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Ebb Tide

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By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | July 28, 2007
Peggy Lawrence floats this query from Bel Air: "The dictionary meaning of ebb tide is `outgoing or falling tide,' as opposed to `flood tide' - `incoming or rising tide.' What is it called when the water is not moving and there seems to be no tide?" That one- to three-hour period of scant movement around high or low tide is called the "slack tide." Best time for crabbing and clamming, I hear. The annual Chesapeake Bay swim starts at slack tide so swimmers aren't fighting strong tidal currents.
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NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | July 28, 2007
Peggy Lawrence floats this query from Bel Air: "The dictionary meaning of ebb tide is `outgoing or falling tide,' as opposed to `flood tide' - `incoming or rising tide.' What is it called when the water is not moving and there seems to be no tide?" That one- to three-hour period of scant movement around high or low tide is called the "slack tide." Best time for crabbing and clamming, I hear. The annual Chesapeake Bay swim starts at slack tide so swimmers aren't fighting strong tidal currents.
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NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 11, 1997
THE PRIEST at Phil Dypsky's funeral yesterday morning began with these words: "The souls of the just are in the hands of God." But, with so many echoes in the sanctuary of St. Casimir's Church -- and truck noise from O'Donnell Street outside -- I heard what the priest said as, "The souls of the jester in the hands of God."Either way, it fit.Phil Dypsky, who died at 83 this week (see obituary, Page 5B) made a lot of people laugh, mostly with gags about himself, and starting with his toupee.
NEWS
July 3, 2007
There was good news Down East yesterday. President Bush and Russian President Vladimir V. Putin got along well enough during an outdoorsy day at the Bush family retreat on the coast at Kennebunkport, Maine; this might help stop the drift into a new and pointless Cold War between Washington and Moscow. Mr. Putin caught a striped bass - perhaps the best fish American waters can offer - but then threw it back. And, oh yes, Mr. Putin expanded on his proposal for recasting the controversial American missile shield: Put it in Russia, he said, and we won't take offense.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 27, 1991
Of the three exhibits inaugurating the enlarged Academy of the Arts in Easton, "Herman Maril Seascapes" (through March 2) occupies the premier place in the academy's two main galleries and is clearly the most successful, because of Maril's art.The artist's combinations of abstract design, beautiful color and almost palpable atmosphere seem ever more timeless as time goes on. These works, covering more than half a century from the 1932 "Early Harbor Scene"...
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2002
MY PERFECT weekend getaway on the bay involved a kayak, a bicycle and a tent. Fine to the first two, said my friend, but did I have something against hot showers at night after sweating all day? And would breakfast without gnats be possible? So we recently took advantage of an attribute of the bay region's geography that lends itself beautifully to combining outdoor exercise with bed-and-breakfast luxury. By paddle and pedal, we did a daylong loop through a lovely, lonely section of the Eastern Shore - returning almost to where we began without retracing our route.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 31, 1995
I have always thought of Herman Maril as an abstract artist -- not in the usual sense of non-representational, but in the dictionary sense of making an abstract, epitomizing or summarizing. The fine exhibit of Maril's work currently at St. John's College in Annapolis only confirms that opinion.Maril (1908-1986) was a Baltimorean whose career spanned six decades, from the late 1920s to his death. The show's 49 paintings and drawings give us as true a picture of Maril's art as we're likely to get, thanks to curator David Scott, an art historian and former director of the National Museum of American Art. He concentrates on a group of major paintings from Maril's later years, when his style was fully developed, but also includes early works and drawings.
NEWS
October 19, 2003
Backing choice at the expense of living babies In the editorial "Ebb tide?" (Oct. 14), The Sun claims that the partial-birth abortion bill applies to a rarely used procedure and that the legislation is the result of a Republican drive to "intrude, to intercept, to intervene in the difficult and painful decisions made mostly by young, unmarried women." The fact is that the National Coalition of Abortion Providers estimates that this procedure is used 3,000 to 5,000 times annually. So to call it rare is misleading at best.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2003
THE REPORT was issued at the White House 20 years ago this Saturday, and it roiled the waters of education just as had the launch of Sputnik a quarter-century earlier. The effect was intended. A Nation at Risk, the report of President Ronald Reagan's National Commission on Excellence in Education, spelled out the dire condition of schooling in the United States in only 36 pages (plus appendices) of crisp, alarmist prose. America's educational foundations "are presently being eroded by a rising tide of mediocrity," the report said in its famous first paragraph.
