Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEbt
IN THE NEWS

Ebt

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1997
A tanker truck barrels along I-70 at 55 mph, but suddenly starts skidding. The tires squeal and smoke, and the smell of burning rubber pervades the air.These are all things that usually precede a horrible accident. But not this time.The tanker bounces up and down as it slides along the highway, but it doesn't jackknife; it skids in a straight line.The 150 spectators standing 10 feet away are safe. They break into applause.The big rig stops in an amazingly short 160 feet. Driver Dorsey Hutchins flashes a big smile as he hops out of the cab. "I had it under control all the time," he says.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Ian Duncan
The Baltimore Sun
| October 12, 2013
A technical glitch left shoppers who rely on food stamps to buy their groceries unable to pay at many supermarkets for much of the day Saturday. A spokeswoman for Xerox, which runs the benefits system in Maryland and 16 other states, said the underlying problem had been fixed Saturday afternoon but some stores were still experience problems. Brian M. Schleter, a spokesman for the Maryland Department of Human Resources, which is responsible for the EBT - or Electronic Benefits Transfer - card system, confirmed the problem.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 11, 1990
The Edwin Booth Theater Inc. will present the fun-filled musical "Snoopy" at 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17, and 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 18, at Harford Day School, 715 Moores Mill Road, Bel Air.Additional performances are scheduled for 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Nov. 23 and 24, and 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 25.The family show is filled with song, dance and comedy. The show features such favorite cartoon characters as Snoopy, Charlie Brown and his sister Sally, Lucy and Linus Van Pelt, Peppermint Patti and Woodstock.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | May 18, 2008
I understand the inclination to take the turtle home. You're driving along a road that used to be a country road, but is now a congested commuter road, leading to any of a dozen nearby cul-de-sacs or pastel-colored townhouse tracts or a shopping center anchored by Wal-Mart. You spot a turtle ahead. The humane instinct, centered in the heart, sends a signal to the brain, and suddenly you find yourself pulling to the shoulder, stepping out of your motorized turtle-killing machine, picking the reptile up and either carrying it across the road, its intended destination, or taking it home.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan
The Baltimore Sun
| October 12, 2013
A technical glitch left shoppers who rely on food stamps to buy their groceries unable to pay at many supermarkets for much of the day Saturday. A spokeswoman for Xerox, which runs the benefits system in Maryland and 16 other states, said the underlying problem had been fixed Saturday afternoon but some stores were still experience problems. Brian M. Schleter, a spokesman for the Maryland Department of Human Resources, which is responsible for the EBT - or Electronic Benefits Transfer - card system, confirmed the problem.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | May 18, 2008
I understand the inclination to take the turtle home. You're driving along a road that used to be a country road, but is now a congested commuter road, leading to any of a dozen nearby cul-de-sacs or pastel-colored townhouse tracts or a shopping center anchored by Wal-Mart. You spot a turtle ahead. The humane instinct, centered in the heart, sends a signal to the brain, and suddenly you find yourself pulling to the shoulder, stepping out of your motorized turtle-killing machine, picking the reptile up and either carrying it across the road, its intended destination, or taking it home.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2010
City leaders named a "food czar" Tuesday to lead the battle against poor eating habits that are linked to the intractable obesity epidemic and alarming levels of heart disease and diabetes in Baltimore's poorer neighborhoods. As the city's new food policy director, Holly Freishtat will be responsible for improving demand and access to healthful foods. She joins just a few others with similar missions around the nation, including in New York and Boston. "We want all of Baltimore to have healthier foods," said Freishtat, a sustainable food specialist and Baltimore native, whose position will be funded through nonprofit and business sources.
NEWS
By Tom Albright, Holly Freishtat and Robert S. Lawrence | November 14, 2011
In Baltimore City, 1 in 8 families with young children are "food insecure," and 20 percent of all residents live in poverty. More than half a million Marylanders get help affording food through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). In fact, SNAP, or what we used to call food stamps, enrolled 45 million people nationwide this year, a leap from 25 million in 2008. Shouldn't SNAP participants in Baltimore - or other cities - be able to spend their SNAP dollars on nutritious, locally produced food?
NEWS
April 18, 1997
Police Blotter is a sampling of crimes in Howard County.Ellicott City: 2500 block of McKenzie Road: Someone entered house Wednesday and took a number of food items.Ellicott City: 6800 block of Old Waterloo Road: Someone broke into a house Wednesday through a first-floor sliding door. The screen door was slit and the sliding door pried open. A bike and jewelry were taken.Ellicott City: 8500 block of U.S. 40: A 1997 Nissan Maxima was stolen from the Nissan West lot between March 31 and Monday.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | November 7, 1992
Plastic is in at Giant Food.The Landover-based grocery company, the dominant chain in the Baltimore and Washington markets, will accept Visa and MasterCard credit cards, as well as MOST bank debit cards, at 92 of its 96 Maryland stores by Friday, company officials said yesterday.The decision came after a tryout last month at six or seven stores in Montgomery County was well-received by customers, said David Sykes, Giant's senior vice president for finance."It doesn't slow up lines at all," Mr. Sykes said.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1997
A tanker truck barrels along I-70 at 55 mph, but suddenly starts skidding. The tires squeal and smoke, and the smell of burning rubber pervades the air.These are all things that usually precede a horrible accident. But not this time.The tanker bounces up and down as it slides along the highway, but it doesn't jackknife; it skids in a straight line.The 150 spectators standing 10 feet away are safe. They break into applause.The big rig stops in an amazingly short 160 feet. Driver Dorsey Hutchins flashes a big smile as he hops out of the cab. "I had it under control all the time," he says.
NEWS
November 11, 1990
The Edwin Booth Theater Inc. will present the fun-filled musical "Snoopy" at 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17, and 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 18, at Harford Day School, 715 Moores Mill Road, Bel Air.Additional performances are scheduled for 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Nov. 23 and 24, and 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 25.The family show is filled with song, dance and comedy. The show features such favorite cartoon characters as Snoopy, Charlie Brown and his sister Sally, Lucy and Linus Van Pelt, Peppermint Patti and Woodstock.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | January 20, 1993
It's the beginning of the month -- "check day" in the parlance of the state's welfare recipients -- and the lines are forming in Mondawmin Mall.But not at the check-cashing counter in B&B Liquors. The line is at a nearby Maryland National Bank automated teller machine, where welfare recipients with "Independence" cards mingle with bank customers with "Most" cards. Only someone who knows the distinctive red-and-blue design of the Independence cards could pick out the welfare recipients.With more than three-quarters of its clients on line in this electronic banking system, Maryland is just weeks away from becoming the nation's first "paperless" welfare state.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.