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By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2012
It's hard to keep Nelson Emokpae down. The Baltimore singer/songwriter, who leads the band Nelly's Echo, is perpetually upbeat — both in person and in song. A Nigerian native, Emokpae has lived in Baltimore for the past several years, writing sunny music and gigging around the country, mainly at colleges. (Saturday, he performs at Boordy Vineyards.) After releasing two albums, Emokpae decided to take his time with the third. Instead of rushing into a recording studio, he has spent the past several months tinkering with the songs and arrangements, and he doesn't yet have a release date — or a definitive title — for the new album.
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NEWS
June 4, 2014
Sadly, commentator Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. repeats the babble of religious conservatives who claim that the "free exercise" of religion includes the right to impose their own religion on everyone else at government meetings or other government-sponsored institutions, including public school classrooms ( "Freedom of, not from, religion," June 1). The repetition of religious formulas of prayer or even extemporaneous forms of prayer as part of a public event is an imposition of religion at that event.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | February 8, 2007
Hometown -- Baltimore Current members --Nelson Emokpae Founded in --2004 Style --acoustic soul Influenced by --Motown, ABBA, Boyz to Men, Luther Vandross, Norah Jones Notable --Emokpae has yet to release a debut CD because, he said, he's a perfectionist. His first album must perfectly re-create the sound he hears in his head, he said. Until he finds the right people to record him properly, he'll keep using rough-made demos, he said. Quotable --"`Nelly' is myself, and whenever I sing or perform it's usually the reaction of the crowd I base my performance on. Whatever they `echo' back.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | June 3, 2014
I spent several days in New York last week with students from around the country who were preparing to head into the heartland to help organize Walmart workers for better jobs and wages. (Full familial disclosure: My son Adam is one of the leaders.) Almost exactly 50 years ago, a similar group headed to Mississippi to register African-Americans to vote, in what came to be known as Freedom Summer. Call this Freedom Summer II. The current struggle of low-wage workers across America echoes the civil rights struggle of the 1960s.
TRAVEL
By Sandy Wieber and Sandy Wieber,Special to the Sun | July 4, 1999
I was fresh out of high school and in France on the Fourth of July 1985. I was touring Europe with a group of other graduates. We were singing our way through historic cathedrals, parks and town squares, performing in a crooked path from Stuttgart, Germany, to London in the summer. But on that day -- Independence Day -- we were homesick. We wanted to go to a picnic, to watch fireworks, to celebrate something together as a group. Even in the midst of the crowds of Paris, we felt a little lonely and uprooted.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,Staff Writer | August 25, 1993
The Housing Authority of Baltimore City expanded its maintenance and security sweeps beyond Flag House Courts yesterday, tackling another public housing complex, Lafayette Courts in East Baltimore.For the fourth time in two months, about 350 maintenance workers, counselors and police were dispatched to a Housing Authority high-rise as part of the Extraordinary Comprehensive Housekeeping Operation (ECHO). Yesterday, they converged on an 11-story building at 125 N. Colvin St. in Lafayette Courts, the city's oldest public housing complex.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 13, 1999
To Americans, there is no personality trait more noble or admirable than rugged individualism.Other cultures may prize conformity and warn that the nail that sticks out gets hammered down, but here in the U.S. of A., we value those who march to the beat of a different drummer. We see the ability to stand one's ground as a true test of moral fiber.Tom Petty is a case in point. Not only has he maintained a remarkably unique voice as a musician, resisting the tides of fashion and answering only to his own muse, but he takes an equally uncompromising stance toward the business side of rock and roll.
SPORTS
August 23, 1997
Today: Believe I Wood, unbeaten in two starts at Laurel, heads the field in the fourth running of the Bobby Hale Stakes, the opening-day feature at Timonium Race Course.Ten 2-year-old colts and geldings passed the entry box for the 6 1/2 -furlong event, which carries a $30,000 purse.Serious challenges are expected from Enchanted Ghost, a son of Silver Ghost, who won his debut at Laurel earlier this month. Wild Explo, who returned with an excuse in the Primer Stakes, should also be respected in the wagering.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | May 26, 1995
Mounted on the back wall of the set for Fell's Point Corner Theatre's production of "Eleemosynary" are two white, fabric-covered trapezoidal shapes. They turn out to be wings, created by an eccentric character named Dorothea, who is convinced that man can fly."The secret of flight lies in the assurance that we are worthy of flying," Dorothea says. Heavily weighted with metaphor, it's a typical line in Lee Blessing's feminist play about three generations of women in an intellectually gifted but emotionally challenged family.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2000
Tiny Echo organizer can get in sync with PC applications Oregon Scientific has packed a lot into a very small package with the Echo personal digital assistant. The $79.95 Echo is billed as the smallest synchronizable PDA. About the length and width of a business card and a mere quarter-inch thick, the Echo weighs less than 2 ounces. Its size may draw users in, but its features will keep them happy. The Echo comes with a PC docking cradle and Companion Link software to synchronize data with Microsoft Outlook, Act!
