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By Meredith Cohn | meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | December 23, 2009
As the holiday season approached, Kristy Myers sent a message on Twitter to see if anyone minded that she wasn't planning on mailing cards. When no one responded, Myers joined other environmentally conscious people and skipped the paper. It's one of many steps her family took to make this Christmas especially green - a trend that seems to be catching on locally and nationally as people begin applying their year-round ethos to the holidays. The economy surely is contributing to the cause, and may even be driving it, as many Earth-saving measures are also less costly.
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By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | June 19, 2009
This 1914 rowhouse will offer more green features than standard energy-efficient appliances. There will be bamboo floors, insulation made from old newspapers, a light-colored roof that reflects the sun and more. It's one of many area homes getting the eco-treatment, a movement growing in appeal with homeowners who want to lower utility bills and tread lightly on the planet. Only this house in Remington is being rehabbed by real estate investors. And when they put it on the market next month, it may illustrate just how far the trend has come - investors, lenders and construction companies of all sizes are joining governments, nonprofit groups and private owners in accepting that going green can make green, as in money.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | June 22, 2008
Students touched soil samples, tested water quality, identified tree species. The best of the state's Envirothon teams converged on Harford Glen Environmental Education Center last week to put their scientific knowledge to the test. The high school students from 19 Maryland counties were competing for the state championship. Harford Christian School, a Darlington-based private school, took the top prize Thursday after scoring 525 points out of 600. Harford Christian will represent the state for the 2008 Canon Envirothon, the national competition that will be held in Flagstaff, Ariz.
NEWS
May 7, 2008
A tree grows in Hurlock. And while this is not a tale of lost innocence as recounted in a New York borough by novelist Betty Smith, self-improvement and redemption do figure in this account. Improving the world in which we live and giving back - that's how Maryland Public Safety Secretary Gary D. Maynard would describe his inmate-staffed conservation corps that is planting trees and seedlings across Maryland. At last count, they had planted about 11,567 trees, including 1,650 in Hurlock.
NEWS
January 27, 2008
Keeping in mind Harford County's strong support of recycling and the benefits of "preserving the planet," it's good to remember the initial efforts of a lone ecology teacher at Bel Air High School back in 1972. He thought it was a good idea to recycle and therein began a classroom project that grew into a wave of right-mindedness when it came to "just tossing out the trash" and stepping up for a minute and separating glass, tin, paper, cardboard and aluminum into bags to be processed by his classroom volunteers.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | December 21, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Seven hundred miles west of Seattle in the Pacific at Ocean Station Papa, a first-of-its-kind buoy is anchored to monitor a looming environmental catastrophe. Forget about sea levels rising as glaciers and polar ice melt, and increasing water temperatures affecting global weather patterns. As the oceans absorb more and more carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, they're gradually becoming more acidic. And some scientists fear that the change might be irreversible. At risk are sea creatures up and down the food chain, from the tiniest phytoplankton and zooplankton to whales, from squid to salmon to crabs, coral, oysters and clams.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | November 10, 2007
Turn off a nondescript highway in Prince George's County, pass through an electronically controlled gate, drive a mile on a rutted one-lane road, and you'll find America's response to agricultural Armageddon. Here, on the south side of the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, researchers are raising trees from seeds in one of 28 federal repositories set up to ensure survival of the planet's agricultural products - and the humans who depend on them. These 64 acres of trees and shrubs, along with the seeds that produced them, contain genetic weapons to battle the droughts, blights and bugs often brought on by invasive species, habitat loss and climate change.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | September 16, 2007
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- American girls are entering puberty at earlier ages, putting them at far greater risk for breast cancer later in life and for all sorts of social and emotional problems well before they reach adulthood. Girls as young as 8 increasingly are starting to menstruate, develop breasts and grow pubic and underarm hair - biological milestones that only decades ago typically occurred at 13 or older. African-American girls are especially prone to early puberty. Theories abound as to what is driving the trend, but the exact cause or causes are not known.
NEWS
By Lisa Tom . and Lisa Tom .,Special to the Sun | September 5, 2007
On an ordinary weekday, Kathleen Tunney teaches seventh-grade Life Science at Burleigh Manor Middle School. But Friday, she and about 20 other teachers became students for the day. "It was funny how everyone went straight from being a teacher to [being a] student. It didn't take long to slip back to being 12 years old," said Tunney. On the school system's Professional Development Day, these middle school teachers visited the Girl Scouts of Central Maryland's Camp Ilchester and engaged in Project Wild activities designed for their students.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | August 15, 2007
Environmental issues would get top priority in Howard County government, with a new agency reporting directly to County Executive Ken Ulman if he adopts draft recommendations of a volunteer commission. The 21-member Commission on the Environment and Sustainability appointed by Ulman in February will recommend that the county create an Office of Environmental Sustainability, as well as take action on matters such as air and water quality, energy conservation and open space. The commission met yesterday to discuss details of its final report, scheduled to be presented to Ulman on Aug. 28, and plan a celebratory party for later that week.
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