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NEWS
October 13, 2014
Federal Centers for Disease Control Director Thomas R. Frieden has been saying for weeks that Americans have little to fear from the deadly Ebola epidemic that has killed some 4,000 people in West Africa. But with news over the weekend that a nurse at the hospital in Texas where the first reported case of Ebola in the U.S. was treated has tested positive for the virus, even he now admits the nation may not be adequately prepared for an outbreak. Making sure that it is should be the CDC's top priority until we can be assured that what happened in Texas won't be repeated again elsewhere.
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NEWS
October 13, 2014
Federal Centers for Disease Control Director Thomas R. Frieden has been saying for weeks that Americans have little to fear from the deadly Ebola epidemic that has killed some 4,000 people in West Africa. But with news over the weekend that a nurse at the hospital in Texas where the first reported case of Ebola in the U.S. was treated has tested positive for the virus, even he now admits the nation may not be adequately prepared for an outbreak. Making sure that it is should be the CDC's top priority until we can be assured that what happened in Texas won't be repeated again elsewhere.
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NEWS
October 9, 2014
While much of the response to the Ebola epidemic in West Africa is contingent on the United States government's public health and military actions ( "Ebola hits home," Oct. 2), health professionals and government officials have been quite reluctant to come to terms with how America's history of public health espionage and medical mistreatment complicate the battle against Ebola. America has a long history of medical mistreatment and imperialism which are now providing the fuel for Ebola conspiracy beliefs.
NEWS
October 9, 2014
While much of the response to the Ebola epidemic in West Africa is contingent on the United States government's public health and military actions ( "Ebola hits home," Oct. 2), health professionals and government officials have been quite reluctant to come to terms with how America's history of public health espionage and medical mistreatment complicate the battle against Ebola. America has a long history of medical mistreatment and imperialism which are now providing the fuel for Ebola conspiracy beliefs.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2004
The prick of a needle, the slip of a scalpel -- routine accidents in any hospital or medical lab. But for the scientists who work with nature's deadliest germs, handling razor-sharp instruments in the clumsy spacesuits of the nation's highest-security biodefense research centers, momentary mistakes are the stuff of nightmares. In a Fort Detrick isolation unit known as "the slammer," a young virologist is in the 10th day of a watch for symptoms of Ebola, a highly contagious disease in which headache and fever can swiftly progress to uncontrollable bleeding and death.
NEWS
October 6, 2014
Your editorial on the Ebola virus' recent appearance in Texas perfectly expressed my fears and concerns regarding the outbreak ( "Ebola hits home," Oct. 2). I would add one more point that should be made: When medical officials say Ebola can only be spread via body fluids, they usually cite blood, vomit, urine and diarrhea. However, bodily fluids also include sweat and saliva, both of which are secreted daily in the most mundane ways. I strongly urge people in Dallas, where I was recently a graduate student at Southern Methodist University, to stock up on bleach-based cleansers and to refrain from unnecessarily touching their faces, especially if their hands have been in contact with objects commonly carried around in crowded public spaces, like laptops and cellphones.
NEWS
September 20, 2014
It may be reasonable to be prepared in case Ebola presents in the U.S., but would our population not do better to listen to rational information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other authoritative sources? Flu presents a real, proven threat to health, life and productivity in the U.S. ( "The Ebola threat," Sept. 16) We would do well to have our flu shot before concerning ourselves with a less-easily-contracted illness which has no record of originating here.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
A man who was admitted to the National Institute of Health in Bethesda last week after being exposed to Ebola was released Tuesday, after his symptoms were determined not to be related to the virus, the NIH said. The patient was identified only as an American doctor who had a "high-risk exposure" when he was accidentally stuck with a needle while treating patients of the virus in Sierra Leone. He flew back to the U.S. and was admitted to the NIH Clinical Center's Special Clinical Studies Unit on Sept.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 28, 1995
KIKWIT, Zaire -- For Casongo Malele, the news that her sister was being moved from Ward 3 to Ward 2 in the overtaxed hospital here, the epicenter of Zaire's Ebola virus epidemic, was a sign of hope.Like nearly everyone in this city of 500,000, Miss Malele, a 24-year-old student, had come to regard Ward 3 as a sort of terminus for those stricken by the disease, whose symptoms of bloody diarrhea and vomiting are now known and dreaded by all here."You have to avoid touching their blood, their saliva, their vomit or their stools," Miss Malele explained, confident that, with her mastery of these precautions, she would soon be given gloves and a mask and allowed to enter the ward to see her older sister, a nurse-trainee at the hospital.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Writer | June 11, 1995
FREDERICK -- Behind sea-green cinder block walls and stainless steel doors, protected by space suits and sterilizing chemical showers, scientists here are searching for weapons to fight one of Earth's most dangerous predators.This is Fort Detrick's U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, or USAMRIID, one of only five laboratories in the world equipped for the study of such super-lethal, untreatable diseases as Marburg, Lassa and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever.But recent books, a movie and a deadly epidemic in Africa have focused an international spotlight on USAMRIID's work on one murderous microbe in particular: the Ebola virus.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
