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Echinacea

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By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | March 18, 2001
Q. I have been taking Echinacea with goldenseal every day since the beginning of fall. It works great. My husband has had four terrible colds since fall, and I haven't caught any of them. I have been hearing, however, that it is not good to continue taking Echinacea over a long period of time. I was told to wait until I think I might be getting a cold and then take it for a week to 10 days. It seems silly to me to wait until you get sick to start taking Echinacea, but I don't want to damage my body.
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NEWS
By Sindya N. Bhanoo and Sindya N. Bhanoo,SUN REPORTER | June 25, 2007
America's on-again, off-again romance with echinacea could be on again. The popular herbal supplement, made from the purple coneflower, might reduce the chances of catching a cold by 58 percent, according to the latest in a long line of confusing and contradictory studies. Better yet, echinacea might reduce the length of a cold by an average of 1.4 days -- a substantial savings, because colds cause 40 percent of the nation's lost work time, the authors of a recent study say. The study, conducted by scientists from the University of Connecticut, is published online today in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, a British medical journal.
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NEWS
By Sindya N. Bhanoo and Sindya N. Bhanoo,SUN REPORTER | June 25, 2007
America's on-again, off-again romance with echinacea could be on again. The popular herbal supplement, made from the purple coneflower, might reduce the chances of catching a cold by 58 percent, according to the latest in a long line of confusing and contradictory studies. Better yet, echinacea might reduce the length of a cold by an average of 1.4 days -- a substantial savings, because colds cause 40 percent of the nation's lost work time, the authors of a recent study say. The study, conducted by scientists from the University of Connecticut, is published online today in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, a British medical journal.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | June 2, 2006
Americans spend an estimated $20 billion a year on dietary supplements and "natural" remedies. Many of us are blissfully - even willfully - ignorant of the medicinal value, or lack thereof, in these products. It's not entirely our fault that we buy this stuff so blindly. In 1994, Congress limited the power of the Food and Drug Administration to regulate supplements and herbal medicines, which are allowed to get - and stay - on the market unless clear evidence of harm is found. We have been left largely to our own devices to figure out which alternative remedies work, and are safe, and which are pure snake oil. Happily, a few reasonably trustworthy Web sites have sprung up enabling consumers to evaluate how much credible research there is (or isn't)
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 28, 2005
Echinacea, an herbal remedy popular for fighting the common cold, does not ward off runny noses, sore throats or headaches, nor does it help speed recovery from cold symptoms, according to the results of a broad clinical trial to be reported today in the New England Journal of Medicine. Taken with other recent studies that showed no benefit from echinacea, the new findings shift the burden of proof to proponents of herbal products to demonstrate that the plant has medicinal value, researchers said.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | July 25, 2004
Echinacea, a North American native perennial, has long been a medicinal herb. Plains Indian tribes used the roots and rhizomes of Echinacea angustifolia, and today many of us swear by Echinacea tea or tablets to ward off colds and strengthen immune systems. But while the benefits of Echinacea, or purple coneflower, are near-legendary, there's another reason to grow the plant: It's gorgeous. With big, daisy-like petals spoked around a bulbous hub of gold-tipped bronze quills, it adds a beautiful wildflower look to the perennial beds.
FEATURES
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,BOSTON GLOBE | April 15, 1997
The Cheyenne used it for sore gums, the Comanches, for toothaches and sore throats. Other Native Americans kept it on hand for snakebites or syphilis.Modern Americans seem to love the stuff, too, even if we can't pronounce it. In fact, echinacea -- that's eck-in-EH-shia -- is now the top selling herbal remedy in health food stores, though garlic and ginseng claim top honors in overall sales.Unlike many medicinal herbs, this daisy-like flower, also known as purple coneflower, quite literally has its roots in America, not Asia.
NEWS
By Mary Beth Regan and Mary Beth Regan,Special to the Sun | January 25, 2004
Long before the first apothecary opened in this country, Native Americans knew the secret of crushing a common purple flower, called echinacea, to treat everything from snakebites to stuffy noses. Today millions of Americans turn to natural remedies, from echinacea to Vitamin C to elderberry, to treat winter ailments such as the cold or flu. In 2002, for example, consumers spent roughly $800 million on these products to boost their immune systems and to treat illnesses, according to the Nutrition Business Journal, which tracks the industry.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | June 2, 2006
Americans spend an estimated $20 billion a year on dietary supplements and "natural" remedies. Many of us are blissfully - even willfully - ignorant of the medicinal value, or lack thereof, in these products. It's not entirely our fault that we buy this stuff so blindly. In 1994, Congress limited the power of the Food and Drug Administration to regulate supplements and herbal medicines, which are allowed to get - and stay - on the market unless clear evidence of harm is found. We have been left largely to our own devices to figure out which alternative remedies work, and are safe, and which are pure snake oil. Happily, a few reasonably trustworthy Web sites have sprung up enabling consumers to evaluate how much credible research there is (or isn't)
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 30, 2001
A LINTHICUM WOMAN is Crow of the Year for the Chesapeake Bay Roost of the Association of Old Crows. The Association of Old Crows, a professional association of electronics experts from the government, the military and the defense industry with high security clearances, recognized Betty McCarty for representing the Chesapeake chapter at national functions and working with the collection of artifacts at the Historical Electronics Museum in Linthicum....
