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September 30, 1993
A fanciful brocade gown by Nina Ricci will be one of the designs featured at the Ebony Fashion Fair, the 36th annual style extravaganza which comes to Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall Sunday at 5 p.m. Proceeds from the show which presents creations by the world's top designers such as Oscar de la Renta, Givenchy and Valentino will benefit the charities of the Baltimore chapter of Delta Sigma Theta. Call (410) 783-8000 for ticket information.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Brian Melton, For The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
Simply referring to Maria Trent, M.D., as a pediatrician is a bit like calling Barack Obama an executive. The Johns Hopkins Children's Center doctor's continuing achievements as a researcher, clinician, professor and advocate for adolescent health education brought her to the attention of Ebony magazine's editorial board, which named her in its December issue as one of the nation's 100 most influential African-Americans for 2013. She and her fellow honorees - including Kerry Washington, Magic Johnson, Harry Belafonte, Marian Wright Edelman and the aforementioned executive - were celebrated this month at New York's Lincoln Center.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 23, 1990
Before August Wilson's "Ma Rainey's Black Bottom" went into rehearsals at Center Stage, Ebony Jo-Ann, who plays the title role, told the director: "I have always felt that I was put on this earth to play this woman."It's a strong statement, but then, it comes from a strong woman. "My depiction is raw. Sometimes I frighten the other actors," says this strikingly stunning actress, who looks as if she were born with her hands on her hips.Area audiences have seen Ms. Jo-Ann, 45, portray a variety of forceful characters in recent years.
ENTERTAINMENT
The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 21, 2011
Myranda Stephens, a reporter for WBFF-TV (Fox 45), has been named one of EBONY Magazine's 10 Sexiest Singles. The local reporter is part of the annual feature that appears in the October issue of magazine. Stephens, 33, said she entered the contest on a "whim" and can't believe she was chosen. "I remember as a child, flipping through my mother's EBONY magazines, gazing at all of the African-American celebrities. Now, I'm featured in EBONY! What an honor, and what an amazing experience," she said in a statement.
NEWS
By Myrna Oliver and Myrna Oliver,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 9, 2005
John H. Johnson, the daringly innovative publisher of Ebony and Jet magazines who countered mid-20th century publishing stereotypes by providing positive coverage of blacks in mass-marketed publications, has died. He was 87. Mr. Johnson died yesterday of heart failure at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, his Chicago-based Johnson Publishing Co. announced. Born into poverty in Arkansas, Mr. Johnson sought to increase African-Americans' pride in themselves by showcasing their achievements to the world.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2005
Photographer Monroe S. Frederick unfolds the dashiki he wore while on a Jet magazine assignment in Mississippi 35 years ago. "There's the bullet hole," he says. It's in the right sleeve. Somebody took a potshot at him when he was covering a garbage workers union strike in Jackson, Miss. "I don't know who it was," Frederick says. "Every time I went to Mississippi somebody pulled a gun. That was the quickest place to get hurt." A Baltimore native who grew up on Druid Hill Avenue in the same house he lives in now, Frederick was a photographic stringer for Jet and Ebony magazines for 25 years.
NEWS
By Jason George and Jason George,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 15, 2005
CHICAGO - For Lester Howell, 54, John H. Johnson's life meant that even he could shake poverty. For Katie Brown, 64, it showed that an employer can stop and say hello, no matter how many rungs up the corporate ladder he has climbed. And for Shemari Wilcoxon, 16, it was living history. Business leaders and media giants paid their respects yesterday to the Chicagoan and creator of Ebony and Jet magazines, but it was the hundreds, if not thousands, of everyday people who waited up to an hour and lined Michigan Avenue at Johnson Publishing Co. headquarters to say goodbye.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | September 8, 1993
The African-American woman is a fashion force to reckon with, and Ebony magazine and Spiegel Inc. are tapping her distinctive style and consumer power with E STYLE, a new clothing and accessory catalog.The catalog debuts this week, going out to 1.5 million African-American women. It features career, casual and evening wear as well as head-to-toe accessories.E STYLE picks up on the current trends but gives some of them an ethnic edge with prints and patterns that celebrate African heritage.