WEATHER Mostly sunny with a high of 68, and a low of 53.   TRAFFIC Get the latest on delays for this morning's commute from baltimoresun.com     FROM LAST NIGHT  Police are searching for a suspect they believe shot his girlfriend's ex-husband with a BB gun at Hereford High School last night.     TODAY'S FRONT PAGE Federal officials announced that they will screen international passengers at five major U.S. airports. A U.S  Department of Justice official promised that his agency's investigation of police brutality in the Baltimore Police Department would be a “candid”  assessment.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
Forty health care workers in Mali are receiving a vaccine that could guard against the Ebola virus as a University of Maryland School of Medicine center launches the first human trials of the experimental vaccine. One person received the vaccine Wednesday, two more were expected to receive it Thursday and dozens more are scheduled to follow in the coming weeks. The inoculation was developed at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in Bethesda using an inert virus that is coated in an Ebola protein, so the body builds immunity to the deadly virus.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector and Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Federal officials announced Wednesday that they plan to screen international passengers for Ebola at five major U.S. airports, while hospitals around the country continue to isolate patients showing Ebola-like symptoms. At least four Baltimore-area hospitals recently segregated patients with travel histories and other possible indications of Ebola, though the virus was ruled out in each case. Other cases were suspected and ruled out at two Washington-area hospitals last week. Meanwhile, the first U.S. patient diagnosed with the virus died Wednesday in Dallas.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
A man who was admitted to the National Institute of Health in Bethesda last week after being exposed to Ebola was released Tuesday, after his symptoms were determined not to be related to the virus, the NIH said. The patient was identified only as an American doctor who had a "high-risk exposure" when he was accidentally stuck with a needle while treating patients of the virus in Sierra Leone. He flew back to the U.S. and was admitted to the NIH Clinical Center's Special Clinical Studies Unit on Sept.
NEWS
October 6, 2014
Your editorial on the Ebola virus' recent appearance in Texas perfectly expressed my fears and concerns regarding the outbreak ( "Ebola hits home," Oct. 2). I would add one more point that should be made: When medical officials say Ebola can only be spread via body fluids, they usually cite blood, vomit, urine and diarrhea. However, bodily fluids also include sweat and saliva, both of which are secreted daily in the most mundane ways. I strongly urge people in Dallas, where I was recently a graduate student at Southern Methodist University, to stock up on bleach-based cleansers and to refrain from unnecessarily touching their faces, especially if their hands have been in contact with objects commonly carried around in crowded public spaces, like laptops and cellphones.
NEWS
By Julie Stanik-Hutt, Janet Selway and Andrea Schram | October 5, 2014
In the last few weeks we've heard a lot about the Ebola epidemic and work to contain its spread and potentially tragic consequences. But influenza is a preventable infectious disease that represents a much greater risk to the health of Marylanders. Influenza (flu) is a seasonal disease that is most common in the winter and spring. Last year, almost 25,000 Marylanders sought care for flu symptoms. Anyone can get sick from the flu, but preschool age children (under 5 years of age), pregnant women and senior citizens are especially vulnerable to getting sick from influenza.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
While Maryland health officials urged caregivers this week to be alert for possible Ebola virus cases, they were also quick to emphasize there are other — perhaps more contagious — pathogens that they are also monitoring. Public health officials around the world remain on watch for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, while the United States is on guard for enterovirus D68 cases among children. As flu season begins, surveillance for that illness is resuming, and other potentially deadly threats such as avian flu lurk, as well.
HEALTH
Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
As health officials fail to contain West Africa's Ebola outbreak, recent scares at two Baltimore-area hospitals highlight the need for hospitals here and across the United States to prepare space and equipment for what some consider inevitable - the arrival of the deadly virus here. While experts say the chances of an epidemic spreading in the U.S. are low, there is a real possibility that someone could come down with Ebola after returning from a trip to Africa, they said. Hospitals routinely ask patients with flu-like symptoms whether they have visited that continent recently.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
While Maryland health officials urged caregivers this week to be alert for possible Ebola virus cases, they were also quick to emphasize there are other — perhaps more contagious — pathogens that they are also monitoring. Public health officials around the world remain on watch for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, while the United States is on guard for enterovirus D68 cases among children. As flu season begins, surveillance for that illness is resuming, and other potentially deadly threats such as avian flu lurk, as well.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Officials at two Washington, D.C.-area hospitals said Friday they had isolated patients over fears of Ebola after the nation's first case of the deadly virus was confirmed in Dallas this week. But officials at one of the hospitals, Shady Grove Adventist Hospital in Rockville, determined late Friday that their patient had malaria, not Ebola, hospital officials said in a statement late Friday. Howard University Hospital quarantined a patient who had recently traveled to Nigeria out of "an abundance of caution," officials said.
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