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By Robert Manor and Robert Manor,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 21, 2005
CHICAGO - Eastman Kodak Co., an icon of photography for more than a century, said yesterday that it is shedding up to 10,000 more jobs as digital imaging devours its traditional film business at a faster-than-expected pace. Analysts say Kodak is in a race to build sales of its digital cameras and, more importantly, its photo printers and other digital supplies. Meanwhile, sales of traditional film products are plunging faster than the company's executives had forecast. The company also posted a loss for the quarter that ended June 30. Analysts had expected Kodak, still the world's largest photography company, to show a small profit.
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BUSINESS
By Robert Manor and Robert Manor,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 21, 2005
CHICAGO - Eastman Kodak Co., an icon of photography for more than a century, said yesterday that it is shedding up to 10,000 more jobs as digital imaging devours its traditional film business at a faster-than-expected pace. Analysts say Kodak is in a race to build sales of its digital cameras and, more importantly, its photo printers and other digital supplies. Meanwhile, sales of traditional film products are plunging faster than the company's executives had forecast. The company also posted a loss for the quarter that ended June 30. Analysts had expected Kodak, still the world's largest photography company, to show a small profit.
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NEWS
By Jill L. Zarend and Jill L. Zarend,Staff writer | December 17, 1991
Peggy Vick of the Salvation Army says she's is "thrilled with the response" she has gotten from the business community this holiday season."The neat thing that has happened this year is that corporations are realizing that the business sector is helping the non-profit sector," she said."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 23, 2004
ROCHESTER, N.Y. - Eastman Kodak Co., the world's biggest photography company, said demand for digital products and services is rising faster than it had expected and that more than half of its sales should come from that business by next year. Digital sales will increase at an annual rate of 36 percent from this year to 2007, Kodak said yesterday at a meeting in New York with investors. The Rochester, N.Y., company had projected annual growth of 26 percent from 2002 and 2006. Total revenue should increase by 7 percent to 8 percent from this year to 2007 as waning demand for film limits gains made in digital markets, Kodak said.
BUSINESS
By Opinions on stocks offered by investment experts. Compiled by Steve Halpern for Knight Ridder | November 27, 1991
Eastman Kodak"After foundering for several years, Eastman Kodak's (EK, NYSE, around $46) latest restructuring seems to be taking hold," says Wellesley, Mass.-based United & Babson Investment Report."Management is determined to turn the company around. We expect the restructuring to have a positive effect on future earnings. The company should post strong profit gains next year as the economy accelerates. The stock is now yields over 4 percent. Based on historical evaluations, the issue appears very attractive."
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 18, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court moved yesterday into a major legal dispute in the competitive business equipment industry, agreeing to explore the impact of antitrust laws on the market for servicing copiers, computers and other high-tech machines.The specific issue, raised in an appeal by Eastman Kodak Co., is whether a manufacturer of machines may refuse legally to sell replacement parts to companies that compete with it in servicing its machines.Kodak is seeking to head off the trial of an antitrust lawsuit against it by 18 companies, located in 10 states, which compete directly with Kodak in servicing Kodak copying and microfilming machines.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 22, 2004
NEW YORK - Eastman Kodak Co., the world's biggest photography company, reported yesterday that its second-quarter net income rose 38 percent as sales of digital cameras increased and Chief Executive Officer Daniel Carp cut costs. The company's shares jumped 9.1 percent, their biggest daily gain in six months. Profit rose to $154 million or 54 cents a share, from $112 million, or 39 cents, a year earlier, Carp said. Profit, excluding the costs of job cuts and plant closures, was 88 cents a share, higher than the company's April forecast of 55 cents to 65 cents.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 23, 2003
ROCHESTER, N.Y. - Eastman Kodak Co. will eliminate as many as 2,200 jobs as the slumping economy and consumers' shift to digital cameras hurts sales and profit at the biggest filmmaker. Kodak's stock yesterday had its biggest drop in 16 months. Costs to fire workers will total as much as $100 million this year, Kodak said. Job cuts helped the company rebound to a profit in the fourth quarter, though results fell short of analysts' forecasts. The company said this quarter's profit will be about 13 cents a share, less than half the 28-cent average estimate of analysts in a Thomson First Call survey.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 16, 1998
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks were mixed yesterday, as the Nasdaq composite index set its sixth straight record after bullish sales forecast by Intel Corp.Investors bought Eastman Kodak Co. and other companies that topped earnings estimates, and punished Caterpillar Inc. and Whirlpool Corp. for falling short.The Nasdaq soared 26.13, or 1.3 percent, to 1994.54. The index, packed with computer companies, is up 27 percent this year.The Dow Jones industrial average fell 11.07 to 9,234.47 after topping 9,300 for the first time, and the Standard & Poor's 500 index fell 2.77 to 1,174.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 2, 2003
ROCHESTER, N.Y. - Eastman Kodak Co., the biggest maker of film for movies, agreed to buy Laser-Pacific Media Corp., a Hollywood photography-services company, for $30.5 million to expand its digital services for the entertainment industry. Kodak will pay $4.22 a share in stock or cash, 37 percent more than Laser-Pacific's closing price yesterday. Laser-Pacific provides editing and other post-production services for film and television and had $31.8 million in sales last year, Kodak said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 22, 2004
