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By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
Less than a week after Courtney Upshaw acknowledged that he weighed 285 pounds, Ravens coach John Harbaugh said that the second-year linebacker has to improve his eating habits in order to reach his full potential. "Courtney's weight issue - [and] he does need to lose some pounds - is that  he doesn't eat right,"  Harbaugh said today following the Ravens' organized team activity. "Courtney eats too much and he doesn't eat all of the right foods. He knows that and that's something he's going to have to get a handle on or he's not going to be the best that he can be. " For the second year in a row, Upshaw reported to offseason workouts and immediately faced questions about his playing shape.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
Less than a week after Courtney Upshaw acknowledged that he weighed 285 pounds, Ravens coach John Harbaugh said that the second-year linebacker has to improve his eating habits in order to reach his full potential. "Courtney's weight issue - [and] he does need to lose some pounds - is that  he doesn't eat right,"  Harbaugh said today following the Ravens' organized team activity. "Courtney eats too much and he doesn't eat all of the right foods. He knows that and that's something he's going to have to get a handle on or he's not going to be the best that he can be. " For the second year in a row, Upshaw reported to offseason workouts and immediately faced questions about his playing shape.
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NEWS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff Writer | November 21, 1990
Cheryl Metzger is showing student-athletes at Old Mill High how to have their cake and eat it too, albeit without the sugar-laden icing.Senior Pam Williams, a cross country runner who eats three meals a day, has lost 3 pounds since her September enrollment in Metzger's Sports Nutrition class. She didn't even have to give up pizza, one of her favorite dishes, and still gobbles between-meal snacks."I still eat all day long," she says. "I'm not the kind of person who can stick to the standard of just three meals a day."
EXPLORE
December 19, 2012
Perhaps government banning of sugary drinks oversteps. It is a meaningful effort to reduce the burden of obesity on everyone. One thing that has stood out in the debate over health care reform is repeated statements from health care consumers that they do not want to pay for the other guy's health problems. There is one sure way to get consumers on board with changes in habits and consumption and to take more responsibility in their lifestyle choices. Through the wallet. How about higher co-payments for folks whose BMI, which does not lie, is over the recommended goal?
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 21, 2002
IF YOU WANT to persuade 8- and 9-year olds to eat foods that are good for them, what can you do, short of taking out an ad on Nickelodeon? You might follow the example of the county Health Department and take your message directly to the schools. The department's message to third-graders about eating right comes in the form of a food tasting the department calls "Fruity Tooty Veggie Weggie Try It Day." Before the tastings began this school year, more than 2,600 county public school third-graders had participated during the past four years in classroom presentations on healthy eating and physical activity, which were sponsored by the Health Department and assisted by the school nurse program.
FEATURES
By Kim Pierce and Kim Pierce,Universal Press Syndicate | October 12, 1994
From TV ads to eye-level store displays, kids get the message to buy and eat high-fat, sugar, processed foods -- not exactly the building blocks of good nutrition.And although government, consumer groups and the food and TV industries have begun looking at ways to channel more nutrition information to kids, most experts agree parents are still the food gatekeepers -- at home, at stores, in restaurants.Good -- or poor -- nutrition and eating habits form early, they say. Lifetime habits are set by age 12. And parents play a big role in establishing good habits.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | September 14, 2003
I want my children to develop better eating habits (less fast food and sugar, more fresh fruit and vegetables), but it's an expensive and time-consuming change. Any suggestions for a working mother on a budget? Dr. Katherine Battle Horgen, a consultant for the Yale Center for Eating and Weight Disorders and co-author of Food Fight, a new book addressing the Amer-ican obesity epidemic, offers these suggestions. To save money, take advantage of seasonal discounts on produce and freeze what you don't eat for later use as fruit smoothies or vegetable purees.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1995
Last May, Naval Academy officials worried that eating disorders were widespread among women in the brigade of midshipmen. Yesterday, they said that only a few midshipmen have eating disorders, although some have poor eating habits that could lead to anorexia or bulimia.A survey taken in May found that about 11 percent of the women and 3.5 percent of the men have "disordered eating behaviors," which include severe dieting, fasting and becoming a vegetarian, said Capt. Tom Jurkowsky, an academy spokesman.
