media spin. Now that several billion people have watched Live 8, the biggest event in the history of entertainment, the planet is allegedly mobilized to "Make Poverty History." But the conventional wisdom is wrong about public opinion and Live 8's politically fashionable organizers are wrong about the remedy for African poverty.
NEWS
By Andrew Bernstein | November 8, 1998
AS ANALYSTS debate whether the elections resulted in a net benefit for the Republicans or the Democrats, there is a better question to ask: Does it really matter? The debate over the elections assumes there is still some substantive distinction between the two parties. But is there?A recent New York Times article on the Senate race in that state observed that the two candidates - Republican Alfonse D'Amato and Democrat Charles Schumer - are not nearly so opposed on political ideology as is generally thought.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | July 21, 1995
London. -- In freeing Aung San Suu Kyi from house arrest last week, Myanmar's corrupt generals have finally taken a significant step back toward 1990, when Miss Suu Kyi won over 60 percent of the vote.But whether the generals now take the road to democracy will depend on whether they judge it to be in their own economic interest. They may well persist in thinking that democracy is the enemy of progress, despite the evidence of 34 years of military rule, which has reduced their country to penury.
NEWS
By Carol Arscott | January 27, 1993
MY 8-year-old daughter looked over my shoulder as I read the newspaper on Sunday morning, her eyes concentrating on a photograph of the new first family. What did she think it would be like to be Chelsea Clinton, I asked her. She considered her answer for a few moments before she replied."Not so good. It would be hard," Leigh said. "She has to go to private school."Leigh, of course, had no idea why I found her response so amusing. I tried to explain why I had chuckled, but that was hard, too.How could an 8-year-old understand that Chelsea's parents had done absolutely nothing wrong, but had risked real political damage by making a personal decision in direct conflict with their public pronouncements?
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