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NEWS
April 3, 1994
Last weekend's parliamentary elections pinpoint to one of the fundamental weaknesses of Ukraine. Instead of being a country with a single national identity, it is strongly Ukrainian in the west, divided or Russian in the east.This conflict of culture, language and identification would cause difficulties in the best of times. Unfortunately, these are not the best of times for Ukraine, which on paper should be one of the most important European countries on the basis of its population of 52 million.
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NEWS
By Jim Rosapepe | January 22, 2014
As Gov. Martin O'Malley makes his final state of the state speech Thursday, it's a good time to look at what seven years of his governorship have meant for Maryland. The state of the state is clearly good: first in median family income, a top three state in income mobility, first in K-12 education five years in a row. And Maryland has already recovered 99 percent of jobs lost in the Great Recession. These are hard facts. But such snapshots overstate and understate Mr. O'Malley's impact.
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NEWS
March 19, 1991
The Citizens Planning and Housing Association deserves congratulations for its third annual city series of public discussions. This year's opening forum explored arts, culture and recreation in our multi-ethnic city. It drew a capacity crowd. The remaining forums should be equally provocative.Education is the topic of the 7:30 forum tomorrow night at Morgan State's McKeldin Center. Issues ranging from whether curriculum should reflect pupils' race to whether various ethnic groups require different teaching methods will be discussed by a star-studded panel and President Calvin Burnett of Coppin State as moderator.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 3, 2012
Dear Year 2011: Goodbye and good riddance. Don't let the door hit you in the behind on your way out. Or, rather, let it hit you. You deserve it. How bad have you been? Let me count the ways: •The economy has been a nightmare. For all the new (insufficient) stimulus President Barack Obama tried to get to provide jobs and to rebuild the country's deplorably decaying bridges, roads and other infrastructure, his American Jobs Act has been pretty much a nonstarter. •In the disgraceful tug-of-war between the president and the practically-do-nothing Congress over entitlement cuts, tax increases and keeping the federal safety net for the neediest Americans from being shredded, both branches of government came up with a whopper of a black eye. •It took Mr. Obama nearly a year of knuckling under to the Republican obstructionists, particularly in the House, mugged repeatedly by the tea party freshmen, before he finally stood up to them in the final go-around on a paltry two-month extension of payroll tax and unemployment benefits.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The United States promised a package of measures to support Soviet "self-help" yesterday as President Bush made a new push to complete a long-range nuclear arms deal in time for a superpower summit by early July.Secretary of State James A. Baker III laid out a series of economic and political reforms the Soviets must make if they are to transform their country into "a democratic and prosperous society."And he warned against a "big bang" infusion of huge sums of aid, such as the Soviets seem to want, arguing that "these changes will take work over a long time."
NEWS
By Chief of The Sun's Washington Bureau | September 16, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The majority of people in Russia and the Ukraine "are not prepared for capitalism," have only an "embryonic" appreciation of pluralism and attach little importance to personal and political freedoms.These and other findings of a major poll by the Times Mirror Co. starkly demonstrate the difficulty confronting reformers trying to establish a new economic and political system in the former Soviet Union.The belief that people who make a profit are probably doing something illegal and a preference for state ownership of most businesses collide head-on with a stated wish for a "market economy."
NEWS
By STEPHEN J. SOLARZ | July 15, 1991
This week's Group of Seven meeting in London offers the industrialized democracies both a profound challenge and an historic opportunity. A creative Western response to the economic turmoil in the Soviet Union could facilitate a peaceful transition in that country from a state-controlled to a market economy and from a one-party dictatorship to a multi-party democracy. An imaginative and daring approach by the West could even pave the way for a generation of peace.With its economy in a free fall and its centralized political system under siege, the Soviet Union has reached the end of its communist road.
NEWS
By CARL UPCHURCH | February 22, 1994
This year's Black History Month should be the last. Let us end this tiresome ritual of parading our noble and precious African-American peacemakers, writers, scientists and trailblazers. It is but an annual sedative masking the plethora of social, economic and political diseases threatening to extinguish urban America.How easy it is to extol the virtues of a Carter G. Woodson or a Vernon Johns while ignoring the challenges inherent in confronting the institutional machinery that manufactures our malignant social ills.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | July 4, 1994
Cernobbio, Como, Italy. -- Decisions rarely are made at Group of 7 meetings, and if made they never are carried out. That comment has been made of past economic ''summits.'' It would be regrettable if it proves true of the meeting of chiefs of state that takes place this week in Naples. The international economy now is in a condition that poses social and political risks to the future of the industrial countries.Thus the interest in a mock G-7 meeting carried out last weekend at this Lake Como resort, at the invitation of the U.S. and Italy.
NEWS
By Jonathan Power | November 14, 1995
LONDON -- France's minister for overseas development, Jacques Godfrain, startled an international conference recently by suggesting that ''Africa is on the way to becoming the dragon of the 21st century'' -- following the pattern of the ''dragon'' economies of Asia.Thirty years ago, he said, few people predicted Asia's present stunning success. Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia were at war. Thailand was riven by internal conflict. Malaysia and Indonesia were battling communist insurrection, and South Korea was still emerging from the ruins of a debilitating war.Engines of growth''Today these countries have become 'dragons' with an annual growth of 7 percent or more,'' Mr. Godfrain said.
