Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEclipse
IN THE NEWS

Eclipse

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Unlike solar eclipses, lunar eclipses are safe to watch with the naked eye. But clouds or other atmospheric conditions can get in the way of a dramatic view. Look to the western horizon starting at 6:25 a.m. for a chance to see the "blood moon" phenomenon that can occur during full lunar eclipses. Like with brilliant sunrises and sunsets, the reddish hue that the moon can take on depends on dust and other atmospheric conditions. Partial eclipse begins at 5:15 a.m., causing a dimming of one side of the moon.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Unlike solar eclipses, lunar eclipses are safe to watch with the naked eye. But clouds or other atmospheric conditions can get in the way of a dramatic view. Look to the western horizon starting at 6:25 a.m. for a chance to see the "blood moon" phenomenon that can occur during full lunar eclipses. Like with brilliant sunrises and sunsets, the reddish hue that the moon can take on depends on dust and other atmospheric conditions. Partial eclipse begins at 5:15 a.m., causing a dimming of one side of the moon.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
A partial solar eclipse occurred early Sunday morning, most visible over the Atlantic and Africa, but some local photographers captured a brief appearance over Baltimore. Baltimore County residents Tyler Tate and Bryan Bradford observed the sunrise from the roof of the Wyndham Peabody Court Hotel in Mount Vernon, inspired by an iconic set of shots by Baltimore Sun photographer Aubrey Bodine. Tate explains: "The image is actually composed of two photographs:  the first is an unfiltered snapshot of Mount Vernon Place and beyond, taken seconds before sunrise.  Next, we used a Hoya NDX400 filter on so that we could capture a clear snapshot of the eclipsed sun during sunrise itself, at about 6:37 AM +/-.  The two photographs were stacked in photoshop.  The camera was a Canon Digital Rebel T3i.  (The NDX400 was sufficient for photograph use but should never be used to observe the sun directly)
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
A full lunar eclipse will occur during the Full Hunter's Moon, creating a spectacle that may make the moon appear in a rusty hue early Wednesday morning. The moon will be full at 6:51 a.m. Wednesday, so it will be shining big and bright Tuesday night, though it won't be technically full yet. Just about half an hour before that, the peak of a lunar eclipse will begin. "Totality" of lunar eclipse starts at 6:25 a.m., falling just before sunrise on the East Coast. The moon will be passing within the Earth's shadow.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
Skywatchers in Maryland and across the Northeast will get a glimpse of a partial lunar eclipse tonight as the Full Harvest Moon rises. It will be most visible at about 7:50 p.m., which is just 12 minutes after the moon reaches its "full" stage, at 7:38 p.m. The moon will actually spend about 4 hours partially behind the edge of Earth's shadow. To see the eclipse, you can look directly at the moon, unlike in a solar eclipse. But this one could be difficult to see because it's only a partial eclipse.
NEWS
By Carol Arscott | August 21, 1991
ON JULY 30, I lost my virginity. For the first time in a dozen years of political activism, I was tossed out of a public meeting that suddenly turned private. I finally know firsthand just how it feels to be told that my presence at a gathering of an officially created public body will not be tolerated. It feels lousy.Central Committee.
FEATURES
July 9, 1991
The sun will be in total eclipse Thursday, a fairly rare astronomical event that awed and frightened mankind for ages and still holds a kind of mystic power over the imagination.Thousands are traveling to the Pacific to see the event. Many more will watch on TV. Some think the eclipse will bring them new creative powers, change their fortunes or in other ways affect their lives.How about you, are you a part of the eclipse fever? Do you think the event, which astronomers can easily explain scientifically, holds any mystic power?
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
Parts of Australia and Pacific islands are in for what some call a "ring of fire" eclipse on Friday, though it won't be visible on this side of the world. The moon will pass between Earth and the sun, blocking all but the outer ring of the sun's rays for those in the center of the eclipse's path. Further north or south, the moon will obscure less of the sun. Because the moon is relatively far away from Earth in its orbit, it won't block the sun entirely, what is known as a total solar eclipse.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
Rain, storms and clouds are forecast Monday night through Tuesday, likely blocking out any view of a full lunar eclipse -- sometimes known as a "Blood Moon" -- occurring early Tuesday morning. Clouds are forecast to move in Tuesday afternoon, with chances of showers starting late Monday night or early Tuesday morning. The eclipse will start about 2 a.m., reaching full eclipse from 3 a.m. to 4:25 a.m., with a peak at 3:46 a.m. The eclipse occurs when the full moon passes through Earth's shadow, opposite the sun, and the sun, moon and Earth happen to be on the same plane.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
A full lunar eclipse will occur early Tuesday morning, darkening the full moon and possibly tinting it a reddish hue that causes some to call it a "Blood Moon". For nearly an hour and a half, the moon will be dimmed and possibly appearing a copper color because of sunlight bent by the atmosphere. The total eclipse begins around 3 a.m. and ends around 4:30 a.m., with the moon at its dimmest at 3:46 a.m. The eclipse will be visible across the Americas as well as throughout the Pacific.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
Rain, storms and clouds are forecast Monday night through Tuesday, likely blocking out any view of a full lunar eclipse -- sometimes known as a "Blood Moon" -- occurring early Tuesday morning. Clouds are forecast to move in Tuesday afternoon, with chances of showers starting late Monday night or early Tuesday morning. The eclipse will start about 2 a.m., reaching full eclipse from 3 a.m. to 4:25 a.m., with a peak at 3:46 a.m. The eclipse occurs when the full moon passes through Earth's shadow, opposite the sun, and the sun, moon and Earth happen to be on the same plane.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