NEWS
March 6, 2014
In 1938, Adolph Hitler wanted to annex that portion of Czechoslovakia that bordered on Germany known as the Sudetenland which had a large German ethnic minority but which, much more importantly, contained the extremely strong border defenses of the Czech Army. Hitler infiltrated Nazi agitators into the Sudetenland who created conditions wherein Hitler could claim he had to militarily occupy that portion of Czechoslovakia in order to protect ethnic Germans. Hitler then met with Italy's Benito Mussolini and British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain at Munich and promised in writing that if they would concur in this annexation he, Hitler, had no more territorial ambitions in Europe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
A couple of hard-edged veteran cops are driving down a desolate Louisiana road after investigating a grisly crime scene in HBO's new Sunday-night drama, “True Detective.” They have been partners for three months but have spoken little about their personal lives. “Ask you something?” the older detective (Woody Harrelson) says. “You a Christian, yeah?” “No,” his partner (Matthew McConaughey) replies, looking out the passenger-side window at the barren landscape.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2013
At the 11th hour on Nov. 11, 1918, "the monstrous anger of the guns" and "the stuttering rifles' rapid rattle" - to quote two of poet Wilfred Owen's indelible phrases - finally subsided. The First World War, the one to end all wars, was over. The silence probably would not have impressed Owen, a lieutenant in the British army. He had already written about the way soldiers "walked quite friendly up to Death" and "laughed, knowing that better men would come, and greater wars. " The poet, killed by a sniper a week before the Armistice at the age of 25, left behind a collection of searing verses that would become integral to Benjamin Britten's "War Requiem," a 1962 score that combines Owen's words with the text of the Latin Mass for the Dead.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | October 31, 2013
Observing Washington politics close-up has given me a new appreciation of Shakespeare. Now I see where he got his ideas. "Today, you could say that almost all of our political rhetoric, comes from two books from the 16th and 17th centuries: the King James Bible and Shakespeare's plays," Michael Witmore, director of Folger Shakespeare Library, told me last year. I recently talked to Mr. Witmore again at the 71-year-old independent research library and theater, which sits only a block east of the Capitol.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
Subscribers and friends of Compass Rose Theater Company had major cause for celebration last month with the opening of the troupe's new theater home in the Annapolis Arts District. The redeveloped 2,900-square-foot space at 49 Spa Road now has a full lobby, classroom, library and a large backstage area for performers and dressing rooms, with a ceiling height of 25 feet and a 10-by-25-foot stage. Designed by Severna Park-based theater architect Gary Martinez, the theater comfortably seats 70. Martinez described it as "a dynamic space for a dynamic company," and Lucinda Merry-Browne, founder and artistic director of Compass Rose, called the theater "the realization of the dream of a lifetime.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | April 11, 2013
Forty-one years ago, Maryland Gov. Marvin Mandel pulled off a series of staggering triumphs that The Sun compared to winning the Triple Crown: Maryland's first gun-control law; a unique, state-run auto insurance agency; and a higher gasoline tax to support Baltimore's first rapid rail line. He achieved this in the face of ferocious opposition from the National Rifle Association and the insurance and trucking industries. It took Mr. Mandel's enormous persuasive skills - including arm-twisting and deal-making - to win those monumental battles.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,Staff Writer | July 21, 1993
Municipal and Housing Authority workers and police swept through another East Baltimore public housing high-rise building yesterday in an effort to rid the residence of grime and crime.Wearing white hard hats, about 350 workers from 10 city agencies descended on the 12-story building at 26 S. Exeter St. at 9 a.m. and started hammering, sawing, painting and landscaping the grounds under the Extraordinary Comprehensive Housekeeping Operation, or ECHO.The Housing Authority of Baltimore City has now conducted ECHO sweeps at all three high-rise buildings at the Flag House Courts public housing complex at a cost of $200,000 for each sweep.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
Subscribers and friends of Compass Rose Theater Company had major cause for celebration last month with the opening of the troupe's new theater home in the Annapolis Arts District. The redeveloped 2,900-square-foot space at 49 Spa Road now has a full lobby, classroom, library and a large backstage area for performers and dressing rooms, with a ceiling height of 25 feet and a 10-by-25-foot stage. Designed by Severna Park-based theater architect Gary Martinez, the theater comfortably seats 70. Martinez described it as "a dynamic space for a dynamic company," and Lucinda Merry-Browne, founder and artistic director of Compass Rose, called the theater "the realization of the dream of a lifetime.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
For more than a decade, Priscilla Lollar struggled to face the realization that her son had been killed in a brawl outside an Atlanta nightclub. But these days, her emotions are raw again, as one of the men charged in the slaying - Baltimore Ravens star Ray Lewis - attracts national attention for his impending retirement and the team's playoff run. The brawl in the early morning hours of Jan. 31, 2000, left two young men from Akron, Ohio, dead...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sara Toth | October 9, 2012
Baltimore's Nelly's Echo made his second - and unfortunately last - appearance on NBC's “The Voice” Monday night, as contestants entered into the battle rounds and some, sadly, went home. TEAM CHRISTINA   Nelly's Echo - Nelson Emokpae, for us local fans - was pitted against Chicago's De'Borah, and NBC has garnered my wrath for unfairly pairing MY TWO FAVORITES AND FORCING ONE OF THEM TO LEAVE. Coach Christina Aguilera had the two taking on The Police's “Message in a Bottle,” and frankly, during rehearsals, De'Borah was a mess, while Nelson seemingly had the win already in hand.
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