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HEALTH
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2010
Juli Babbitt, a 26-year-old recovering anorexic living in Columbia, often found herself visiting a website featuring pictures of rail-thin models with protruding rib bones, and providing purging techniques, at the height of her eating disorder. "I remember visiting [the website] numerous times as a way to keep my head focused on staying thin," she said. "It wasn't until during my treatment that I realized how damaging these websites are. The promotion of anorexia as a lifestyle choice instead of a mental disorder is incredibly dangerous to individuals who suffer from eating disorders.
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HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | August 9, 2012
Celebrity psychologist Dr. Drew Pinsky recently admitted on CNN to exercising obsessively to stay slim, a condition not technically a mental disorder, but what some call exercise bulimia. He joked about his condition saying: “a little whiff of a mental health issue never hurt anybody.” Doctors at The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt in Baltimore  found the comment disturbing. They say that calling exercise bulimia a “mild” mental health disorder sends the wrong message to the public.
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FEATURES
By Jennifer Brennan and Jennifer Brennan,Contributing Writer | February 1, 1995
Alicia Quintano still recalls the chilling sight in a Jersey shore coffee shop -- a woman so emaciated that her "shoulder blades stuck out from her back like chicken wings." Ms. Quintano never imagined that, just one year later, at age 14 and 5-foot-2, she would weigh only 68 pounds herself.A storyteller and modern bard, Ms. Quintano now travels across the country, visiting clubs, coffee houses and college campuses, where she delivers her witty dramatic monologue, "Escape from Fosdick," and shares her struggle for identity and personal TC power following a bad relationship with a man of that name.
EXPLORE
May 24, 2012
These groups meet regularly. Abusive relationships - Mondays, 7-8:30 p.m. Domestic Violence Center of Howard County, 5457 Twin Knolls Road, Suite 310, Columbia. Free child care. 410-997-0304. Adult Children of Alcoholics - Wednesdays, 7 p.m., First Presbyterian Church of Howard County, 9325 Presbyterian Circle, Columbia; Saturdays, 12:45 p.m., Serenity Center, 9650 Basket Ring Road, Columbia. 410-796-4680. Alcoholics Anonymous - Sundays, 7 p.m. Share experience, strength and hope with each other to solve this common problem and help others to recover.
SPORTS
By Lori Van Lonkhuyzen and Lori Van Lonkhuyzen,Sun Staff Writer | July 29, 1994
In the wake of former gymnast Christy Henrich's death, questions have been raised about the pressures put on young athletes -- gymnasts in particular -- to lose weight.Henrich died Tuesday night of "multiple organ system failure," complications from her bouts with the eating disorders anorexia nervosa and bulimia. She was 22.Henrich, who missed making the 1988 U.S. Olympic team by .118 of a point, became concerned about her weight in 1988 when, at a meet in Hungary, she overheard a judge say that she was too fat to make the Olympic team.
NEWS
February 19, 2006
Bodiography, a contemporary ballet company dedicated to the awareness of eating disorders, will give a performance for the finale of McDaniel College's National Eating Disorder Awareness Week at 7:30 p.m. Saturday in the Carroll Arts Center, 91 W. Main St., Westminster. The troupe will dance to the music of the Dave Matthews Band, Pearl Jam and Smashing Pumpkins, and will preview some never-before-seen pieces. Tickets are free for McDaniel College students and faculty, $5 for general admission.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1996
St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson opened a new Center for Eating Disorders yesterday. Its director is Dr. Harry Brandt, who has run a similar program at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore since 1989.The new program is housed in the psychiatry department, which has undergone $2 million in renovations and construction. Brandt also will head that department.The center will have seven beds for inpatients, who are expected to stay an average of 10 days each, according to Dr. Steve Crawford, associate director.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1996
Although anyone can develop an eating disorder, females between the ages of 12 and 35 are the most vulnerable, according to Angela Guarda, assistant director of the Eating and Weight Disorders Program at Johns Hopkins Hospital.In addition to often causing severe mental depression, eating disorders can lead to dangerous medical conditions. Anorexics lose bone density, which makes them more vulnerable to fractures, Dr. Guarda says. Some develop cardiomyopathy, which weakens the heart muscles, or potentially lethal heart arrhythmias.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Staff Writer | July 7, 1992
Summer to Kirsten means one thing: Ice cream, and lots of it.It's true that she only thinks about ice cream now, and not nearly as often as she used to.But Kirsten has eaten plenty of ice cream. "I couldn't go out with my friends and eat one ice cream," says the 22-year-old senior at a Baltimore college. "I'd have maybe five," but not with her friends. When Kirsten ate in quantity, she did so in private, maybe while driving around in her car, she says.Kirsten says she's a compulsive eater, a binge eater.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | October 31, 2007
Last year, some Johns Hopkins University fraternity members raised the ire of other classmates by staging a "Halloween in the Hood" party, complete with "bling bling," "hoochie hoops" and a pirate hanging from a noose. Also last year, at the University of Pennsylvania, a student who was dressed as an "Arab suicide bomber" caused a major online discussion about matters of taste. This year, a sexy "Anna Rexia" costume has caused a firestorm of criticism among eating disorder experts, feminists, bloggers and others.
