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By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | December 31, 1990
NOT LONG BEFORE Earth Day last year, a conservative think tank issued a warning about radical ecologists who break laws while protesting assaults on the environment.Although the think tank tried to portray the protesters as being as dangerous as John Dillinger, most of the examples they gave amounted to not much more than the kind of vandalism that occurs on Halloween.But in reading the report, I got to the part where the think tank traced the origins of this kind of ecological warfare.And I almost fell out of my chair from laughing.
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By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2013
Leading a tour of the Soldiers Delight area of western Baltimore County on Sunday afternoon, Paula Becker, an ecologist with Maryland's Department of Natural Resources, was pleased to report the first blooming of serpentine chickweed - a plant as rare as it is splashy in spring. And while that might not constitute earth-shattering news, it is certainly reassuring to those monitoring the health of the plant. Serpentine chickweed grows in the shallow serpentine soil of the strange, hilly grasslands of the Soldiers Delight Natural Environment Area, at 2,000 acres the largest remaining ecosystem of its kind in the country.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 21, 1997
The plastic balloons that physicists use to gather information about weather, climate, ozone depletion and cosmic rays may pose a threat to endangered species of whales, an aquatic ecologist at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has warned.Dr. Gerald K. Eddlemon, one of 200 ecologists at the lab in Tennessee, told members of the Ecological Society of America at their meeting last month in Albuquerque, N.M., that he was particularly concerned about the survival of blue whales and right whales.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2012
Ann M. Klingaman, a retired Baltimore County public school educator whose career spanned more than three decades, died Sunday of complications from a broken hip at Gilchrist Hospice in Columbia. The former longtime Catonsville resident was 88. The daughter of a West Baltimore pharmacist and a homemaker, Ann Rebecca Meeth was born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville. She was a 1940 graduate of Catonsville High School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1944 from what was then Western Maryland College.
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By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1999
Three youngsters, including two Shady Side Elementary School pupils, will be tutored in the ecological wonders of the Chesapeake Bay as part of a program sponsored by a south county environmental protection group.As part of its Junior Ecologist Program, designed to educate children about the bay, South Arundel Citizens for Responsible Development (SACReD) is paying for the children -- Shannon Crowner, 9; Darnell Green, 9; and Christina Santiful, 10 -- to attend United Methodist West River Camp at Chalk Point.
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By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1999
Shannon Crowner, 9, was scared of the milky jellyfish in the shallow waters near the shores of the West River. But that didn't stop her from pulling on a pair of rubber waders three times her size and walking in to catch some crabs, shrimp or small fish."
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | March 28, 1991
Millions of acres of wetlands -- from Alaskan tundra to the Eastern Shore's low-lying pine forests -- would be opened to development under proposals now being considered by the Bush administration.The proposals would narrow the definition of what a wetland is and quiet the criticism of developers, foresters and farmers who say that current wetlands laws regulate vast areas in certain regions of the country -- particularly on the Delmarva peninsula and in Louisiana and Alaska.But environmentalists say President Bush will be reneging on his campaign promise to protect those environmentally valuable lands that filter out pollutants and reduce flooding.
NEWS
By William K. Stevens and William K. Stevens,New York Times News Service | January 20, 1993
The majestic image of the lone eagle may often hold true. But scientists are also beginning to piece together a more complex picture of eagles, hawks and falcons as team players whose hunting tactics and cunning intelligence invite comparison with the wolf and the fox.Eagles, in fact, not only mount concerted and successful attacks on the fox itself; they also deceive monkeys, humans' close relatives, in the deadly game of predator versus prey. By acting together, they are even able to bring down big animals like deer, antelopes and African bushbucks.
NEWS
August 7, 1991
During its annual membership drive, representatives of the U.S. Public Interest Research group, the nation's largest environmental and consumer lobby, are focusing on two major pieces of federal environmental legislation that affect public health and environment: the Clean Water Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. According toPIR, U.S. companies use 350 billion pounds of toxic chemicals each year.These chemicals cause cancer, infertility and other diseases.Representatives of PIR will be seeking support by knocking on doors to collect signatures.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | May 9, 2006
Kenneth Tenore, a coastal ecologist who was a proponent of environmental ethics, died of acute pancreatitis Sunday at University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 63 and a resident of Hollywood in St. Mary's County. For the past two decades, until he stepped down last year, Dr. Tenore had been director of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science's Chesapeake Biological Laboratory on Solomons Island. He was an expert on decaying bay grasses and their role in feeding crabs and marine worms.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | March 10, 2009
Robert C. Chance, a pioneering Harford County ecologist and retired high school teacher, received a two-year suspended sentence and was placed on 18 months of supervised probation yesterday for growing marijuana and possessing psychedelic mushrooms last year on his Darlington farm. "This is a 62-year-old man who showed poor judgment," said Baltimore County Circuit Judge John G. Turnbull II as he announced the ruling. "I certainly don't think he's a threat to the community. If anything, he is a threat to himself."
