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NEWS
December 27, 2002
IN ORDER TO SAVE the economy of the Chesapeake Bay region, we must save the ecology. The two are inextricably linked. That was the argument that Rep. Wayne Gilchrest used to help nudge the state Board of Public Works toward approving a historic land purchase this month. Gov.-elect Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. would be wise to keep it in mind as he contemplates the potential sale or lease of state-owned land in the future. The state's purchase of the 25,000-acre Glatfelter Pulp Wood Co. property on the Eastern shore and in southern Maryland was a win-win deal for the economy and the ecology because it allows logging to continue on most of the parcels, which are spread over seven counties.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2013
Description: Baltimore has a per-person "ecological footprint" that is 13 percent higher than that of the average American, according to a study of local consumption habits led by a researcher at Goucher College. The measure takes into account how large of an area would be needed to accommodate the city's waste and to secure the resources needed to do so. For all of Baltimore, the area is the combined size of West Virginia, Delaware and Rhode Island, the study found. The largest impacts come from traffic and electricity use, according to the research.
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FEATURES
By Mary Gottschalk and Mary Gottschalk,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 26, 1992
Rising and falling hemlines provide fodder for fashion debates, but when it comes to sales it seems more and more manufacturers and retailers are banking on ecology.O Wear is the latest entrant in the ecology-chic arena, joining others such as Earth Age, Wearable Integrity, Ecosport and Esprit's Ecollection, now in its second season. If you already guessed that the "O" in O Wear stands for organic, treat yourself to another piece of Rainforest Crunch nut brittle.The organic cotton pieces for men and women are basic in styling, but offer brighter colors than most of the other ecology-minded lines, which often emphasize the colored cotton, organically grown in shades of brown, green and blue.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | December 18, 2012
With catch limits on Atlantic menhaden being tightened to end overfishing, a new study is getting under way to look at just how many of the little oily fish need to be left in the water to maintain the health of other fish in the Chesapeake Bay and along the East Coast. Under a $320,000 grant from the Lenfest Foundation , fisheries scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science plan to investigate where the balance needs to be struck between fishing for menhaden and preserving them for their value in the ecosystem.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | February 10, 1994
A new cable television channel offering environmental news and entertainment has selected Howard County for its national headquarters.Eric McLamb, an Ellicott City resident who is founder and chief executive officer of the ECOlogy Channel, said he and his partners chose Howard over Atlanta and other areas because of its proximity to Washington and the many environmental organizations and regulatory agencies there.The channel expects to air its first 24-hour broadcast in December. But it faces an uphill climb to get big cable system operators such as Comcast and TCI to offer its program to subscribers, industry analysts say."
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | November 17, 1994
Tele-Communications Inc., the nation's largest cable television company, has begun airing programming from the ECOLOGY Channel, a year-old Ellicott City company that buys and produces programs about nature and the environment.The TCI agreement is the first big break for the fledgling company, co-founded by Eric McLamb, an Ellicott City resident and a former marketing executive with the Discovery Channel in Bethesda."This really sets the stage for us. We knew we had a concept that would fit an emerging interest," said Mr. McLamb.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 22, 1992
Ecology continues to be a key selling point among fashion retailers. Not only is it chic to care about the environment, it's also a nice selling point.Earth Age is among the latest entrants in the ecology-chic category -- and also one of the most attractive. While it's being marketed as a sleepwear line and you'll find it exclusively in Nordstrom's lingerie department now, it's likely you'll also be seeing the T-shirts, jackets and maybe even a unitard on the street.Each piece in the collection is made from cotton that naturally grows in color, resulting in pale tones of green, pink and yellow.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2003
YOU DRIVE to work in the morning and admire a beautiful farm field, the sun coming up across it, and then riding home that afternoon, you pass the same field and see the surveyor's stakes."
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2000
THE TYPICAL environmentalist's dilemma about agriculture and Chesapeake Bay goes like this: Bay restoration can't happen without profound reductions in farm runoff. No effort can be spared to clean up this large pollution source. But your worst enemy is also your best friend. Viable farms are the ultimate defense against sprawl development, whose overall environmental, economic, social and aesthetic impacts far outweigh those of farms. In other words, they hate how you are farming, but they'd hate even more to see you stop.