NEWS
April 12, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley drew the ire of some in Annapolis this week when he suggested members of the General Assembly had "choked" on two of his initiatives. But at least the governor has company: Lawmakers seemed to have an especially sensitive gag reflex this year when it came to much of their agenda. Governors and legislative leaders always find something to crow about after a 90-day session, but for the first year of a four-year gubernatorial term, the pickings are relatively slim.
NEWS
September 1, 2010
A call for legislative term limits has once again entered the political fray in Maryland. Among the more vocal proponents are state Sen. Andrew Harris, a Republican candidate for the First District congressional seat, and any number of General Assembly candidates. Although talk of term limits seemed to peak in the 1990s, its revival is hardly surprising considering the difficult economic times and the rise of populist candidates seeking to tap into voter frustration. Term limits have a certain appeal — if one's chief desire is to throw the rascals out. The problem is that term limits tend not to accomplish what its supporters are seeking.
NEWS
By Alison J. Dray-Novey | June 4, 2009
Demonstrations at Tiananmen 20 years ago grew out of a paradox that had been building in China since 1978, all through the era of rapid economic reform. To achieve its aims, the Chinese Communist Party wished to liberate people economically while continuing to constrain them politically. A version of this same tension persists today. Following the disastrous Cultural Revolution (1965-1970s), the party no longer could base its legitimacy on Maoist socialism. Marxist-Leninist ideology was virtually dead.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | October 14, 2007
POCOMOKE CITY // The chickens that Willis Redden raises in steel buildings longer than Navy destroyers produce at least 2 million pounds of manure a year. That's as much as a city of 25,000 people produces. Redden, a fourth-generation farmer, spreads the litter on corn and soybean fields near a sandy creek that flows into the Pocomoke River and then the Chesapeake Bay. But no one ever comes to check whether the manure is getting into the stream - even though scientists say chickens are responsible for 10 percent of the pollution running into the bay from Maryland.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff | March 18, 2007
Maryland has a tradition of stepping up to meet transportation challenges. The evidence is visible in such structures as the Bay Bridge, the tunnels under Baltimore Harbor and a network of well-maintained highways. It doesn't come easy or cheap. Periodically, a point comes where elected officials have to tell us to dig deeper into our pockets to ease traffic jams, keep the wheels on the bus and keep the economy humming. We're getting there again. The $27 billion in needs over a 20-year period identified by a blue-ribbon commission in 2000 has ballooned to $40 billion, driven in large part by soaring construction costs.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 18, 2004
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Zimbabwean actor Daves Guzha faced a challenge when he agreed to play the role of an African dictator loosely based on his country's president, Robert G. Mugabe: What, he wondered, makes a leader like Mugabe, whose repressive regime has plunged his country into economic and political chaos, tick? In his search for an answer, he pored through biographies, rode buses and stood in bread lines to hear citizens' complaints, studied the cadences of Mugabe's speech and explored nervous tics that he imagined might afflict an 80-year-old leader.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | September 3, 1992
Paris -- The racist violence in Germany during the past week results from the clash between a high-minded German determination never again to be implicated in political persecution and the deep nationalist and exclusionary instincts of any people suffering a crisis of jobs, prospects and identity.Skinheads are a peculiarly unattractive manifestation of the problem, joyfully attacking the hostels holding Gypsy, Vietnamese, African and East European foreigners who claim to be political refugees from their own countries and ask to be allowed to stay in Western Europe to do the hard and demeaning work Europeans themselves no longer care to do.But in East Germany, where unification has brought something like 50 percent unemployment as well as collapse of the social, economic and political structures of the communist state, these foreigners, who are provided with housing and subsistence money by the German state while awaiting judgment of their asylum demands, seem perversely privileged rivals to the former East Germans' own survival.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | November 19, 1992
Paris. -- The European Community has on its eastern and southeastern frontiers bloody war, communal savagery, refugees in the millions -- mounting economic and political crisis, and the risk of still more breakdowns.What preoccupies its leaders?How Francois Mitterrand can outwit his rivals during the final months of his mandate.How Conservative politicians in Britain can survive plainly incompetent leadership together with national economic dilapidation.How Helmut Kohl can make use of rightist emotions and xenophobia in Germany to keep the Social Democrats out of office and his party in.How Italy's Christian Democratic and Socialist power and money brokers can fight off the regional ''leagues'' and the threat of reform.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | March 3, 2002
CAIRO, Egypt - When Hosni Mubarak, the president of Egypt, comes to Washington this week, he will undoubtedly deliver the same message chanted like a mantra by Egyptian officials in this capital city - the United States' blind support of Israel is dangerously unhelpful in the abiding war with the Palestinians; putting Iraq in the "axis of evil" and threatening an attack on Saddam Hussein only make matters worse in the Middle East. The Egyptian media are saturated with reports on the daily bloodshed in Israel and the Israeli-occupied territories that describe Palestinian suicide attackers as "martyrs" and their acts as "sacrifices."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 26, 1999
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- Anyone want to invest in a bombed out, economically ravaged European pariah state?That's what friends and foes of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic are starting to ask even as NATO continues to pummel Serbia's cracked and increasingly demolished infrastructure.What will happen in Yugoslavia after the war ends is emerging as a topic of conversation among government insiders and business leaders.While the crisis over the Serbian province of Kosovo is rooted in history, religion and ethnic animosities, its resolution is the stuff of contemporary politics and economics.
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