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By New York Times News Service | October 19, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Senate Intelligence Committee met late yesterday to review proposed compromise legislation that would strengthen court oversight of eavesdropping on Americans while granting telephone and Internet companies legal immunity for their role in assisting government surveillance programs since 2001. Sen. Jay Rockefeller of West Virginia, the Democratic chairman, and Sen. Christopher S. Bond of Missouri, the Republican vice chairman, reached a tentative agreement Wednesday on the compromise measure.
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NEWS
By Ray McGovern | July 8, 2013
There is a way out for President Barack Obama as he attempts to cope with Edward Snowden's disclosures about the National Security Agency's overreaching eavesdropping, the turbulent world reaction, and the lack of truthfulness shown by National Intelligence Director James Clapper and NSA Director Keith Alexander. The President should seize the initiative by suggesting to both that they "spend more time with their families. " Not since President George W. Bush attacked Iraq has there been so much discontent among our closest allies with U.S. behavior.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 14, 2006
WASHINGTON --The Senate Judiciary Committee endorsed a bill yesterday backed by the White House that would have a secret court review the constitutionality of the Bush administration's eavesdropping program. By a party-line vote of 10-8, the committee sent the bill to the Senate floor, where a vote could come next week. The bill embodies an agreement reached by President Bush and the committee chairman, Republican Sen. Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, under which the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court would review the eavesdropping program.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
A Maryland Transit Administration decision to record the conversations of bus drivers and passengers to investigate crimes, accidents and poor customer service has come under attack from privacy advocates and state lawmakers who say it may go too far. The first 10 buses - marked with signs to alert passengers to the open microphones - began service this week in Baltimore, and officials expect to expand that to 340 buses, about half the fleet, by...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 2005
WASHINGTON --Former Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said yesterday that it would not have been "that hard" for President Bush to have obtained warrants for eavesdropping on domestic telephone and Internet activity but that he saw "nothing wrong" with the decision not to do so. "My own judgment is that it didn't seem to me, anyway, that it would have been that hard to go get the warrants," Powell said. "And even in the case of an emergency, you go and do it. The law provides for that."
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Matthew Hay Brown and Bradley Olson and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporters | June 20, 2008
WASHINGTON - The White House and senior members of Congress reached a deal yesterday on a long-stalled overhaul of the nation's eavesdropping laws, leaving in place a controversial provision that largely protects telecommunications companies from liability for their roles in past information gathering. The proposal - the most significant revision of the nation's intelligence laws in 30 years - in many ways mirrors the warrantless wiretapping program President Bush secretly began using shortly after the Sept.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 25, 2005
WASHINGTON --Congressional officials said yesterday that they wanted to investigate the disclosure that the National Security Agency had gained access to some of the country's main telephone arteries to glean data on possible terrorists. "As far as congressional investigations are concerned, said Sen. Patrick J. Leahy of Vermont, the ranking Democrat on the Judiciary Committee, "these new revelations can only multiply and intensify the growing list of questions and concerns about the warrantless surveillance of Americans.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,Los Angeles Times | October 10, 2008
WASHINGTON - U.S. intelligence analysts eavesdropped on personal calls between Americans overseas and their families back home and monitored the communications of workers with the Red Cross and other humanitarian organizations, according to U.S. military linguists involved in U.S. surveillance programs. The accounts are the most detailed to date to challenge the assertions of President Bush, CIA Director Michael V. Hayden and other administration officials that the United States' controversial overseas wiretapping activities have been carefully monitored to prevent abuse and invasion of U.S. citizens' privacy.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2003
After three years of growing frustration with the National Security Agency's bookkeeping, Congress has voted to take away the NSA's power to sign multimillion-dollar deals with contractors helping the agency modernize. The extraordinary measure shifts power over hundreds of millions of dollars in technology contracts from the NSA's Fort Meade headquarters to the Pentagon, where they would be subject to accounting procedures that lawmakers say are lacking at the global eavesdropping agency.