NEWS
By Michelle Wong and Michelle Wong,SUN STAFF | August 18, 1997
Did you know that while crossing the Bay Bridge you can learn about pollution, wildlife and ecology -- and help keep the kids in the back seat occupied?Well, you can, thanks to the brainchild of Carolyn V. Watson, bay program director for the state Department of Natural Resources.She is the person behind the "Bay Game" sticker books dispensed to children at tollbooths near the bridge. And she is the creator of those big "Did you know?" signs on the eastbound and westbound spans of the bridge.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 29, 2012
In their quest to cure Baltimore's ailing harbor, advocates and authorities have tried one gadget after another: floating wetlands, a solar-powered aerator, even a trash wheel. Add now the "algal turf scrubber," a long wooden sluiceway in which harbor water is pumped over a bed of slimy green algae. The ecological restoration firm Biohabitats and the Living Classrooms Foundation invited news media to see the contraption set up on a former chromium plant site in Fells Point. The gutter, 350 feet long by one foot wide, uses native algae to strip nutrients, suspended sediment and carbon from water and inject oxygen into it before returning it to the harbor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2010
The Contemporary Museum , which has featured provocative works by a broad sampling of cutting-edge artists, announced a new executive director this week who promises to keep things innovative. Sue Spaid doesn't officially start until Dec. 13, but the Pennsylvania-based curator and educator has already planned more than 50 events for the next six months or so and has already sketched out exhibits through 2013. "I'm a Virgo, so I'm big at planning," Spaid, 49, said Wednesday.
TRAVEL
July 18, 2010
Youghiogheny River Festival What: The Youghiogheny River Festival is an annual celebration of the river; proceeds go to local organizations that support the river and its watershed. Events include demonstrations on stream ecology, as well as a nature hike with a Garrett College professor and a dance for universal peace. Where: Friendsville When: July 24 How much: Admission is $7 for adults, $3 for kids ages 6 to 12; children under age 6 are free.
NEWS
By Cindy Ross | May 3, 2010
My fishing buddy, Bob, is against the dam on our local stream being removed. In his mind, the spillway is a waterfall. To his eye, flat water, the wide lake behind the dam, is more aesthetically pleasing than a free-running stream. He does not want a dramatic change; he does not want the landscape altered. Our rivers and streams have become so crowded with dams, many only a few feet high and 100 or more years old, that many people like Bob do not see the toll they have taken on fish populations, wetlands and the overall health of the stream.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
The oil that began washing ashore Friday in Louisiana could devastate one of the richest coastal ecosystems in the country and cripple a major source of the nation's seafood, a top Maryland scientist warns. But Donald F. Boesch, president of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, said a rush to clean up oil smothering sensitive wetlands could risk further damage if not done right. Fish and shellfish, shorebirds and waterfowl, sea turtles and a host of other wildlife are at risk from the more than 200,000 gallons of oil pumping daily out of the ruptured well in the Gulf of Mexico 50 miles off the Louisiana coast.
NEWS
January 24, 2010
This adult education course taught by Chesapeake Bay Foundation staff and other professionals is for those who want an in-depth understanding of the Chesapeake Bay's history, ecology and issues and who want to help restore the bay. Course starts Feb. 18; Easton course starts Feb. 20. Cost is $25. Space is limited. For more information or to download an application form, go to cbf.org/voices.
NEWS
August 14, 2002
Eugene Odum, 88, a former University of Georgia professor who helped advance the science of ecology and the concept of an integrated ecosystem, died Saturday at his Athens, Ga., home.
NEWS
January 24, 2010
This adult education course taught by Chesapeake Bay Foundation staff and other professionals is for those who want an in-depth understanding of the Chesapeake Bay's history, ecology and issues and who want to help restore the bay. Course starts Feb. 18; Easton course starts Feb. 20. Cost is $25. Space is limited. For more information or to download an application form, go to cbf.org/voices.
NEWS
By Katherine Shaver and Katherine Shaver,The Washington Post | January 15, 2010
Prince George's County Council members say officials overseeing construction of the Intercounty Connector are penalizing the county by canceling or changing more of its environmental projects than those in Montgomery County. ICC officials said they plan to cut some previously required environmental projects and to reclassify others because the highway's final design ended up sparing almost a mile more of streams and 30 more acres of wetlands and forests than they had expected, leaving less environmental damage for them to offset.
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