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Kevin Rector,Sun reporter | August 10, 2008
For many, Bob Chance has been the face of ecology in Harford County. He taught earth science during a three-decade run in the public schools - and was named to the school system's Hall of Fame. He promoted recycling long before the government got involved. He wrote a nature column for the local paper, won election to public office, and showed countless youngsters the wonders of the great outdoors as Ranger Bob. And now he is, at 62, a defendant in a drug case. Authorities say he has been growing marijuana at the farm where he raises and sells Christmas trees.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | May 9, 2006
Kenneth Tenore, a coastal ecologist who was a proponent of environmental ethics, died of acute pancreatitis Sunday at University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 63 and a resident of Hollywood in St. Mary's County. For the past two decades, until he stepped down last year, Dr. Tenore had been director of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science's Chesapeake Biological Laboratory on Solomons Island. He was an expert on decaying bay grasses and their role in feeding crabs and marine worms.
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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2005
Charlie Stine splashes through Massey Pond, jabbing his long-handled net into the water like a very impatient crabber. He's wearing waders, and he's up to his hips in water trying to catch predatory fish he thinks prey on his beloved tiger salamanders. A respected ecologist who teaches at the Johns Hopkins University, Stine first found tiger salamanders at this pond in Kent County nearly 50 years ago. He's returned many, many times every year since trying to pry out the secrets of this very elusive creature.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2004
Keith Underwood lightly taps a spindly stem in a ravine near the Magothy River, relieved to find Maryland's last remaining box huckleberry plant is still hanging in there. The Crownsville restoration ecologist is a driving force behind saving and propagating the Ice-Age cultivar, as well as other plants, and creating the environments that could be used to re-establish them. Admittedly passionate about his environmental views and impatient with bureaucracy, he is always ready to start a conservation project, where he blends his beliefs in rebuilding dwindling environments and purifying water bound for the Chesapeake Bay with work, mixing paid and volunteer roles.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2003
A proposal to close Crownsville Hospital Center has Anne Arundel County officials scrambling to study possible uses for the 633-acre site, one of the last expanses of open land in the county. Health Secretary Nelson J. Sabatini recommended selling the mental health facility - and relocating its 200 patients to other facilities - in a report released last week. The move would save the state $5.3 million a year. If Crownsville closes, Anne Arundel County elected leaders, conservationists and nearby homeowners say they want to be included in talks to determine the future of the sprawling property.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2013
Leading a tour of the Soldiers Delight area of western Baltimore County on Sunday afternoon, Paula Becker, an ecologist with Maryland's Department of Natural Resources, was pleased to report the first blooming of serpentine chickweed - a plant as rare as it is splashy in spring. And while that might not constitute earth-shattering news, it is certainly reassuring to those monitoring the health of the plant. Serpentine chickweed grows in the shallow serpentine soil of the strange, hilly grasslands of the Soldiers Delight Natural Environment Area, at 2,000 acres the largest remaining ecosystem of its kind in the country.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 22, 1996
NEW YORK -- The charred trees were still smoldering in late August last year, when a handful of scientists got down on their hands and knees in the heart of the pine barrens in Westhampton to study the regeneration of the pitch pine.This contorted little pine, which has evolved with fire over thousands of years, has serotinous, or resin-sealed, cones that need fire to open and release its seeds.But last year's fire - which swept through 5,500 acres and burned a dozen houses before 2,200 firefighters could bring it under control - was so intense in some places that many dwarf pitch pines burned to a crisp before they could even open their cones.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 24, 2002
NEW YORK - For most of her career, Christine Padoch did her environmental research in the rain forests of Amazonia and Borneo, while Steven Handel studied evolution in the Galapagos Islands. Now Padoch, an ecological anthropologist, takes the subway from her job at the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx to count exotic vegetables at the green markets of Queens, while Handel, a professor of evolutionary biology at Rutgers University, is studying the vegetation that grows along the tracks of the New Jersey transit railway - a true test, if ever there was one, of the survival of the fittest.
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