NEWS
By SIOBHAN GORMAN and SIOBHAN GORMAN,SUN REPORTER | July 27, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Stoking the debate over the National Security Agency's warrantless domestic surveillance program, the directors of two key intelligence agencies argued yesterday in favor of a measure that would give the government new eavesdropping authority. Democrats criticized the plan, brokered by the White House and Senate Judiciary Chairman Arlen Specter, as a "sham proposal" and a "blank check" for the federal government to spy on Americans. The proposal would authorize a secret court to review the existing NSA program and amend a 1978 law to expand government surveillance authority.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2010
The local java joint or airport terminal might seem like the perfect location to log onto Facebook or troll Amazon for a deal. But for anyone who has accepted the convenience of unsecured Internet access, here's another reminder to be cautious about what information you share online. When you use a wireless network — or even many wired ones — your communications are sent to every other computer on the network, said Seth Schoen, senior staff technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a nonprofit group that defends civil rights in the digital world.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,paul.west@baltsun.com | April 17, 2009
Washington -Congress is investigating a "serious" failure by the National Security Agency to comply with legal limits on its domestic eavesdropping activities, key lawmakers said Thursday. An internal review by the Justice Department and the NSA found that the spy agency's monitoring program had exceeded limits set by Congress last year designed to protect the privacy of U.S. citizens. The Justice Department said that steps have been taken to correct the problem, discovered as the Obama administration was preparing to seek renewal of the surveillance program.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,Los Angeles Times | October 10, 2008
WASHINGTON - U.S. intelligence analysts eavesdropped on personal calls between Americans overseas and their families back home and monitored the communications of workers with the Red Cross and other humanitarian organizations, according to U.S. military linguists involved in U.S. surveillance programs. The accounts are the most detailed to date to challenge the assertions of President Bush, CIA Director Michael V. Hayden and other administration officials that the United States' controversial overseas wiretapping activities have been carefully monitored to prevent abuse and invasion of U.S. citizens' privacy.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Matthew Hay Brown and Bradley Olson and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporters | June 20, 2008
WASHINGTON - The White House and senior members of Congress reached a deal yesterday on a long-stalled overhaul of the nation's eavesdropping laws, leaving in place a controversial provision that largely protects telecommunications companies from liability for their roles in past information gathering. The proposal - the most significant revision of the nation's intelligence laws in 30 years - in many ways mirrors the warrantless wiretapping program President Bush secretly began using shortly after the Sept.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 30, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The National Security Agency's eavesdropping program sparked heated legal concerns and silent protests inside the Bush administration within hours of its adoption in October 2001, according to current and former government officials. In making its case to Congress for broadened spy powers, the White House has emphasized the firm legal foundations of the program conducted after the Sept. 11 attacks. It has even taken the unusual step of giving lawmakers access to classified presidential orders from 2001 and early legal opinions to try to show that the program was on sound legal footing from the start.
NEWS
By James Oliphant and James Oliphant,Chicago Tribune | February 13, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The Senate rejected Democratic attempts yesterday to scale back expansion of the government's powers to monitor phone calls and e-mail as part of its efforts to fight terrorism. Senators also voted to immunize telecommunications companies from lawsuits for their role in aiding the government's warrantless eavesdropping program. The bill, comprising amendments to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, now goes to the House for a potential showdown. The House version offers no protection for the telecom industry and more restrictions on government power.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2004
The British government yesterday dropped all charges against a British intelligence officer who leaked a National Security Agency memo ordering stepped-up eavesdropping at the United Nations in the weeks before the United States invaded Iraq last year. Katharine Gun, a 29-year-old Chinese linguist at the British eavesdropping agency Government Communications Headquarters, had publicly admitted that she was the source of the classified document, which gave a rare inside look at the NSA's targeting of friendly countries.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 10, 2006
WASHINGTON --The Justice Department held an unusual closed-door briefing yesterday for judges on a secret foreign-intelligence court in response to concerns about President Bush's decision to allow domestic eavesdropping without warrants. A number of judges from around the country who serve on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which issues eavesdropping warrants in terror cases, flew to Washington to hear the administration's defense of the legality and use of the program, officials said.
NEWS
By Richard B. Schmitt and Richard B. Schmitt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 14, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department revealed yesterday that it has reopened an internal investigation into whether department lawyers acted unethically or illegally in connection with the government's warrantless electronic surveillance of terror suspects. The internal probe was suspended last year after President Bush refused to grant security clearances so investigators could interview Justice officials and others about the National Security Agency program. White House officials said then that Bush viewed the request for the clearances as a security risk because it widened the circle of individuals familiar with the highly classified program.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 19, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Senate Intelligence Committee met late yesterday to review proposed compromise legislation that would strengthen court oversight of eavesdropping on Americans while granting telephone and Internet companies legal immunity for their role in assisting government surveillance programs since 2001. Sen. Jay Rockefeller of West Virginia, the Democratic chairman, and Sen. Christopher S. Bond of Missouri, the Republican vice chairman, reached a tentative agreement Wednesday on the compromise measure.
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