NEW YORK - Eastman Kodak Co., the world's biggest photography company, reported yesterday that its second-quarter net income rose 38 percent as sales of digital cameras increased and Chief Executive Officer Daniel Carp cut costs. The company's shares jumped 9.1 percent, their biggest daily gain in six months. Profit rose to $154 million or 54 cents a share, from $112 million, or 39 cents, a year earlier, Carp said. Profit, excluding the costs of job cuts and plant closures, was 88 cents a share, higher than the company's April forecast of 55 cents to 65 cents.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 2, 2003
ROCHESTER, N.Y. - Eastman Kodak Co., the biggest maker of film for movies, agreed to buy Laser-Pacific Media Corp., a Hollywood photography-services company, for $30.5 million to expand its digital services for the entertainment industry. Kodak will pay $4.22 a share in stock or cash, 37 percent more than Laser-Pacific's closing price yesterday. Laser-Pacific provides editing and other post-production services for film and television and had $31.8 million in sales last year, Kodak said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 23, 2003
ROCHESTER, N.Y. - Eastman Kodak Co. will eliminate as many as 2,200 jobs as the slumping economy and consumers' shift to digital cameras hurts sales and profit at the biggest filmmaker. Kodak's stock yesterday had its biggest drop in 16 months. Costs to fire workers will total as much as $100 million this year, Kodak said. Job cuts helped the company rebound to a profit in the fourth quarter, though results fell short of analysts' forecasts. The company said this quarter's profit will be about 13 cents a share, less than half the 28-cent average estimate of analysts in a Thomson First Call survey.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 16, 1998
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks were mixed yesterday, as the Nasdaq composite index set its sixth straight record after bullish sales forecast by Intel Corp.Investors bought Eastman Kodak Co. and other companies that topped earnings estimates, and punished Caterpillar Inc. and Whirlpool Corp. for falling short.The Nasdaq soared 26.13, or 1.3 percent, to 1994.54. The index, packed with computer companies, is up 27 percent this year.The Dow Jones industrial average fell 11.07 to 9,234.47 after topping 9,300 for the first time, and the Standard & Poor's 500 index fell 2.77 to 1,174.
NEWS
By Jill L. Zarend and Jill L. Zarend,Staff writer | December 17, 1991
Peggy Vick of the Salvation Army says she's is "thrilled with the response" she has gotten from the business community this holiday season."The neat thing that has happened this year is that corporations are realizing that the business sector is helping the non-profit sector," she said."
BUSINESS
By Opinions on stocks offered by investment experts. Compiled by Steve Halpern for Knight Ridder | November 27, 1991
Eastman Kodak"After foundering for several years, Eastman Kodak's (EK, NYSE, around $46) latest restructuring seems to be taking hold," says Wellesley, Mass.-based United & Babson Investment Report."Management is determined to turn the company around. We expect the restructuring to have a positive effect on future earnings. The company should post strong profit gains next year as the economy accelerates. The stock is now yields over 4 percent. Based on historical evaluations, the issue appears very attractive."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 23, 2004
ROCHESTER, N.Y. - Eastman Kodak Co., the world's biggest photography company, said demand for digital products and services is rising faster than it had expected and that more than half of its sales should come from that business by next year. Digital sales will increase at an annual rate of 36 percent from this year to 2007, Kodak said yesterday at a meeting in New York with investors. The Rochester, N.Y., company had projected annual growth of 26 percent from 2002 and 2006. Total revenue should increase by 7 percent to 8 percent from this year to 2007 as waning demand for film limits gains made in digital markets, Kodak said.
BUSINESS
By Sylvia Porter | September 12, 1990
Whenever there is international turmoil, new opportunities arise for losing lots of money by investing in precious metals.These opportunities always exist, but it is during international crises that otherwise sensible people embrace them.One of the latest is an offering made on television. This allows you to buy "uncirculated" one-ounce silver coins for $25 each. These coins are produced by the United States Mint and bear the one dollar denomination, though their silver content renders them clearly to be worth more than a dollar.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 18, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court moved yesterday into a major legal dispute in the competitive business equipment industry, agreeing to explore the impact of antitrust laws on the market for servicing copiers, computers and other high-tech machines.The specific issue, raised in an appeal by Eastman Kodak Co., is whether a manufacturer of machines may refuse legally to sell replacement parts to companies that compete with it in servicing its machines.Kodak is seeking to head off the trial of an antitrust lawsuit against it by 18 companies, located in 10 states, which compete directly with Kodak in servicing Kodak copying and microfilming machines.
BUSINESS
By Sylvia Porter | September 12, 1990
Whenever there is international turmoil, new opportunities arise for losing lots of money by investing in precious metals.These opportunities always exist, but it is during international crises that otherwise sensible people embrace them.One of the latest is an offering made on television. This allows you to buy "uncirculated" one-ounce silver coins for $25 each. These coins are produced by the United States Mint and bear the one dollar denomination, though their silver content renders them clearly to be worth more than a dollar.
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