A full lunar eclipse will occur early Tuesday morning, darkening the full moon and possibly tinting it a reddish hue that causes some to call it a "Blood Moon". For nearly an hour and a half, the moon will be dimmed and possibly appearing a copper color because of sunlight bent by the atmosphere. The total eclipse begins around 3 a.m. and ends around 4:30 a.m., with the moon at its dimmest at 3:46 a.m. The eclipse will be visible across the Americas as well as throughout the Pacific.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | January 23, 2014
Thomas Voss, a top trainer of steeplechase and flat race horses, died suddenly at his Monkton farm on Tuesday. His family confirmed the death of Mr. Voss, who was 63. The cause was an apparent heart attack. "This is a great loss. We are all just stunned," said Maryanna Skowronski, a longtime friend of the Voss family, who is director of the Historical Society of Harford County. Though Mr. Voss trained both flat and steeplechase runners, his greatest success was with the latter.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | January 21, 2014
The 2014 Civil Rights Game will be played between the Houston Astros and the Orioles at Minute Maid Park on May 30, Major League Baseball announced Monday. The Civil Rights Game events pay tribute to those who fought on and off the field for equal rights for all Americans. Maya Angelou , Berry Gordy and Jim Brown will be honored at the MLB Beacon Awards Luncheon during the game. Horse racing Carrasco winless in first journeyman outing Victor Carrasco rode as a journeyman for the first time Monday at Laurel Park, going winless with six mounts but finishing in the money three times.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | January 19, 2014
Victor Carrasco became the 10th Maryland-based rider to earn the Eclipse Award for outstanding apprentice Saturday night. He received 172 first-place votes. Edgard Zayas was second with 18, followed by the third finalist, Manuel Franco, with 13. The 21-year-old ended the year as the leading apprentice in North America in both wins (215) and earnings ($4,357,715). From Nov. 13 through Dec. 31, he rode at least one winner in 24 of the 28 live racing days at Laurel Park, including 16 multiple-win afternoons.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | January 9, 2014
Horse racing Carrasco, Dance to Bristol are finalists for Eclipse Awards Victor Carrasco was named a finalist for outstanding apprentice jockey when the 2013 Eclipse Awards nominees were announced Wednesday. Dance to Bristol, based at the Bowie Training Center, is a finalist in the female sprinter category. Winners will be announced Jan. 18. Carrasco led apprentice riders in victories (215) and earnings ($4,357,715) last year. Edgard Zayas (183 wins and $3,512,381 as an apprentice)
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
A full lunar eclipse will occur during the Full Hunter's Moon, creating a spectacle that may make the moon appear in a rusty hue early Wednesday morning. The moon will be full at 6:51 a.m. Wednesday, so it will be shining big and bright Tuesday night, though it won't be technically full yet. Just about half an hour before that, the peak of a lunar eclipse will begin. "Totality" of lunar eclipse starts at 6:25 a.m., falling just before sunrise on the East Coast. The moon will be passing within the Earth's shadow.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | July 15, 1991
ECLIPSE TAPE (abridged) from Baja California: "It's July 11, 1991, the day we've waited for, total eclipse of the century. We're lucky, sunny, no clouds . . . I'm shaking a bit, didn't sleep . . . Nearing 10:25 a.m., beach neighbor cries, 'First contact!' (it actually happened at 10:24:24, predicted by ancients back in 648 B.C.) . . . Looking skyward through welder's goggles, I see black moon taking first bite from top of sun . . . Bite deepens, sun's crescent narrows . . . Colder at 11 a.m., temperature at 82 degrees, down from 102 in 30 minutes as moon partly blocks sun's rays . . . Glad I'm not alone, fun sharing this experience . . . Crowds peering up through telescopes, long-lensed cameras, reflectors . . . Two twittering birds, confused, flutter and dart wildly along shore; they think it's bedtime, but why at noon?"
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2013
Unique celestial events in 2014 include two full lunar eclipses visible from Maryland and a partial solar eclipse that will begin just before sunset one October afternoon. A new meteor shower could be a bonus. Here's what stargazers have to look forward to next year: January Jupiter is always one of the most distinctive objects in the night sky, and it will be at its brightest early in the new year, on Jan. 5. That is when the planet is at “opposition,” when the Earth is directly between it and the sun. The Quadrantid meteors, meanwhile, also peak early in the year, on the night of Jan. 2 and into Jan. 3 for a matter of hours.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
A partial solar eclipse occurred early Sunday morning, most visible over the Atlantic and Africa, but some local photographers captured a brief appearance over Baltimore. Baltimore County residents Tyler Tate and Bryan Bradford observed the sunrise from the roof of the Wyndham Peabody Court Hotel in Mount Vernon, inspired by an iconic set of shots by Baltimore Sun photographer Aubrey Bodine. Tate explains: "The image is actually composed of two photographs:  the first is an unfiltered snapshot of Mount Vernon Place and beyond, taken seconds before sunrise.  Next, we used a Hoya NDX400 filter on so that we could capture a clear snapshot of the eclipsed sun during sunrise itself, at about 6:37 AM +/-.  The two photographs were stacked in photoshop.  The camera was a Canon Digital Rebel T3i.  (The NDX400 was sufficient for photograph use but should never be used to observe the sun directly)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.