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By DIANA JEAN SCHEMO | October 20, 1991
Paris -- In their latest push for European political and military unity Wednesday, French President Francois Mitterrand and German Chancellor Helmut Kohl had to blow their trumpets loudly. Otherwise, the crash of the European Community's last political debacle in Yugoslavia would have drowned out their music.True, Serbian and Croatian leaders had reached a cease-fire agreement in Moscow, and the now defunct eight-man Yugoslav presidency sat down for talks in the Hague. But the Moscow ceasefire was the ninth since the fighting started, the Hague ceasefire a tenth -- grim indications that it may well take an eleventh or even twentieth before the parties will really be ready to lay down their guns.
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NEWS
March 28, 2003
Contraceptive bill's provisions misrepresented The Sun's articles on emergency contraception (EC) legislation completely misrepresented the intent of the bill ("Morning-after pill purchase wins approval from delegates," March 25). The articles and the comments it cites insinuate that under this bill a woman would have been able to walk into a pharmacy and buy EC as she would aspirin or cough medicine. But this simply is not the case. The bill did not authorize "over-the-counter" sale of EC; indeed, EC has not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for "over-the-counter" use. It would be more accurate to say that the bill would have allowed licensed pharmacists acting "behind the counter" to dispense EC. EC, a high dose of oral contraceptives, is already available in pharmacies to women who have a prescription.
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BUSINESS
By Journal of Commerce | October 29, 1992
U.S. officials said yesterday that there was little hope of salvaging a world trade accord soon, and they told the European Community the United States would announce trade sanctions in a related dispute on oilseeds shortly after the U.S. presidential election Tuesday.The U.S. announcement of more than $300 million in punitive duties could occur at a Nov. 4 meeting of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade in Geneva, according to U.S. officials. U.S. Trade Representative Carla A. Hills said retaliation would come "in a matter of days."
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2001
Time was when home economics classes embraced the pursuit of the perfectly stitched apron and the crisp-but-not-burnt sugar cookie. But women like Betty Crocker don't teach home economics anymore. Deborah Sparks does. And now the class is called "Family and Consumer Sciences" in Anne Arundel County, "Family Studies" in Baltimore County, "Human Ecology" at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. Sparks, a teacher at Magothy River Middle School in Arnold, began her career when only girls took the class devoted to cooking and sewing and making a home.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | November 29, 1992
LONDON -- The European Community was supposed to thro open all international frontiers within itself Jan. 1, as the single market comes into effect. Passport and customs checks were to end and EC residents were to be allowed free and easy access into and out of one another's countries.But the dream of open borders will not be realized, at least not yet, though some borders will be opened more widely than others.This has caused controversy and disappointment throughout the community.The single market was created to facilitate the free flow of goods, services and people throughout the 12 countries.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to the Sun | June 29, 1991
BERLIN -- Faced with a potential war on their doorstep, Western European leaders implemented newly developed crisis management mechanisms yesterday to try to force Yugoslavia and its two breakaway republics into peace negotiations.At the same time, German officials said they had set up a team to organize the evacuation of 10,000 tourists from Yugoslavia and to cope with the possible influx of 20,000 refugees from the fighting.The 12 European Community leaders meeting in Luxembourg agreed to freeze $1 billion in economic credits and yesterday sent three of their foreign ministers to Yugoslavia with a five-point peace plan to stop the fighting and suspend the declarations of independence made by Croatia and Slovenia.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Paris Bureau of The Sun | January 28, 1991
PARIS -- The European Community's steps to create a political identity for itself have been seriously hindered as the euphoria over the Cold War's end gives way to a more complex landscape of competing interests among the EC's 12 members, according to diplomatic observers and analysts here.The most dramatic -- and recent-- display of how national interests are undermining the drive to forge a common foreign policy came as the Jan. 15 United Nations deadline for an Iraqi withdrawal from Kuwait approached.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | May 12, 1992
LONDON -- Britain is in conflict again with its partners in the European Community, this time over border controls.Britain wants to keep them after Jan. 1. The other 11 members of the EC want them to come off, though only for EC nationals.Home Secretary Kenneth Clarke warned yesterday that were Britain to lift all controls at the frontiers the country would soon be swamped with illegal aliens, many of whom would have entered through other EC countries. Social instability would result, he said.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | November 7, 1992
LONDON -- The European Community, alarmed at the prospect of a ruinous trade war with the United States, went into a flurry of meetings trying to get negotiations back on track.Britain's Prime Minister John Major, who occupies the EC's rotating presidency, called in EC Commission President Jacques Delors to insist something be done. The talks derailed in Chicago on Tuesday on the question of subsidies to European farmers producing oilseeds.Mr. Delors is at the center of a hot controversy stoked by allegations he sabotaged the talks and thereby precipitated the U.S. decision to levy $300 million in taxes on EC products: German, French and British oilseeds, and white wines, mainly French, German and Italian.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau of The Sun | October 29, 1991
LONDON -- Twenty years ago yesterday, the British Parliament endorsed a Conservative government's decision to join the European Common Market. The Labor Party opposed it.How things change.Today, opposition to the European Community is centered in the Conservative Party and is growing, threatening the party's cohesion.Labor is all pro-Europe. Neil Kinnock, the party leader, denounced the Conservatives yesterday for conducting their policy toward the EC "not on the basis of what is best for Britain but on the basis of what will keep the cracks in the Tory Party as obscure as possible."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 13, 2001
United Airlines parent UAL Corp. won European antitrust approval yesterday for its $11.6 billion purchase of US Airways Group Inc. after pledging to give up some takeoff and landing slots in Germany. The largest airline merger will mostly affect the United States by giving United access to US Airways north-south routes on the East Coast. Still, because United has a joint venture on trans-Atlantic routes with Deutsche Lufthansa AG under the Star Alliance, United had to eliminate some overlap in flights.