EXPLORE
By Steve Jones | November 18, 2011
Hesston, Ka., population 4,000, is just one small town among others on America's Midwestern plains. But the town left an indelible impression on John Windsor and Jonathan Zorn after their short stay there during a recently completed 73-day transcontinental bike trip. "It was the one town that stuck out," said Windsor, who like Zorn, is a 2007 graduate of St. Paul's School. "The people in Hesston were the nicest we met along the way. We were in a grocery store, and so many people wanted to know what we were doing.
SPORTS
By Chris Eckard, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2011
With an impending graduation and no job lined up, John Windsor sat in his apartment at St. Mary's College and listened to his old high school friend pitch him an idea of traveling across the country on a bike.' Hours later that January night, Windsor and Jonathan Zorn, classmates at St. Paul's High School, were already pinpointing their journey on a large map of the country - a trip that would take them from the wooded coastline of Oregon, through...
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2011
Jenna Miller agreed to marry her longtime boyfriend, Benjamin Woods, just months after he rescued her from near-certain death by performing CPR when she experienced a sudden cardiac arrest. But on Jan. 8, two weeks after their first wedding anniversary, her heart gave out again, and she died as Woods held her in his arms. Miller — with her fiery red hair, bright smile and plans to help others — died at age 26 of cardiac arrest brought on by a decade of binge-eating and purging.
HEALTH
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2010
Juli Babbitt, a 26-year-old recovering anorexic living in Columbia, often found herself visiting a website featuring pictures of rail-thin models with protruding rib bones, and providing purging techniques, at the height of her eating disorder. "I remember visiting [the website] numerous times as a way to keep my head focused on staying thin," she said. "It wasn't until during my treatment that I realized how damaging these websites are. The promotion of anorexia as a lifestyle choice instead of a mental disorder is incredibly dangerous to individuals who suffer from eating disorders.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,arthur.hirsch@baltsun.com | September 6, 2009
When it comes to what the therapists call "body image," Marissa Massey doesn't seem to need much bucking up. Before the question was even asked, the inmate at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women had a ready answer: "I love my body. I do." If everyone had that much confidence, Saturday's event at the prison in Jessup might not have been considered necessary. Representatives of the Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt and the Girl Scouts set up shop at the prison yesterday to continue their campaign to resist what is considered a pervasive cultural obsession with an ideal body type, usually thin and thinner.
NEWS
March 15, 2009
Centennial High School, 4300 Centennial Lane, will present the musical Damn Yankees, based on Douglass Wallop's novel, The Year the Yankees Lost the Pennant, at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, and 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday, in the school auditorium. Tickets are $8 in advance; $10 at the door. To reserve tickets and pay at the door, e-mail kcarlsen@hcpss.org by 2 p.m. Wednesday. The school's theater department will offer a Ballpark Dinner and Show package on Friday. Dinner will be served from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the cafeteria.
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN | April 14, 2006
If Your Adolescent Has an Eating Disorder: An Essential Resource for Parents By Timothy Walsh, M.D., and V.L. Cameron Oxford University Press/$9.95 It is heartbreaking to have a child with an eating disorder. But it's worse if you don't feel you have support, good information or a roadmap to recovery. This book, If Your Adolescent Has an Eating Disorder, is an excellent way to get grounded. It contains some of the best information you will find on the subject. In 2003, the nonprofit Annenberg Foundation Trust launched an Adolescent Mental Health Initiative, setting up seven commissions on mental disorders that begin between ages 10 and 22. The result: a mammoth treatise called Treating and Preventing Adolescent Mental Health Disorders (2005)
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 13, 1996
Tweezing apart the brain mechanisms that control hunger, scientists have shown that a newly discovered nerve chemical sharply reduces appetite, prompting even starved rats to turn their noses away from food.Though the experiments involved lab animals, the work by researchers at the Scripps Research Institute and the Salk Institute may partially explain the biology of human eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, in which someone who desperately needs food shuns it.The researchers speculate that sustained stress could prompt the brain to produce an excess of the chemical, called urocortin, making it easy to avoid eating.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | December 13, 2007
As the holiday season hits full swing, stress mounts, too. Let's face it, anyone who watches his weight, worries about how he looks or has issues with his family, can be susceptible to holiday-induced anxieties. But for some people - including those with bulimia nervosa - this time of year may be particularly challenging, says Dr. Harry A. Brandt, director of the Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt Health System and head of the department of psychiatry at St. Joseph Medical Center.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | October 31, 2007
Last year, some Johns Hopkins University fraternity members raised the ire of other classmates by staging a "Halloween in the Hood" party, complete with "bling bling," "hoochie hoops" and a pirate hanging from a noose. Also last year, at the University of Pennsylvania, a student who was dressed as an "Arab suicide bomber" caused a major online discussion about matters of taste. This year, a sexy "Anna Rexia" costume has caused a firestorm of criticism among eating disorder experts, feminists, bloggers and others.
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