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Eckstein

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NEWS
May 3, 2003
On May 2, 2003, ELAINE J. (nee Nello), beloved wife of the late Charles H. Eckstein, devoted mother of Charles Eckstein and his wife Barbara, Kenneth Eckstein and his wife Diane, Charlaine and Brian Eckstein. Loving sister of Charles Cook. Dear grandmother of Douglas Eckstein, Karen and Justin Whitt and Christina Eckstein. Great grandmother of Emiley Crabb and Sumer Whitt. Friends may call at the CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF DUNDALK, P.A., 7110 Sollers Point Road on Sunday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. where Services will be held on Sunday at 8 P.M. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the American Cancer Society.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2012
Milton Lee Eckstein Jr., a retired grocery store manager and fast-pitch softball player, died of complications from cancer Saturday at his Inwood, W.Va., home. He was 84 and had lived in Joppa. Born in Rosedale, he attended Kenwood High School. He worked at A&P grocery stores for 27 years, including one on Sinclair Lane, where he was manager. He later became head of maintenance for Maryland General Hospital. He also owned a business, E&M Home Improvement. In 1984, he was inducted into the Maryland Fastpitch Hall of Fame.
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NEWS
December 31, 2002
John H. Eckstein Jr., a retired assistant supervisor for the Maryland Department of Assessments and Taxation and a World War II veteran, died of a heart attack Friday at his Catonsville home. He was 78. Born and raised in Baltimore, Mr. Eckstein graduated from Southern High School in 1943. He was soon drafted into the Army and saw action in the South Pacific with an engineering company. After his return home, he attended the University of Baltimore and in 1950 earned a degree in accounting.
NEWS
May 21, 2009
Chevra Ahavas Chesed Inc. deeply regrets to announce the passing of our beloved Member Ida G. Eckstein
SPORTS
By From Sun News Services | September 1, 2008
The Arizona Diamondbacks made a trade to get utility infielder David Eckstein from the Toronto Blue Jays in exchange for a minor league pitcher. The deal, made just before the deadline for playoff eligibility, gives the National League West-leading Diamondbacks a late-season spark plug with impressive October credentials. "I'm definitely very excited with the opportunity to go out there and make the postseason," Eckstein, 33, said. The 2006 World Series Most Valuable Player with the St. Louis Cardinals, Eckstein batted .277 with a homer and 23 RBIs in a part-time role for Toronto.
NEWS
December 7, 2007
On December 3, 2007, ANNA B. MARAHRENS (nee Brown) beloved wife of the late Henry W. Marahrens; loving mother of the late Diane R. Marahrens; dear sister of the late Bertha B. Shaw and William Marahrens; cherished aunt of Sandra Eckstein and her husband Mark and great aunt of Kristine Eckstein. An interment will be held at Woodlawn Cemetery on Saturday 10 A.M. Arrangements by Leonard J. Ruck Funeral Home.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2005
Every Thursday night, two hours before sundown, disc golf players swarm through the course in Druid Hill Park. In groups of three, they travel from one pole to the next, attempting to toss their disc in the perfect arc that will land it in a basket affixed to the pole. Disc golf is similar to traditional golf in that there are 18 poles and the object is to get the disc into the basket with as few throws as possible. The obstacles on the course -- trees and hills -- take the place of sand traps.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 31, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In what may have been the grand finale of the Senate's campaign fund-raising hearings, Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt denied yesterday that he was pressured by the White House in 1995 to reject an Indian casino proposal that had been opposed by big Democratic donors.But Babbitt acknowledged that in a conversation with a lawyer for the rejected Indian tribes, he "probably" said that Harold Ickes, then a deputy White House chief of staff, had wanted or expected a decision. Babbitt said that he used Ickes' name merely to get the lawyer, Paul F. Eckstein, out of his office and that in reality he had not talked with Ickes.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | August 1, 1992
On a cool, fresh evening in Druid Hill Park, plastic disks fly toward their targets as fast and straight as inspired thoughts. On the ground below, spread neatly across the park's nine-acre course, groups of disk golfers form a pleasant tableau of summer.In the foreground, Steve Alpern and his wife, Carolyn Williams, instruct their sons Jenner, almost 5, and Wils, almost 2, in the basic throws of the game. Several hundred yards away, two tall, rangy fellows with free-form hair and wire-rimmed glasses tee off. In the distance, Norm Eckstein, course pro, strides across the grass, pulling a disk golf cart.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun reporter | March 18, 2007
Jupiter, Fla.-- --An outfielder with no chance of making the St. Louis Cardinals' roster skips a throw past home plate during a routine drill, and the graying man in the pristine No. 10 uniform bolts upright and screams. "Hey, make him do it again," he bellows. It's only spring training, it's only practice. Nonetheless, Tony La Russa is unsettled. He paces around the diamond at Roger Dean Stadium, getting up-close looks at how his players are executing drills. The Cardinals' venerable manager, in what could be his final season, isn't letting up now that he has that elusive second World Series title.