NEWS
December 23, 2005
You recently had a question from someone who didn't take any prescription drugs. He wanted to know if he should sign up for Medicare Plan D. Your advice was abysmal. You discouraged him by writing, "paying a monthly premium for years could add up." This applies to any insurance. I am advising my pharmacy customers to treat Medicare D like insurance and sign up now rather than later. Those who take prescriptions should choose a plan that covers more of their drugs rather than the cheapest one. We goofed.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 28, 2005
Echinacea, an herbal remedy popular for fighting the common cold, does not ward off runny noses, sore throats or headaches, nor does it help speed recovery from cold symptoms, according to the results of a broad clinical trial to be reported today in the New England Journal of Medicine. Taken with other recent studies that showed no benefit from echinacea, the new findings shift the burden of proof to proponents of herbal products to demonstrate that the plant has medicinal value, researchers said.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | July 25, 2004
Echinacea, a North American native perennial, has long been a medicinal herb. Plains Indian tribes used the roots and rhizomes of Echinacea angustifolia, and today many of us swear by Echinacea tea or tablets to ward off colds and strengthen immune systems. But while the benefits of Echinacea, or purple coneflower, are near-legendary, there's another reason to grow the plant: It's gorgeous. With big, daisy-like petals spoked around a bulbous hub of gold-tipped bronze quills, it adds a beautiful wildflower look to the perennial beds.
NEWS
By Mary Beth Regan and Mary Beth Regan,Special to the Sun | January 25, 2004
Long before the first apothecary opened in this country, Native Americans knew the secret of crushing a common purple flower, called echinacea, to treat everything from snakebites to stuffy noses. Today millions of Americans turn to natural remedies, from echinacea to Vitamin C to elderberry, to treat winter ailments such as the cold or flu. In 2002, for example, consumers spent roughly $800 million on these products to boost their immune systems and to treat illnesses, according to the Nutrition Business Journal, which tracks the industry.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 30, 2001
A LINTHICUM WOMAN is Crow of the Year for the Chesapeake Bay Roost of the Association of Old Crows. The Association of Old Crows, a professional association of electronics experts from the government, the military and the defense industry with high security clearances, recognized Betty McCarty for representing the Chesapeake chapter at national functions and working with the collection of artifacts at the Historical Electronics Museum in Linthicum....
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | March 18, 2001
Q. I have been taking Echinacea with goldenseal every day since the beginning of fall. It works great. My husband has had four terrible colds since fall, and I haven't caught any of them. I have been hearing, however, that it is not good to continue taking Echinacea over a long period of time. I was told to wait until I think I might be getting a cold and then take it for a week to 10 days. It seems silly to me to wait until you get sick to start taking Echinacea, but I don't want to damage my body.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun | March 14, 1999
Q. I read your column on the effect that coconut macaroons might have on Crohn's disease. Having suffered with this dread disease for years, I bought four boxes of Archway cookies. Much to my shock, there has been dramatic improvement in my diarrhea in less than a week.I am on prednisone, which has horrible side effects. My gastroenterologist pooh-poohed this new remedy, but the macaroons have given me far more relief than any medication I have taken.It is still too early to tell if this improvement is a temporary blip on the radar screen, but it is the first optimism that I have had in years!
NEWS
By Jane E. Allen and Jane E. Allen,Los Angeles Times | January 10, 1999
You might think doctors and nurses have discovered some secret formula for fighting the misery-inducing common cold. Turns out, the classic prescriptions of rest, fluids and an over-the-counter pain reliever and fever-reducer like aspirin, acetaminophen or ibuprofen topped medical staffers' personal choices in a survey of 43 medical workers by Dr. Kathi J. Kemper of Children's Hospital in Boston.Other findings:* 81 percent used some cold medication; 60 percent favored fever reducers, while a third used decongestants.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun | March 14, 1999
Q. I read your column on the effect that coconut macaroons might have on Crohn's disease. Having suffered with this dread disease for years, I bought four boxes of Archway cookies. Much to my shock, there has been dramatic improvement in my diarrhea in less than a week.I am on prednisone, which has horrible side effects. My gastroenterologist pooh-poohed this new remedy, but the macaroons have given me far more relief than any medication I have taken.It is still too early to tell if this improvement is a temporary blip on the radar screen, but it is the first optimism that I have had in years!
NEWS
By Jane E. Allen and Jane E. Allen,Los Angeles Times | January 10, 1999
You might think doctors and nurses have discovered some secret formula for fighting the misery-inducing common cold. Turns out, the classic prescriptions of rest, fluids and an over-the-counter pain reliever and fever-reducer like aspirin, acetaminophen or ibuprofen topped medical staffers' personal choices in a survey of 43 medical workers by Dr. Kathi J. Kemper of Children's Hospital in Boston.Other findings:* 81 percent used some cold medication; 60 percent favored fever reducers, while a third used decongestants.
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