NEWS
By David Simon and David Simon,Staff Writer | August 27, 1992
Baltimore homicide detectives say they have identified several potential suspects in the recent murder of 9-year-old Ebony Scott and are awaiting laboratory tests on physical evidence gathered in their investigation.The Aug. 13 slaying of the New York City girl, who was strangled, sexually molested and then dumped in a trash bin at West Baltimore'sGeorge B. Murphy Homes housing project, has become a priority case in the city homicide unit, receiving the attention of a detective sergeant and three other investigators.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | June 17, 1992
Ebony Briscoe is angry. The 11-year-old West Baltimore girl wants to know who shot her and why.Ebony was waiting in line for a snow cone Monday evening when she heard a flurry of gunfire.She managed to push her little sister to the ground.But before Ebony could duck, she was struck in the back by a bullet."He's a bad person," Ebony says of her unknown assailant.She was one of three people wounded Monday when three men drove up and sprayed the corner of Riggs and Arlington avenues with 13 bullets in what police describe as a drug-related shooting.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2008
At the post-show party for the 51st Annual Ebony Fashion Fair , held at Morgan State University's Murphy Fine Arts Center, it became apparent that it wasn't just the show that has a proud history. When the Baltimore Alumnae Chapter of the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc. began hosting the touring fashion show more than 50 years ago, the chapter already had a 44-year jump on it. And for many of the party's guests, the history of both was a personal one. "It's awesome. I've been coming since I was in the fifth grade.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | October 21, 2007
SPIRITS WERE AS HIGH AS SOME OF THE hemlines at the 50th Annual Ebony Fashion Fair. A crowd of 2,000, mostly women, converged on Morgan State University's Murphy Fine Arts Center for the traveling fashion show. This was a time to celebrate 50 years in business, and for the same 50 years, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc. has been the show's host here, using its part of the proceeds to benefit its scholarship program. In its first few years, "a lot of the models couldn't stay in the hotels in town, so they stayed at the [sorority members']
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2005
Photographer Monroe S. Frederick unfolds the dashiki he wore while on a Jet magazine assignment in Mississippi 35 years ago. "There's the bullet hole," he says. It's in the right sleeve. Somebody took a potshot at him when he was covering a garbage workers union strike in Jackson, Miss. "I don't know who it was," Frederick says. "Every time I went to Mississippi somebody pulled a gun. That was the quickest place to get hurt." A Baltimore native who grew up on Druid Hill Avenue in the same house he lives in now, Frederick was a photographic stringer for Jet and Ebony magazines for 25 years.
NEWS
By Jason George and Jason George,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 15, 2005
CHICAGO - For Lester Howell, 54, John H. Johnson's life meant that even he could shake poverty. For Katie Brown, 64, it showed that an employer can stop and say hello, no matter how many rungs up the corporate ladder he has climbed. And for Shemari Wilcoxon, 16, it was living history. Business leaders and media giants paid their respects yesterday to the Chicagoan and creator of Ebony and Jet magazines, but it was the hundreds, if not thousands, of everyday people who waited up to an hour and lined Michigan Avenue at Johnson Publishing Co. headquarters to say goodbye.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 14, 2005
WASHINGTON - "Why is there an Ebony? If some white guy started a magazine called Ivory, you blacks would riot in protest." Give me a dollar for every white guy who ever asked me that and I'd be too rich to write columns for a living. The point of the question, of course, is that white folk are oppressed by pernicious double standards. It's a silly argument, and I've explained why many times in this space. But today, rather than answer the issue behind the question, I'd like to answer the question itself.
NEWS
By Myrna Oliver and Myrna Oliver,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 9, 2005
John H. Johnson, the daringly innovative publisher of Ebony and Jet magazines who countered mid-20th century publishing stereotypes by providing positive coverage of blacks in mass-marketed publications, has died. He was 87. Mr. Johnson died yesterday of heart failure at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, his Chicago-based Johnson Publishing Co. announced. Born into poverty in Arkansas, Mr. Johnson sought to increase African-Americans' pride in themselves by showcasing their achievements to the world.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | July 2, 2005
It was around 2:30 in the afternoon on June 21 when Ebony Jenkins' grandmother dropped her off at the Owings Mills station subway stop. As the girl prepared to head south to meet friends at Mondawmin Mall, her grandmother admonished her to be careful. "OK, Nana," Ebony said. The grandmother hasn't seen 16-year-old Ebony Jenkins since. Her mother, Karen Juste, hasn't seen her, either. Juste sat in her Owings Mills home yesterday, looking very much like a woman who has had very little sleep for 10 days.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune zHC ALB | December 26, 1991
Earlier this fall, we wrote about a new catalog targeted at African-American women that will debut early in 1993; to be called "E Style," the catalog venture is being developed by Ebony magazine and Spiegel Inc.We've since learned that a catalog with the same target audience already exists. Essence By Mail catalog was launched seven years ago by Essence Communications, Inc., publisher of Essence magazine, and Hanover Direct, Inc., a mail-order retailer.Essence Catalog Director Michele Mullings, says, "We feature African-American women who model garments with the black figure (fit)
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | July 2, 2005
It was around 2:30 in the afternoon on June 21 when Ebony Jenkins' grandmother dropped her off at the Owings Mills station subway stop. As the girl prepared to head south to meet friends at Mondawmin Mall, her grandmother admonished her to be careful. "OK, Nana," Ebony said. The grandmother hasn't seen 16-year-old Ebony Jenkins since. Her mother, Karen Juste, hasn't seen her, either. Juste sat in her Owings Mills home yesterday, looking very much like a woman who has had very little sleep for 10 days.
NEWS
November 14, 2004
On November 4, 2004, RANDOLPH E.; beloved husband of Deborah R. Also survived by four sons, Randolph Andrews, Jamal Park, Gerard Boyd and Jameel Talley; one daughter, Ebony Andrews; two brothers, Joseph Mercer and Freddie Avery; two sisters Joann Carter and Edith Andrews, a special aunt Edith Andrews and two grandchildren. Friends may call at the Wylie Funeral Home, 638 N. Gilmor St., on Sunday 12 to 4 P.M. Family will receive friends on Monday 11 A.M. Funeral 11:30 A.M. at Trinity Baptist Church, 1601 Druid Hill Avenue.
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