NEWS
August 6, 1992
Here's a scary statistic to chew on: Children in the United States, on average, get about half their daily calories from fat. That's much more than the federal recommendation for fat intake in most diets. Even that 30 percent guideline is considered too generous by some nutrition experts.The Washington-based Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), a non-profit organization serving as a watchdog of the food industry, has published a new report contending that American kids are in flabby shape because their diets contain too many fatty meats and snacks, sugar-laden breakfast cereals and other processed foods.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | May 18, 1993
"We're all customers for cancer -- no one has an advantage," according to Michael Simic, an oncology researcher from the University Pennsylvania School of Medicine.Dr. Simic was the moderator of a Roundtable Discussion on Nutritional Strategies to Prevent Cancer, part of a weeklong international seminar on cancer prevention held here in late April.The roundtable was designed to help figure out how each of us can use research information to reduce our cancer risks.Clearly, improved eating habits would be a big step.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
At Linden Market in Reservoir Hill, shelves are heaped high with miniature pies, cupcakes, and candy. Three dozen flavors of salty snacks burst from cardboard boxes. Around the corner at the Whitelock Community Farm, deep green leaves of chard fan from raised beds, cucumber vines wind up trellises and Japanese eggplants resembling glossy purple commas dangle from stalks. Beginning this week, the corner store and the farm, which are just a couple of blocks apart, will forge an unlikely partnership.
HEALTH
By Rachel Ernzen, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. This week, Rachel Ernzen weighs in on bad habits. Information about the relationship between food and health abounds in newspapers, magazines, books, TV and Internet. Foods have become more readily available and portion sizes have grown, but we lead more sedentary daily lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
Karen Clark gets to the office by 6 a.m. and eats breakfast at her desk a few hours later, when most of her colleagues are arriving for the day. That's when the comments start. "Eeew, you're eating that for breakfast?!!" Clark enjoys dinner food for breakfast. Her most important meal of the day is usually last night's leftovers. Steak. Spaghetti. Fried fish. If you're thinking that's none of your business, Clark couldn't agree more. She believes her eating habits shouldn't concern her co-workers at a Baltimore financial services firm either.
NEWS
July 20, 2008
City's violence strains its health As an occupational therapist new to Baltimore, I was pleased to see David Kohn's article that addressed the link between environment and health outcomes ("Violent neighborhoods are bad for your health," July 17). Since arriving in Baltimore, I've been providing home care services largely in traditionally violent West Baltimore neighborhoods. And I've been astonished to see that the average age of my patients here has dropped more than 20 years from that of the patients I've seen doing similar work in other cities; instead of patients in their 70s and 80s, I'm seeing patients as young their early 40s and 50s faced with chronic conditions such as heart disease and stroke.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | August 19, 2007
The children in this clinic have an unhealthy relationship with food. They drink too much juice and eat too much junk. One patient would eat only madeleine cookies; another roamed the grocery store aisles each morning to choose his breakfast -- chocolate-covered pretzels being a favorite. But the kids treated by Dr. Maureen Black aren't part of the obesity epidemic that has swept up as many as 18 percent of U.S. children. They are on the opposite end of the scale, the end that doesn't get the attention.
NEWS
By Melissa Healy and Melissa Healy,Los ANgeles Times | January 12, 2007
Kids! It's not bad enough that they leave their clothes on the floor, cost you a fortune and drive you crazy with worry. They also may be making you fat. So says a study appearing in the Jan. 4 online edition of the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. Compared with adults living without children in the home, adults living with kids younger than 17, on average, take in an additional 4.9 grams of fat daily. And 1.7 grams of that additional fat is saturated fat - the artery-clogging kind of fat that abounds in many meat and dairy products, processed foods and meals taken out from fast-food joints and eaten in restaurants.
NEWS
March 23, 1992
Writing in the New York Times recently, Molly O'Neill explaned why salsa's replacement of ketchup as the king of American condiments takes on more importance than the usual marketing statistic:"Epicures and food historians view the topping of ketchup as the manifest destiny of good taste. Ketchup, that sugar-sweetened complemnet to fried food and meat, symbolizes 'the bland old British-based American diet,' said Elizabeth Rozin, a specialist in ethnic food. The Mexican-inspired salsa is an uncoked relish fired by chili peppers that appeals, she said, "to cosmopoltan tastes.
NEWS
By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,Public Editor | October 22, 2006
The publisher and editors at The Sun spend a lot of time these days thinking about readers - what can be done to keep them and what can be done to bring in new ones. Newspaper executives are worried because circulation figures have declined. When former subscribers are asked why they left, the majority say they are simply too busy to read. With that disconcerting situation in mind, The Sun recently launched an array of new features designed to connect with readers in personal ways - regular stories about nutrition, consumer issues, commuting, neighborhood problems and getting older.
NEWS
By ROBIN MATHER JENKINS and ROBIN MATHER JENKINS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 28, 2006
Harry Balzer has staked his career on something he himself doesn't take very seriously. He's not a foodie. "I just eat to live," he said, unreeling his 6-foot-4-inch frame into a kitchen chair in his home in North Barrington, Ill. "It's never been about the food for me. It's about the information." Now, information: That, Balzer takes very seriously. He is a vice president at NPD, a company that provides statistical information on how people behave. In Balzer's case, those statistics, delivered to clients worldwide, reflect how - and what and why - Americans eat. "There are 300 million of us in this country now," Balzer said.
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