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Eazy E

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NEWS
By Derrick Z. Jackson | April 17, 1995
ON HIS DEATHBED, he received 100 telephone calls per hour. More operators had to be hired to handle the load. "We've never had this number of calls, even when Lucille Ball was here, Kirk Douglas or George Burns," said Paula Correia, spokeswoman for Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. "Never anything like this, ever."One person who visited the dying man said: "It's a real shame. I went to the hospital and saw him, but he was unconscious. He didn't even know I was in the room. It wasn't a pretty sight, man. It was sad . . . I think it's terrible that this happened.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2005
Sometime in the early '70s, members of the funk band WAR were jamming in a warehouse at Hill and Lemon streets in Long Beach, Calif. Their audience was a ragtag pack of little kids, some of whom would later lay down beats of their own. Dr. Dre and Eazy-E -- both boys back then -- were there, band leader Lonnie Jordan recalls. As WAR kept touring -- they headline the International Festival this weekend -- these rappers grew up and shared what they learned in Long Beach with the world. Eazy-E's sample of WAR's "Slipping Into Darkness" in "Sippin' on a 40" was one way a new generation felt the funk.
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FEATURES
By Chuck Philips and Chuck Philips,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 9, 1993
Eazy-E, the controversial Los Angeles rapper once accused of advocating violence against police officers, confirms that he believes in the innocence of one of the four officers on trial in the Rodney King case -- shocking some members of the rap community."
NEWS
By Rosemary Harris | November 16, 1997
Who remembers Eric Wright?Who remembers that swagger? That Jheri-Curl? That AK-47 he used in his publicity shots?Who remembers that rapper who made a name rhyming about his "ruthless" Compton, Calif., lifestyle - about wild women, 40-ounce bottles of St. Ides malt liquor and shootouts with high-caliber weapons?Who remembers how Eric Wright, more popularly known as "Eazy-E" of the gangsta rap quintet N.W.A., died?On March 26, 1995, at age 31, Eric Wright died from complications of the AIDS virus.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 17, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- Rap artist Eazy-E, a founding member of the group N.W.A. and a major figure in the commercial development of "gangsta" rap, has AIDS.Eazy-E, whose real name is Eric Wright, was in critical condition yesterday in the intensive care ward of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, said hospital spokeswoman Paula Correia.Eazy-E is one of the first major music performers to announce he has AIDS. Health experts and AIDS activists said his declaration forces the public to again confront the danger of AIDS.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 28, 1995
"To live fast and die young" is often cited as the ultimate hard-guy credo, but it would be hard to imagine the tough who'd want to die young the way Eazy-E did.Born Eric Wright 31 years ago, the gangsta rap star died of AIDS on Sunday, four weeks after checking into the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles with what he assumed to be asthma. He left a wife, six children and a lot of questions.To say that his sudden death was a shock to the hip-hop community would be an understatement.
NEWS
By Frank Rich | June 13, 1995
New York -- SOME SKEPTICS have speculated that Bob Dole, savior of America's children, had never heard of gangsta rap until someone told him it might come in handy in his presidential campaign. But they would be wrong.Senator Dole's involvement with this music actually dates back four years. In 1991, both he and his current rival for the hearts of Christian Coalition voters, Sen. Phil Gramm, rolled out the Washington welcome mat for Eazy-E, of the then-pre-eminent gangsta rap group NWA (Niggaz Wit' Attitude)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2005
Sometime in the early '70s, members of the funk band WAR were jamming in a warehouse at Hill and Lemon streets in Long Beach, Calif. Their audience was a ragtag pack of little kids, some of whom would later lay down beats of their own. Dr. Dre and Eazy-E -- both boys back then -- were there, band leader Lonnie Jordan recalls. As WAR kept touring -- they headline the International Festival this weekend -- these rappers grew up and shared what they learned in Long Beach with the world. Eazy-E's sample of WAR's "Slipping Into Darkness" in "Sippin' on a 40" was one way a new generation felt the funk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | October 29, 1993
WORLD GONE WRONGBob Dylan (Columbia 57590) In some ways, the most interesting thing about Bob Dylan's "World Gone Wrong" isn't the way he recasts folk classics like "Two Soldiers" and "Delia," but the way he describes the songs in his liner notes. After all, it's one thing to hear him stomp through the ragtime rhythms of "Stack-a-Lee," something else entirely to read that Stack "is not some egotistical degraded existentialist dionysian idiot," and that "the Authentic alternative lifestyle [is]
NEWS
By Rosemary Harris | November 16, 1997
Who remembers Eric Wright?Who remembers that swagger? That Jheri-Curl? That AK-47 he used in his publicity shots?Who remembers that rapper who made a name rhyming about his "ruthless" Compton, Calif., lifestyle - about wild women, 40-ounce bottles of St. Ides malt liquor and shootouts with high-caliber weapons?Who remembers how Eric Wright, more popularly known as "Eazy-E" of the gangsta rap quintet N.W.A., died?On March 26, 1995, at age 31, Eric Wright died from complications of the AIDS virus.