SPORTS
By From Sun News Services | September 1, 2008
The Arizona Diamondbacks made a trade to get utility infielder David Eckstein from the Toronto Blue Jays in exchange for a minor league pitcher. The deal, made just before the deadline for playoff eligibility, gives the National League West-leading Diamondbacks a late-season spark plug with impressive October credentials. "I'm definitely very excited with the opportunity to go out there and make the postseason," Eckstein, 33, said. The 2006 World Series Most Valuable Player with the St. Louis Cardinals, Eckstein batted .277 with a homer and 23 RBIs in a part-time role for Toronto.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Roch Kubatko and Jeff Zrebiec and Roch Kubatko,SUN REPORTERS | July 4, 2008
Seeking to fill what has become the team's most glaring deficiency, the Orioles have engaged in talks with the Toronto Blue Jays regarding shortstop David Eckstein, according to industry sources. Eckstein, 33, is hitting .273 with one home run and 18 RBIs in 198 at-bats. However, he has become expendable on a roster that includes infielders Marco Scutaro, John McDonald and Joe Inglett, who has seen his role increase with regular second baseman Aaron Hill injured. Because of the glut of middle infielders, the Blue Jays' asking price for Eckstein isn't expected to be too high.
NEWS
December 7, 2007
On December 3, 2007, ANNA B. MARAHRENS (nee Brown) beloved wife of the late Henry W. Marahrens; loving mother of the late Diane R. Marahrens; dear sister of the late Bertha B. Shaw and William Marahrens; cherished aunt of Sandra Eckstein and her husband Mark and great aunt of Kristine Eckstein. An interment will be held at Woodlawn Cemetery on Saturday 10 A.M. Arrangements by Leonard J. Ruck Funeral Home.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun reporter | March 18, 2007
Jupiter, Fla.-- --An outfielder with no chance of making the St. Louis Cardinals' roster skips a throw past home plate during a routine drill, and the graying man in the pristine No. 10 uniform bolts upright and screams. "Hey, make him do it again," he bellows. It's only spring training, it's only practice. Nonetheless, Tony La Russa is unsettled. He paces around the diamond at Roger Dean Stadium, getting up-close looks at how his players are executing drills. The Cardinals' venerable manager, in what could be his final season, isn't letting up now that he has that elusive second World Series title.
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY | March 22, 2006
The inaugural World Baseball Classic is over, and one can presume that the flag-waving, sign-holding Japanese fan base has finally strolled giddily away from San Diego's Petco Park wearing smiles and plenty of official Classic merchandise. So now that it is done, what has the Classic - the 16-team international tournament dreamed up by baseball commissioner Bud Selig and plunked down in the middle of spring training - taught us? Well, most obviously, Americans aren't as openly passionate about the sport - or at least this preconceived version - as those in baseball-crazy outposts around the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2005
Every Thursday night, two hours before sundown, disc golf players swarm through the course in Druid Hill Park. In groups of three, they travel from one pole to the next, attempting to toss their disc in the perfect arc that will land it in a basket affixed to the pole. Disc golf is similar to traditional golf in that there are 18 poles and the object is to get the disc into the basket with as few throws as possible. The obstacles on the course -- trees and hills -- take the place of sand traps.
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