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 22, 2000
IN HIGH SCHOOL, Vicki Wisner was the girl who refused to take home economics where mostly girls were taught to sew and cook. Instead, the Taneytown woman who has spent the past two decades making ballgowns, wedding dresses and Civil War attire for re-enactors, felt more at home taking shop class. "The way they taught sewing in high school was so uninteresting," Wisner said, thinking back to her high school days. "I hated home economics. I took all the shop classes instead." But Wisner was involved in theater in high school and got to know Dorothy Elderdice, who sewed all the costumes for area high schools' musical productions.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1998
The new leader of Planned Parenthood of Maryland Inc. yesterday decried a lack of national revulsion against abortion clinic-related murders in the United States and Canada."
FEATURES
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1998
Once upon a time, middle-school girls learned to bake apple pie crusts, sew pillows and take a sick person's temperature in their single-sex course called Home Ec.These days, they still learn about food and sewing, but they work beside boys in food labs, figuring out such things as how long it takes noodles and egg whites to digest in saliva. They get dating tips, earn baby-sitting certificates, design their own prom wear and learn about self-esteem.And the class is now called Family and Consumer Science.
NEWS
By Jean Leslie and Jean Leslie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 13, 1997
$TC THE EC 225 Committee -- residents who want to highlight Ellicott City's 225th birthday -- worked for four years to prepare for 1997's celebrations.The mission of committee members -- Cynthia Hirshberg, John Slater, Ed Lilley, Darlene Schneeberger, Herbert Johl, Warren Galke, Janet Kusterer, Randy Peters and Kathy Potocki -- was to beautify Historic Ellicott City and surrounding areas.In 1994, they sponsored an activity for 14 Patapsco Middle School students, who cleared the weeds from the land between the Firehouse Museum and the Masonic Lodge and planted donated plants to mimic a garden as it would have looked in the late 19th century.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 29, 1997
BRUSSELS, Belgium -- AMR Corp.'s American Airlines yesterday called "extraordinarily unfair" a European Commission plan to require it and British Airways PLC to give up 350 takeoff-and-landing slots at London's Heathrow Airport to win approval for their alliance.AMR also suggested the accord could fall apart if European regulators insist on these terms."It is doubtful the alliance could be consummated under such onerous terms as these," said Chris Chiames, a spokesman for American, in response to a Financial Times report of the EC draft proposal.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Staff Writer | October 17, 1992
BIRMINGHAM, England -- The leaders of the 12 countries of the European Community wrestled all day yesterday with the slippery idea of "subsidiarity" and, in the end, got a weary draw.The aim of the European summit here in the struggling city of Birmingham was to find a clear definition for the subsidiarity principle, which, it is hoped, will make the EC more "user friendly."Subsidiarity is the term for reversing the flow of power to the EC center and sending it back to the member governments.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Staff Writer | June 26, 1992
LISBON, Portugal -- He is a small man with no taste for flamboyance. He favors the sour, skeptical look of a French customs official; he is a bureaucrat.But he has the quality that George Bush is said to yearn after: He has the vision thing.Jacques Delors is one of the most important men in Europe. He is the servant of Europe. Though hardly known in the United States, his face is instantly recognized throughout the Continent. He is widely admired, but not everywhere.Here and there he is vehemently hated, by those who believe he is determined to sap the sovereignty of national governments and draw all the European states into a federal union.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 15, 1997
BRUSSELS -- European Commission officials said concessions offered yesterday by Boeing Co. don't go far enough to overcome European objections to the aerospace giant's $15.5 billion acquisition of McDonnell Douglas Corp.Boeing, facing a commission-set deadline of midnight last night Brussels time, which had already passed, offered proposals that address one of three outstanding issues, but the offers aren't enough to close the antitrust probe, a commission official said."Things had not been sorted out," said European Union Competition Commissioner Karel Van Miert in an interview with Bloomberg News.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | December 8, 1993
BRUSSELS, Belgium -- With arguments resolved over wheat and corn subsidies, and exports of pig meat and skimmed milk powder, the world trade talks came down to this yesterday: Can the United States tolerate France's determination to go on protecting and subsidizing its movie industry in order to stave off a perceived Hollywood onslaught from the likes of "Jurassic Park" and "Terminator 2"?After almost 23 hours of negotiations with the European Community's chief negotiator Monday and yesterday, the answer from U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor was no.He then left Brussels to explain his views to world trade negotiators in Geneva, before returning to Washington.
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