NEWS
By Frank Rich | June 13, 1995
New York -- SOME SKEPTICS have speculated that Bob Dole, savior of America's children, had never heard of gangsta rap until someone told him it might come in handy in his presidential campaign. But they would be wrong.Senator Dole's involvement with this music actually dates back four years. In 1991, both he and his current rival for the hearts of Christian Coalition voters, Sen. Phil Gramm, rolled out the Washington welcome mat for Eazy-E, of the then-pre-eminent gangsta rap group NWA (Niggaz Wit' Attitude)
NEWS
By Derrick Z. Jackson | April 17, 1995
ON HIS DEATHBED, he received 100 telephone calls per hour. More operators had to be hired to handle the load. "We've never had this number of calls, even when Lucille Ball was here, Kirk Douglas or George Burns," said Paula Correia, spokeswoman for Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. "Never anything like this, ever."One person who visited the dying man said: "It's a real shame. I went to the hospital and saw him, but he was unconscious. He didn't even know I was in the room. It wasn't a pretty sight, man. It was sad . . . I think it's terrible that this happened.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 28, 1995
"To live fast and die young" is often cited as the ultimate hard-guy credo, but it would be hard to imagine the tough who'd want to die young the way Eazy-E did.Born Eric Wright 31 years ago, the gangsta rap star died of AIDS on Sunday, four weeks after checking into the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles with what he assumed to be asthma. He left a wife, six children and a lot of questions.To say that his sudden death was a shock to the hip-hop community would be an understatement.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 17, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- Rap artist Eazy-E, a founding member of the group N.W.A. and a major figure in the commercial development of "gangsta" rap, has AIDS.Eazy-E, whose real name is Eric Wright, was in critical condition yesterday in the intensive care ward of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, said hospital spokeswoman Paula Correia.Eazy-E is one of the first major music performers to announce he has AIDS. Health experts and AIDS activists said his declaration forces the public to again confront the danger of AIDS.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | October 29, 1993
WORLD GONE WRONGBob Dylan (Columbia 57590) In some ways, the most interesting thing about Bob Dylan's "World Gone Wrong" isn't the way he recasts folk classics like "Two Soldiers" and "Delia," but the way he describes the songs in his liner notes. After all, it's one thing to hear him stomp through the ragtime rhythms of "Stack-a-Lee," something else entirely to read that Stack "is not some egotistical degraded existentialist dionysian idiot," and that "the Authentic alternative lifestyle [is]
FEATURES
By Chuck Philips and Chuck Philips,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 9, 1993
Eazy-E, the controversial Los Angeles rapper once accused of advocating violence against police officers, confirms that he believes in the innocence of one of the four officers on trial in the Rodney King case -- shocking some members of the rap community."
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 21, 1996
Originally, gangsta rap was all about attitude. It was about acting tough and living large, playing off ghetto stereotypes to come on like the baddest mothers ever to walk into a recording studio.Sure, some gangsta rappers originally were gangbangers. Eric "Eazy-E" Wright admitted to having pimped and dealt drugs before turning to the music business, and Ice-T has alluded to even darker doings during his gang period. But gang life wasn't a part of their rap career; it was just an image, and an attractive one at that.
NEWS
April 5, 1995
Less SmokeEven with exemptions from the compromise bill announced March 28, Maryland has taken a giant step toward safer work places free of involuntary exposure to second hand smoke. Gov. Parris Glendening came out smelling like a rose. He demonstrated real leadership by taking a position that was not politically easy -- because it was the right thing to do.We know the governor got the best deal he could from this General Assembly, which threatened a veto override.Marylanders are upset with legislators, primarily because they insisted on including restaurants among the list of exemptions to the smoking regulation.
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