NEWS
By Richard P. Doran | June 9, 2003
I ONCE read about a torturer using a very sharp scalpel to make a thousand little cuts on his subject. The result was a slow death because of massive blood loss. As executive director of Community Assistance Network Inc. (CAN), a nonprofit community action agency based in Dundalk, I in essence run a small business with a payroll to meet and a clientele, who are low-income earners to whom we provide services. My stockholders are you, the community, even if you don't realize it. The further we progress into the year, the more I'm struck by the notion that many nonprofit agencies and the low-income clients we serve are subjects of a similar torture.
NEWS
October 19, 2003
Backing choice at the expense of living babies In the editorial "Ebb tide?" (Oct. 14), The Sun claims that the partial-birth abortion bill applies to a rarely used procedure and that the legislation is the result of a Republican drive to "intrude, to intercept, to intervene in the difficult and painful decisions made mostly by young, unmarried women." The fact is that the National Coalition of Abortion Providers estimates that this procedure is used 3,000 to 5,000 times annually. So to call it rare is misleading at best.
NEWS
By Richard P. Doran | June 9, 2003
I ONCE read about a torturer using a very sharp scalpel to make a thousand little cuts on his subject. The result was a slow death because of massive blood loss. As executive director of Community Assistance Network Inc. (CAN), a nonprofit community action agency based in Dundalk, I in essence run a small business with a payroll to meet and a clientele, who are low-income earners to whom we provide services. My stockholders are you, the community, even if you don't realize it. The further we progress into the year, the more I'm struck by the notion that many nonprofit agencies and the low-income clients we serve are subjects of a similar torture.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2003
THE REPORT was issued at the White House 20 years ago this Saturday, and it roiled the waters of education just as had the launch of Sputnik a quarter-century earlier. The effect was intended. A Nation at Risk, the report of President Ronald Reagan's National Commission on Excellence in Education, spelled out the dire condition of schooling in the United States in only 36 pages (plus appendices) of crisp, alarmist prose. America's educational foundations "are presently being eroded by a rising tide of mediocrity," the report said in its famous first paragraph.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2002
MY PERFECT weekend getaway on the bay involved a kayak, a bicycle and a tent. Fine to the first two, said my friend, but did I have something against hot showers at night after sweating all day? And would breakfast without gnats be possible? So we recently took advantage of an attribute of the bay region's geography that lends itself beautifully to combining outdoor exercise with bed-and-breakfast luxury. By paddle and pedal, we did a daylong loop through a lovely, lonely section of the Eastern Shore - returning almost to where we began without retracing our route.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 11, 1997
THE PRIEST at Phil Dypsky's funeral yesterday morning began with these words: "The souls of the just are in the hands of God." But, with so many echoes in the sanctuary of St. Casimir's Church -- and truck noise from O'Donnell Street outside -- I heard what the priest said as, "The souls of the jester in the hands of God."Either way, it fit.Phil Dypsky, who died at 83 this week (see obituary, Page 5B) made a lot of people laugh, mostly with gags about himself, and starting with his toupee.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 31, 1995
I have always thought of Herman Maril as an abstract artist -- not in the usual sense of non-representational, but in the dictionary sense of making an abstract, epitomizing or summarizing. The fine exhibit of Maril's work currently at St. John's College in Annapolis only confirms that opinion.Maril (1908-1986) was a Baltimorean whose career spanned six decades, from the late 1920s to his death. The show's 49 paintings and drawings give us as true a picture of Maril's art as we're likely to get, thanks to curator David Scott, an art historian and former director of the National Museum of American Art. He concentrates on a group of major paintings from Maril's later years, when his style was fully developed, but also includes early works and drawings.
NEWS
October 14, 2003
A DECADE ago, shortly after Democrats last captured the White House along with both houses of Congress, the abortion rights movement hit its high water mark. President Bill Clinton revoked Republican executive orders that placed regulatory restrictions on the margins of abortion services. And advocates who had battled for 20 years to prevent Congress from unraveling rights extended by the 1973 Supreme Court decision in Roe vs. Wade sought to finally settle the issue by formally writing those protections into law. The tide has now turned almost completely.
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